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Editor-in-Chief: Ming-yeh T. Rawnsley
The International Journal of Taiwan Studies, cosponsored by Academia Sinica and the European Association of Taiwan Studies, is a principal outlet for the dissemination of cutting-edge research on Taiwan. Its editorial office is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China (Taiwan) and is hosted by the Centre of Taiwan Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. IJTS is the first internationally collaborative, multidisciplinary, and peer-reviewed academic research journal in English dedicated to all aspects of Taiwan Studies, including social sciences, arts and humanities, and topics which are interdisciplinary in nature. This publication on Taiwan Studies, a rapidly growing field with an increasingly critical influence, aims to reach academics and policy makers of different cultural backgrounds, disciplinary perspectives and methodological approaches.

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In: Volume null: Issue null: International Journal of Taiwan Studies

Abstract

Vietnam–China relations could be captured in the Chinese expression ‘同床异梦’, ‘same bed, different dreams’. Analysing Vietnam–China’s asymmetric relationship, cultural and political similarities, divergences in global ambition and the involvement of foreign powers, this study shows how the relationship is increasingly interdependent but is equally fragile. One possible cause is the low level of trust on both sides, evidenced by repeated calls to ‘consolidate political trust’ or ‘enhance mutual trust’ in their high-level bilateral dialogues.

In: European Journal of East Asian Studies