Forthcoming Series: Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities

 

Series Editor: Marcel Danesi, University of Toronto and Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences

In an age of numbers, intellectual and aesthetic partnerships between mathematicians and the contemporary arts, humanities, and entertainment worlds have become virtually routine. Movies, television shows, and websites built around, or involving, mathematics are now commonplace. Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities (MIAH) deals with all aspects of this partnership. The monographs and edited volumes of this book series explore all aspects of mathematics outside of mathematics itself, that is, as a cultural, aesthetic, and representational phenomenon. Each work examines some particular aspect, text, or event that falls under this rubric, from mathematics in natural phenomena (e.g., the Fibonacci Series), to math in myth and mysticism (e.g., the ancient Egyptian god Horus), in the arts (e.g., the golden ratio), and in pop fiction (e.g., movies, novels). The series presents mathematics as a cultural phenomenon, rather than as an abstract technical field.

Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities also explores such areas as the role of mathematics in new forms of art, such as digital art, and websites that present interesting facts about the interconnection between math and everyday life. These are discussed in terms of critical and genre theories that apply to any textual creation. The series is thus of interest to scholars and instructors involved in interdisciplinary work in which mathematics surfaces as an ancillary or thematic focus, including culture studies, literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, and art criticism. Furthermore, it is of interest and relevance to anyone who is interested in how mathematics is evolving in cultural spaces, new and old.

Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities is published in cooperation with The Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors welcome proposals for monographs written for academics and researchers in the field that are based on original scholarly research that makes a notable contribution to the subject. The series editors will also consider proposals for edited volumes that demonstrate strong thematic coherence and continuity among the contributions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.

ISSN: 2666-2299

Editorial Board

  • Stacy Costa, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
  • Brent Davis, University of Calgary
  • Dragana Martinovic, University of Windsor
  • John Mighton, The Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences
  • Yair Neuman, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
  • Frank Nuessel, University of Louisville
  • Rafael Núñez, University of California, San Diego
  • Mark Turner, Case Western Reserve University