Note on Contributors

José Carlos Avelãs Nunes

holds a PhD in Architecture and is a researcher at the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT), at the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon.

Cláudia Castelo

holds undergraduate and master degrees in History by the New University of Lisboa, and a PhD in Social Sciences (Historical Sociology) by the University of Lisbon. Currently, she is a senior researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences (University of Lisbon). Her research interests focus on knowledge, development and migration in the Portuguese colonial empire (nineteenth and twentieth centuries).

Maria Paula Diogo

is Full Professor of History of Technology and Engineering at the NOVA School of Sciences and Technology and member of the Interuniversity Centre of the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT). Having pioneered the field of History of Technology in Portugal, her research focuses on the History of Engineering in Portugal and former colonies, particularly concerning circulation and appropriation of knowledge, networks, centres, and peripheries and, more recently, the concept of Anthropocene. She has published extensively on these topics. As co-author of one of the books of the Making Europe book series (Europeans Globalizing: Mapping, Exploiting, Exchanging) she was awarded the Freeman Prize by EASST. In 2020 she was awarded the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, the highest recognition of the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT).

Lídia Fernandes

holds an undergraduate degree in Archaeology and a Master in Art History. Since 1989 she has worked as an archaeologist at the Lisbon City Hall, and since 2010 has been appointed coordinator of the current Lisbon Museum – Roman Theater. She published several articles highlighting studies on architectural elements of Roman times, ceramics, urban archaeology, sites where mathematical games have been carved in stone in Lisbon and Portugal, and especially on the Roman theatre of Lisbon. She has curated several exhibitions in Lisbon and authored catalogues on Olisipography.

Daniel Gamito-Marques

has a background in biology and holds a PhD in History of Science History, Philosophy and Heritage of Science and Technology from the NOVA University of Lisbon (2015). His PhD thesis focuses on the foundation and consolidation of the first natural history museum of Lisbon. Currently he holds a position as junior researcher in the H2020 project InsSciDE – Inventing a Shared Science Diplomacy for Europe. He is member of Interuniversity Centre for the History of Sciences and Technology (CIUHCT) since 2011. He has published articles on the interactions between naturalists, scientific institutions, and nineteenth-century Lisbon.

Carlos Godinho

is a PhD candidate in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Lisbon. He has been researching on the history of the celestial and armillary sphere, as an in-between cosmological model. Crossing astronomy, philosophy, and religion, he studies the model’s role in the political culture from early modern times, more specifically as a national symbol of Portugal. He has been a researcher in the project “Visions of Lisbon – Science, technology and medicine (STM) and the making of a techno-scientific capital (1870–1940)”.

Inês Gomes

holds a PhD in History and Philosophy of Science from the University of Lisbon (2015). She held a postdoctoral position at the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Sciences and Technology (CIUHCT) and collaborated with the Institute of Contemporary History (IHC), doing research in the areas of urban history of science and environmental history. Currently, she is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Coimbra at CEIS20-Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, participating since June 2019 in the European Research Council funded project ReSEED. Rescuing seed’s heritage: engaging in a new framework of agriculture and innovation since the eighteenth century.

João Machado

works in the field of history of science and technology since 2012, joining the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT) as a research fellow in 2015. In 2019 he started his PhD project at the NOVA School of Science and Technology, “Computing was the solution, what was the problem?,” focusing on emerging computer technologies and their effects in Portugal during the 1980s, supported by a four-year scholarship from FCT-IP (SFRH/BD/145338/2019).

Celia Miralles Buil

is an urban historian. She holds a PhD in History and Urbanism from the Université Lumière Lyon 2 and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in 2014. She is currently an assistant professor at the University of Strasbourg (France). Between 2017 and 2020 she was a Post-Doc Researcher at University of Lisbon (Portugal), member of the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT). Her research interests include history of health and environment in Iberian cities in the twentieth century.

Ana Duarte Rodrigues

is assistant professor at the Department of History and Philosophy of Science of the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon. She is the coordinator of the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Sciences and Technology (CIUHCT). Her research explores the history of gardens and landscapes through an STM perspective. She was PI of two projects: “Sustainable Beauty for Algarvean Gardens” (2015–2020) and “Horto Aquam Salutarem: Water Wise Management in Gardens in the Early Modern Period” (2018–2021), both funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology.

Antonio Sánchez

is Assistant Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the Autonomous University of Madrid. He was a member of the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT) and is now a senior researcher in the ERC project “RUTTER – Making the Earth Global: Early Modern Nautical Rutters and the Construction of a Global Concept of the Earth”, led by Henrique Leitão at CIUHCT. He is interested in early modern Iberian science, especially in the production of artisanal knowledge related to cosmography and maritime culture. He has published books and articles about this topic in international journals such as Imago Mundi, Nuncius, Early Science and Medicine, History of Science, Journal of the History of Ideas, and Centaurus, among others.

Jaume Sastre-Juan

is Serra Húnter Fellow at the Center for the History of Science (CEHIC) and the Department of Philosophy of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. His main research interests are the politics of display in museums of science and technology, the political history of “interactivity”, and the history of international science popularization policies. He has taught history of science and technology at the Universitat de Barcelona, the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya and the Universidade de Lisboa, where he was postdoc researcher at the Interuniversity Center for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT) from 2015 to 2019.

Ana Simões

is Full Professor of History of Science at the Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Portugal, and she was (co-)coordinator of the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT), from 2007 to 2019. She was President of the European Society for the History of Science (2018–2020). She has published extensively in subjects including the history of quantum chemistry, and history of science in Portugal (eighteenth-twentieth centuries), ranging from popularization of science and science in the press, to entanglements between science and politics, science and the universities, and urban history of science, focusing on Lisbon. She is a founding member of the international group STEP and of the journal HoST. She participates in research projects and networks, and regularly organizes meetings, both nationally and internationally.

M. Luísa Sousa

is researcher and assistant professor (adjunct) at the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT), Department of Applied Social Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology of NOVA University of Lisbon (Portugal). She was Chief Editor of HoST and she is a member of T2M’s Executive Committee. Her publications include works on history of technology, mobility, and urban planning in Portugal and former colonies of Angola, and Mozambique, such as (with Álvaro Ferreira da Silva) “The ‘script’ of a new urban layout: mobility, environment, and embellishment in Lisbon’s streets (1850–1910)” (Technology and Culture, 60.1, 2019).

Ignacio Suay-Matallana

is Assistant Professor of History of Science at the University Miguel Hernández (Spain), and researcher at the “López Piñero” Interuniversity Institute. He has been a long-term postdoctoral fellow at the Chemical Heritage Foundation/Science History Institute of Philadelphia (2014–2015), and a postdoctoral fellow at the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT) (2015–2017). He also serves as secretary of the EuChemS Working Party on History of Chemistry. His research has been published in journals like Annals of Science, Journal of Chemical Education or Dynamis. His main research interests are related to history of science and chemistry (1850–1950), especially customs laboratories, sites of chemistry, material culture, textbooks, experts, and regulations.

Jaume Valentines-Álvarez

is a researcher at the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT) and adjunct professor at the Nova University of Lisbon (FCT NOVA). He has recently been a visiting fellow at the University of Geneva. His main interests are the tensions between scientific authority and political authority, having studied junction points of engineering thought, artefacts and politics in twentieth-century Iberian Peninsula (especially around the crises of 1929 and 1973). Concerning technology and urban landscapes, he has published on the visible geographies of amusement parks in Barcelona, the invisibilized architectures of urban nuclear reactors, the underground emotions of the antinuclear movement, and the underground practices in anti-raid shelters during the Spanish Civil War.

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