Notes on Contributors

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically
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Kleanthes K. Grohmann
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Akemi Matsuya
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Eva-Maria Remberger
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Notes on Contributors

Pritha Chandra is currently Professor of Linguistics in the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi. She is a theoretical syntactician, and works primarily on phi-features and Case. Her most current research concentrates on meso-level and micro-level variation in Indo-Aryan languages, and the derivative nature of certain features in natural language. [homepage: http://web.iitd.ac.in/~pritha; email: pritha@hss.iitd.ac.in]

Isabel Crespí is a predoctoral researcher at the Centre de Lingüística Teòrica (CLT) of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). In her thesis, she studies the internal structure and combinatorial properties of non-personal verbal forms, especially of participles. She focuses on the properties of passive participles in Romance languages, taking Catalan as the baseline. She is a member of different research groups, such as NEON (Neoconstructionist approaches to Spanish, Catalan and Basque), the SIGGRAM project (Significado y Gramática), and FARM (Formal Approaches to Romance Microvariation). [homepage: www.isabelcrespi.cat; email: isabel.crespi@uab.cat]

Laura Grestenberger is Assistant Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Vienna. Her research focuses on historical and comparative Indo-European linguistics, language change, and theoretical linguistics, especially syntax and morphology. She is a specialist for the verbal and nominal morphology of the older Indo-European languages and has published widely on verbal morphosyntax from a synchronic and diachronic perspective. Her forthcoming book Deponency: a cross-linguistic perspective is due to appear with Cambridge University Press in 2021. [homepage: www.lauragrestenberger.com; email: laura.grestenberger@univie.ac.at]

Nino Grillo is Senior Lecturer of Linguistics and PI of the Psycholinguistics Lab at the Department of Language and Linguistic Science, University of York. His work focuses on the interaction of grammatical and processing constraints in the areas of sentence processing, language acquisition and impairment, and on syntactic theory, focusing on the interfaces with semantics and more recently prosody. [homepage: https://www.york.ac.uk/language/people/academic-research/nino-grillo; email: nino.grillo@york.ac.uk]

Kleanthes K. Grohmann is Professor of Biolinguistics in the Department of English Studies at the University of Cyprus and the Director of CAT, the Cyprus Acquisition Team (CAT Lab). He has published widely in the areas of syntactic theory, comparative syntax, language acquisition, impaired language, and multilingualism. Among the books he has written and (co-)edited are Understanding Minimalism (with N. Hornstein and J. Nunes), InterPhases, and The Cambridge Handbook of Biolinguistics (with Cedric Boeckx). He is founding co-editor of the John Benjamins book series Language Faculty and Beyond and editor-in-chief of the open-access journal Biolinguistics. [homepage: http://www.kleanthes.biolinguistics.eu; email: kleanthi@ucy.ac.cy]

Peter Hallman is a researcher in linguistics at the Austrian Research Institute for Artificial Intelligence (OFAI). His work is in the area of syntax and semantics, specifically argument structure and quantification. Much of his research focuses on Arabic and other Semitic languages, and in recent years he has led a series of research projects on quantification, tense, possession, and, currently, degree semantics in Arabic. [homepage: https://www.peterhallman.com; email: peter.hallman@univie.ac.at]

Maria Kambanaros is Professor of Speech Pathology at the University of South Australia. Her clinical and research interests lie in the assessment and treatment of acquired language deficits, the development of behavioural and neuromodulation methods for rehabilitation of stroke-induced aphasia, and speech pathology practice in complex environments and multilingual settings. She has published widely in the areas of developmental and acquired language disorders, grammatical class deficits, lexical access, and multilingualism. [homepage: https://people.unisa.edu.au/Maria.Kambanaros; email: maria.kambanaros@unisa.edu.au]

Gurmeet Kaur is a postdoctoral researcher at the Georg-August-University in Göttingen. Her research interests lie mainly in syntax and its interface with semantics/pragmatics. In her recent work, she explores the syntax of allocutive agreement, focusing on its interaction with subject agreement. She also works extensively on imperatives, person licensing, case, agreement, and cliticization. Her primary empirical focus is South Asian languages but recent joint work has also examined Japanese and French. [homepage: https://sites.google.com/site/gurmeetk88/home; email: gurmeet.kaur@phil.uni-goettingen.de]

Adam Ledgeway is Professor of Italian and Romance Linguistics at the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics of the University of Cambridge, Professorial Fellow of Downing College, and Fellow of the British Academy. His research interests include the comparative history and morphosyntax of the Romance languages, Italian dialectology, Latin, Italo-Greek, syntactic theory, and linguistic change. Recent books include Grammatica diacronica del napoletano (Niemeyer, 2009); The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages. Vol. 1: Structures; Vol. 2: Contexts (CUP, 2011–2013, co-edited with M. Maiden and J.C. Smith); From Latin to Romance: Morphosyntactic Typology and Change (OUP, 2012); Diachrony and Dialects. Grammatical Change in the Dialects of Italy (OUP, 2014, co-edited with P. Benincà and N. Vincent); The Oxford Guide to the Romance Languages (OUP, 2016, co-edited with M. Maiden), The Cambridge Handbook of Historical Syntax (CUP, 2017, co-edited with I. Roberts), and Italian Dialectology at the Interfaces (John Benjamins, 2019, co-edited with S. Cruschina and E.-M. Remberger). He is founding co-editor of the OUP book series Oxford Studies in Diachronic and Historical Linguistics and The Oxford Guides to the World’s Languages. [homepage: https://www.mmll.cam.ac.uk/anl21; email: anl2121@cam.ac.uk]

Evelina Leivada is a psycholinguist, currently a Ramón y Cajal Senior Research Fellow at Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Tarragona. Her main research interests are language variation and development. [homepage: www.evelinaleivada.com; email: evelina.leivada@urv.cat]

Akemi Matsuya is Professor of Linguistics and English in the Department of Human Sciences at Takachiho University. She has published in the fields of formal and applied linguistics including syntax, pragmatics, cognitive grammar, and first and second language acquisition. She has published Verb Raising and Theta-Driven movement: A Comparative Minimalist Approach with Particular Reference to Japanese. She is a member of the editorial board of The Linguistics Journal. [e-mail: a-matsuya@takachiho.ac.jp]

Gereon Müller is Professor of General Linguistics at the Universität Leipzig. His main research interest is grammatical theory, with a special focus on syntax and morphology. An underlying assumption that guides his research is that both these systems are organized derivationally; another one is that minimalist and optimality-theoretic approaches can and should be combined. His most recent books based on these traits are Constraints on Displacement (2011), Syntactic Buffers (2014), and Inflectional Morphology in Harmonic Serialism (2020). [homepage: https://home.uni-leipzig.de/muellerg; email: gereon.mueller@uni-leipzig.de]

Mohamed Naji is Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Arabic Studies at Moulay Smail University Meknes, Morocco. He is interested in syntax and morpho-syntax of natural languages, and more particularly in the study of Semitic languages. He has delivered several international talks in (morpho-)syntax: at the University of Saint Louis in USA, at SOAS University of London, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Tokyo, Beijing Language and Culture University, and more recently at the University of Leeds. He is now the vice-president of the Linguistics and the Discourse Analysis laboratory, and the Director of the research team Applied and Formal Linguistics. [email: naji.casablanca@gmail.com]

Caterina L. Paolazzi is the Head of the Behavioral Analysis Unit at AKO Capital, an investment partnership based in London. She holds a PhD in Linguistics from the University College London and has published in the area of syntactic processing. Her research interests span from psycholinguistics to deception detection and crisis communication. [email: caterina.paolazzi.11@ucl.ac.uk]

Eva-Maria Remberger is Professor of Romance Linguistics in the Faculty of Philological and Cultural Studies at the University of Vienna. She published on topics in Romance linguistics, such as syntax, morphology, grammar theory applied to Romance, modality, grammaticalisation, and minority languages; she also co-edited several thematic volumes. She studied at the universities of Cologne, Genova, and Bonn. Her doctoral dissertation in 2003 was on auxiliary verbs in Italian and Sardinian, for which she was assigned the Ernst-Reuter-Prize by the Freie Universität Berlin. From 2006–2013 she worked as a junior professor at the University of Konstanz; for 2007–2008 she was awarded a Feodor-Lynen-scholarship by the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation, which she spent as a Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge at the college of Clare Hall. Since March 2013 she teaches at the University of Vienna. [homepage: https://homepage.univie.ac.at/eva-maria.remberger; email: eva-maria.remberger@univie.ac.at]

Anindita Sahoo is currently Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras. Her research interests lie primarily in language typology and syntactic universals. Her most recent work focuses on copula construction and honorification in South Asian languages with respect to how it can reveal a range of formal generalizations regarding these two linguistic phenomena. [homepage: https://hss.iitm.ac.in/team-members/anindita-sahoos; email: anindita@iitm.ac.in]

Andrea Santi is Associate Professor of Neurolinguistics/Psycholinguistics in the Department of Linguistics at the University College London. She has published extensively on the mechanisms and neural basis of sentence processing using methods such as fMRI, eye-tracking, self-paced reading, and judgment data from large scale web-based experiments. Her work has been published in various prestigious journals, such as Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Human Brain Mapping, Cognition, and Journal of Memory and Language. [homepage: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/pals/people/andrea-santi; email a.santi@ucl.ac.uk]

Arhonto Terzi is Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Speech and Language Therapy at the University of Patras. She has published on syntactic theory, comparative syntax, and, more extensively, on (their contribution to) language acquisition and language impairments. [homepage: http://logoth.upatras.gr/en/faculty/arhonto-terzi; email: aterzi@upatras.gr]

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