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’ features a few tragic days during the Nazi German occupation of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. The main character is Florya, a boy who finds a rifle buried in the sand and joins a partisan troop fighting the Nazis. The spectator is carried from sensual visions of nature, humans and animals to

In: International Criminal Law Review

Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom and the Provisional Government of the French Republic , 5 June 1945, avalon.law. yale.edu /wwii/ger01.asp, accessed 13 May 2018, which set out the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany and provided the following: ‘The principal Nazi leaders as specified by the

In: International Criminal Law Review

international community witnessed the devastatingly far-reaching effects of genocidal propaganda through publications such as Der Stürmer in Nazi Germany and Kangura in Rwanda, which, combined with many other explicit and implicit forms of incitement, saw the combined deaths of millions of innocent people

In: International Criminal Law Review

case-by-case, bottom-up and holistic manner that suits the needs of those affected, taking into consideration what and who this is all about. 1 The Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals were created by the victorious powers of the Second World War to prosecute German and Japanese leaders for their

In: International Criminal Law Review