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suspicion, only sparing his life at the intercession of Titus (3.397-98). After Josephus (allegedly) made his famous prediction of Vespasian’s rise to the principate, however, and Vespasian corroborated that he was a reliable seer, the Roman general began to show him kindness and give him expensive gifts (3

In: Flavius Josephus Online

ἐσομένων, καθ’ ἣν καὶ γέγονε τὰ πάντα καὶ γίνεται, μηδὲν ἐκείνου διημαρτηκότος τῆς ἀληθείας.Then he read to them a poem5 in hexameters,6 which he has left behind in a book7 in the Temple, containing a prediction of what will be, in accordance with which everything has happened and is happening,8 since he

In: Flavius Josephus Online

.68, 343). He likewise supplies a rationale for such a storing of the book, i.e. its projected “witness” for later generations concerning the “predictions” Samuel has just made (on these as the content of his book/address, see note to “were to happen” at 6.66). Josephus’ presentation of Samuel

In: Flavius Josephus Online

the charge is against Moses alone and is only that he had inflicted loss upon (caused damage to, penalized) the people.5This defense by the people and this accusation of Moses are Josephus’ addition.6This conclusion of the Israelites and their prediction that no such revolt would again occur are

In: Flavius Josephus Online

βασιλεύειν καὶ εὐτυχεῖν ἐν τῷ μεγέθει τῆς ἀρχῆς μεταπέμπεται τὸν Μανάημον καὶ περὶ τοῦ χρόνου πόσον ἄρξει διεπυνθάνετο.For the moment35 Herod did not even slightly note36 these predictions37 because he lacked hope in them. But at the height of his power,38 after he had been gradually elevated until he ruled

In: Flavius Josephus Online

to Hezekiah that God has “heard your prayer.” Josephus turns this new, 2nd announcement by Isaiah, revoking his earlier prediction of death for the king (20:1b// 38:1b), into an (anticipated) editorial comment about the divine decision that precedes Isaiah’s one-time approach to the king in what

In: Flavius Josephus Online

instant recognition of the label “Chaldean” among his Roman readers. In first century Rome the term denoted, primarily, a type of “astrologer” presumed to draw on ancient Babylonian traditions, and known to specialize in horoscopes and predictions of death (Cramer 1954: 68-69, 72, 131-44). Josephus is

In: Flavius Josephus Online

. The rabbinic tradition likewise knows of a prediction of the birth of Moses, but it is through a prophecy of Miriam and not through a dream (Soṭah 12b-13a, Megillah 14a, and parallels) that her mother was destined to bear a son who would save the Israelites, who would be cast into the waters, and

In: Flavius Josephus Online

ὡς ἐπὶ μεγέθει τοσαύτης εὐδαιμονίας ἐσομένου.Once the vision had revealed these things to him, Amarames was awakened and revealed them to Iochabele,1 his wife; and their fear became still greater because of the prediction in the dream. For they were apprehensive not only with regard to the child but

In: Flavius Josephus Online

the Philistine”) at the site as irrelevant to Samuel’s prediction of what will happen to Saul there.16Josephus leaves aside the catalogue of musical instruments carried by the prophets in 1 Sam 10:5. He likewise passes over the notation that the prophets will be “coming down from the high place” (MT

In: Flavius Josephus Online