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This book is a comprehensive study of the Germanic loanwords in Proto-Slavic. It includes an investigation of all Germanic words that were borrowed into Proto-Slavic until its disintegration in the early ninth century. Research into the phonology, morphology and semantics of the loanwords serves as the basis of an investigation into the Germanic donor languages of the individual loanwords. The loanwords can be shown to be mainly of Gothic, High German and Low German origin. One of the aims of the present study is to clarify the accentuation of Germanic loanwords in Proto-Slavic and to explain how they were adapted to the Proto-Slavic accentual system. This volume is of special interest to scholars and students of Slavic and Germanic historical linguistics, contact linguistics and Slavic accentology.

more near-front and near-back” (2012:42). 19 It is attractive to think that the imbalances of the Yukaghir vowel system and vowel harmony reflect the adaptation of an original system with front rounded * ü and * ö to a system very similar to that seen in Yeniseian, Pre-Proto-Samoyedic and Pre

In: Indo-European Linguistics
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available in PRINT.

The online edition gives access to a number of newer entries that are not included in the print edition and also includes corrections.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Patrick Baker, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Thomas Herron, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, Eric MacPhail, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Philipp Nothaft, Katrina Olds, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacre, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.

and growing range of languages, dialects, and varieties—63 to date (March 2014). A constantly updated list can be found on the CDI website (http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/cdi/adaptations_ol.htm). However, the majority of these adaptations are designed for monolingual children, in a single language

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

suggests that the SSP is now highly ranked. 3 For example, Spanish and Portuguese allow complex onsets only if there are no SSP violations. Violations of the SSP in initial position are repaired through epenthesis, a process which must be synchronically active since it occurs in both loan adaptation

In: Indo-European Linguistics

-European inherited declension class related to the type of Vedic sákhā ‘friend’ (acc. sg. sákhāyam ), rather than the result of a foreign adaptation (Schwyzer 1939: 479; Chantraine 1933: 115). In Greek this category has the same formal characteristics as diphthongal stems, that is, its endings underwent the fall

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

points out that word classes such as noun, verb, etc. were purpose-built concepts, as “a natural” and “brilliant response” “to the problems posed by a language of a particular type” (this language being Ancient Greek, with some minor adaptations from Classical Latin) (p. 77). PoS, noun, etc. all go back

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

bulk of the Greek dialects are attested from the Archaic and Classical periods, ca. the eighth through the third centuries BCE , from the adaptation of the Greek alphabet to the spread of the koiné during the Hellenistic period. They are found across the Mediterranean, from southern Italy and Sicily

In: Indo-European Linguistics

phonetic value of the Luwian laryngeals, Simon gives a convenient table in which all values of the renderings of these consonants in neighbouring languages are given (Simon 2014: 886). A part of this table is reproduced here (with minor adaptations

In: Indo-European Linguistics

Processing , 131–154. Hillsdale, NJ : Erlbaum. Shatskov, Andrew. 2006. Some remarks on Hittite infix verbs of the type h̬arni(n)k -. Altorientalische Forschungen 33(2).286–292. Svensson, Ann-Marie and Jürgen Hering. 2009. On the English and German Adaptation of French Loans in the Germanic

In: Indo-European Linguistics