About the Authors

In: Collaborative Video Production
Authors:
Joe P. Gaston
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Byron Havard
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About the Authors

Joe P. Gaston

began conducting video production activities with his fifth grade students in 2011. The initial activities provided a great deal of insight into conducting video production projects in the classroom. One of the biggest takeaways early on was the impact the activity had on student engagement. Throughout the process he noticed students were actively engaged, even those students who were typically reluctant to participate in group activities. After taking a position within his school system as a technology resource teacher, Gaston developed a two-day workshop on video production. Knowing that most teachers did not have a background in video production, he developed a list of steps for conducting these activities with students. These steps helped teachers better visualize how this activity would look in the classroom and they served as a flexible guide through the process. It was during this time that Joe began to refer to this process as Collaborative Video Production (CVP). Gaston is currently an assistant professor at the University of South Alabama College of Education and Professional Studies.

Byron Havard

has been interested in video production most of his life, engaging in small personal projects, but did not practice formally until he was a graduate student. He was able to focus his interest on video production through his master’s degree project where he wrote and produced a video of vignette’s regarding an instructional design model. Each vignette depicted an instructional designer and another individual, such as a subject matter expert, acting out the details of each model step. As a lead instructional designer at a large telecommunications company, he was involved in the planning, scripting, storyboarding, and directing of several training video productions. Years later, after transitioning to academia, he was able to integrate video production into the courses he taught and eventually created a graduate level course focused on the production of instructional video. Digital Video for Instruction is by far his favorite course to teach. Most recently, he had a proposal approved for the creation of a video production studio that will be dedicated to supporting faculty with the production of instructional video for online and flipped-classroom contexts.

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