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masculinity can be found in the text. 5 See Parsons (2006, 67), who studies physiognomy in Luke-Acts and notes: “As we search for evidence of ancient physiognomy in the Lukan writings, we will do well to make a crucial distinction between topics on which Luke touches and subjects about which Luke teaches

In: Jesus and Other Men

of the Peripatetics must be regarded as weak and effeminate ( mollis et enervata ), when they say that souls are necessarily subject to disorders, but fix a certain limit beyond which disorders should not pass. Do you I ask prescribe a limit for vice?” 14 As we can see, there were several competing

In: Jesus and Other Men

himself with a mother hen protecting her chicks. 104 Possibly the idea is that Jesus is protecting the chicks from foxes like Herod. In these verses, Herod is once again portrayed as evil and thus not ideally masculine. The ideal ruler should be the one to protect his subjects. Herod does not succeed in

In: Jesus and Other Men

is continually “handed over” (παραδίδωµι) and thus increasingly passive and feminized. 51 Before Mark 14:43, Jesus has been the subject of most of the action, but after the arrest he becomes the object of most of the verbs. This also makes his few following speeches more striking. 52 Passivity

In: Jesus and Other Men

discouraging reply was not to be his last word on the subject.” 30 Keener 1999, 417; Lane 1975, 262. 31 Lane 1975, 263. 32 Keener 1999, 416; Luz 2001, 340; Nolland 2005, 634. 33 Gundry 1993, 373. 34 See also Alonso 2011, 176; Beare 1981, 342; Rhoads 1994, 345. 35 Burkill 1967, 173. 36 Santoro L’Hoir 1992, 40

In: Jesus and Other Men