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success. We all wish Eirene well—her work, her energy, her enthusiasm, and her wisdom have been an inspiration to us all.

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

678 English words associated with energy technology, each with an explanatory gloss. There is as well an introduction by the editor explaiing the basis for judging neologisms.]

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

ixe milisi). In Chapter Three, the author reviews the basic notions of the theory of grammaticalization, and seeks to establish the validity of the theory’s claims by testing them against the facts from the development of will and θ a . Consider- able energy is expended in establishing the limits of

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

). Part II, entitled “Scientifi c Terminology”, includes a bilingual (English to MG) glossary of Energy Technology vocabulary, incorporating 361 English terms along with their MG equivalents and defi nitions. Furthermore, there is a MG index of 221 entry-terms (main entries) with their derivative terms

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

author gives an exegesis for the rise of this movement, touching on its linguis- tic, philosophical and sociopolitical underpinnings. In doing so, he provides a useful context to the era, one that helps us understand the momentum and energy of Atticism that propelled it through the centuries in one form

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

be identical in terms of sonority. Technically, the major segmental classes are characterised by c- and v- elements (c- meaning low degree of periodic energy, and v- meaning high degree of peri- odic energy). Each segment has an obligatory c- or v-head, and, depending on its type, may also have a non

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

pitch and energy. Mischler (2008) argues that not only laughter, but also expressive phonology, such as exhaled and audible breath, vowel lengthening, long pauses, and glottal stops, are system- atically and strategically used as a form of internal evaluation to frame dis- course as humorous. Such

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

energy, the semogenic powerhouse of language. It is in grammar that our world takes shape. Thus, ultimately, it is through our lexicogrammatical potential that pain is transformed into language. Before we finally move on to the central question addressed in this study, namely, ‘what is pain for language

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

; it had become the prevailing emotion with most of those who came into contact with that epochal work. An energizing blast of energy and warmth “reminiscent of a Victor Hugo and an Alphonse de Lamartine” runs through the pages of La Montagne Inspirée , boasted a 1934 editorial in Lebanon’s leading

In: Arabic and its Alternatives

energy were no more than causes, bases, prerequisites of unexcelled, Supreme, Perfect Awakening” (trans. Tatelman). 30 The author of the Sudhana-play was at home with classical Indian dramatic literature. His work presupposes several centuries of development and maturation, and although it is not

In: Indo-Iranian Journal