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America, colonial officials focused their energies on returning those who had been rendered idle by the destruction of their sites of labor back to work (Sawislak 1995:69–120). Where other scholars have highlighted this preoccupation in their studies of individual disasters, this article foregrounds the

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

Doig’s painting represents (a palm in the night) than by its kinetic energy and the way in which color is applied (or not) on the canvas. Doig’s partly figurative and partly abstract landscapes or his choice of saturated colors often create almost hallucinatory images or, as he himself has put it

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

[First paragraph]Sugar. GEORGE C. ABBOTT. London: Routledge, 1990. xv + 396 pp. (Cloth £45.00)The Making of a Sugar Giant: Tate and Lyle 1859-1989. PHILIPPE CHALMIN. Translated by Erica Long-Michalke. London: Harwood Academie Publishers, 1990. xvii + 782 pp. (Cloth US$ 57.00 or £32.00)Sugar has about as many facets as there are faces to a sucrose crystal: binder, bulking agent, cariogenic factor, chemical, colorant, commodity, energy source, fermentation substrate, flavor enhancer, medication, preservative, stabilizer, sweetener, and texture modifier are aspects that immediately come to mind. Millions of people and billions of dollars are employed worldwide in the production and marketing of what has become one of the basic foodstuffs of humanity. In the Caribbean and elsewhere, sugar has been the mortar in the building of nations. Sugar is a field of inquiry for all kinds of professionals outside the industry - natural and social scientists; bankers, civil servants, politicians, and trade unionists; journalists and librarians; doctors, engineers, food technologists, and nutritionists - and there has long been a need for an overview that answers their questions (or suggests where answers may be found) and provides a conceptual frame of reference, something along the lines of the outstanding but now dated The World's Sugar: Progress and Policy by Vladimir P. Timoshenko & Boris C. Swerling (1957) or the International Sugar Council's The World Sugar Economy: Structure and Policies (1963).

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

-Philip D. Morgan, Marcus Wood, Blind memory: Visual representations of slavery in England and America 1780-1865. New York: Routledge, 2000. xxi + 341 pp.-Rosemarijn Hoefte, Ron Ramdin, Arising from bondage: A history of the Indo-Caribbean people. New York: New York University Press, 2000. x + 387 pp.-Flávio dos Santos Gomes, David Eltis, The rise of African slavery in the Americas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. xvii + 353 pp.-Peter Redfield, D. Graham Burnett, Masters of all they surveyed: Exploration, geography, and a British El Dorado. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000. xv + 298 pp.-Bernard Moitt, Eugenia O'Neal, From the field to the legislature: A history of women in the Virgin Islands. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 2001. xiii + 150 pp.-Allen M. Howard, Nemata Amelia Blyden, West Indians in West Africa, 1808-1880: The African Diaspora in reverse. Rochester NY: University of Rochester Press, 2000. xi + 258 pp.-Michaeline A. Crichlow, Kari Levitt, The George Beckford papers. Kingston: Canoe Press, 2000. lxxi + 468 pp.-Michaeline A. Crichlow, Audley G. Reid, Community formation; A study of the 'village' in postemancipation Jamaica. Kingston: Canoe Press, 2000. xvi + 156 pp.-Linden Lewis, Brian Meeks, Narratives of resistance: Jamaica, Trinidad, the Caribbean. Kingston: University of the West Indies Press, 2000. xviii + 240 pp.-Roderick A. McDonald, Bridget Brereton, Law, justice, and empire: The colonial career of John Gorrie, 1829-1892. Kingston: University of the West Indies Press, 1997. xx + 371 pp.-Karl Watson, Gary Lewis, White rebel: The life and times of TT Lewis. Kingston: University of the West Indies Press, 1999. xxvii + 214 pp.-Mary Turner, Armando Lampe, Mission or submission? Moravian and Catholic missionaries in the Dutch Caribbean during the nineteenth century. Göttingen, FRG: Vandenburg & Ruprecht, 2001. 244 pp.-O. Nigel Bolland, Anton L. Allahar, Caribbean charisma: Reflections on leadership, legitimacy and populist politics. Kingston: Ian Randle; Boulder CO: Lynne Rienner, 2001. xvi + 264 pp.-Bill Maurer, Cynthia Weber, Faking it: U.S. Hegemony in a 'post-phallic' era. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. xvi + 151 pp.-Kelvin Santiago-Valles, Christina Duffy Burnett ,Foreign in a domestic sense: Puerto Rico, American expansion, and the constitution. Durham NC: Duke University Press, 2001. xv + 422 pp., Burke Marshall (eds)-Rubén Nazario, Efrén Rivera Ramos, The legal construction of identity: The judicial and social legacy of American colonialism in Puerto Rico. Washington DC: American Psychological Association, 2000. 275 pp.-Marc McLeod, Louis A. Pérez, Jr., Winds of change: Hurricanes and the transformation of nineteenth-century Cuba. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001. x + 199 pp.-Jorge L. Giovannetti, Fernando Martínez Heredia ,Espacios, silencios y los sentidos de la libertad: Cuba entre 1878 y 1912. Havana: Ediciones Unión, 2001. 359 pp., Rebecca J. Scott, Orlando F. García Martínez (eds)-Reinaldo L. Román, Miguel Barnet, Afro-Cuban religions. Princeton NJ: Markus Wiener Publishers, 2001. 170 pp.-Philip W. Scher, Hollis 'Chalkdust' Liverpool, Rituals of power and rebellion: The carnival tradition in Trinidad and Tobago, 1763-1962. Chicago: Research Associates School Times Publications and Frontline distribution international, 2001. xviii + 518 pp.-Asmund Weltzien, David Griffith ,Fishers at work, workers at sea: A Puerto Rican journey through labor and refuge. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2002. xiv + 265 pp., Manuel Valdés Pizzini (eds)-Riva Berleant-Schiller, Eudine Barriteau, The political economy of gender in the twentieth-century Caribbean. New York: Palgrave, 2001. xvi + 214 pp.-Edward Dew, Rosemarijn Hoefte ,Twentieth-century Suriname: Continuities and discontinuities in a new world society. Kingston: Ian Randle; Leiden: KITLV Press, 2001. xvi + 365 pp., Peter Meel (eds)-Joseph L. Scarpaci, Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado, Power to the people: Energy and the Cuban nuclear program. New York: Routledge, 2000. xiii + 178 pp.-Lynn M. Festa, Keith A. Sandiford, The cultural politics of sugar: Caribbean slavery and narratives of colonialism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. 221 pp.-Maria Christina Fumagalli, John Thieme, Derek Walcott. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999. xvii + 251 pp.-Laurence A. Breiner, Stewart Brown, All are involved: The art of Martin Carter. Leeds U.K.: Peepal Tree, 2000. 413 pp.-Mikael Parkvall, John Holm, An introduction to Pidgins and Creoles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. xxi + 282 pp.

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

. Three focus more on social-cultural themes (ethnicity, migration, and Chinese presence) and three are oriented toward political-economic issues (gold-mining, infrastructure, and energy). Steve Garner takes a comparative approach to understanding the relationship between politics and ethnicity in the

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

mentality” among Haitians themselves. Disaster tourism is as reprehensible as the “warm, sterile self-satisfaction” he sees in Haiti. Rebuilding requires “energy not tears” and “a spirit open to the world” (p. 154). The owner of the Hotel Karibe, where Laferrière experienced the earthquake, put it best

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

could only be sustained through immigration, overwhelmingly, in each case, by the importation of African slaves. The resulting populations skewed toward male adults of prime working age, largely alienated from the fruits of their labor and from formal social power. Their energies instead fueled the

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

, zooming in on a horizontally-oriented bush whose symbol represents stagnation and desperation, but also development and expansion. Likewise, Chapters 3 and 4 (“Havana Under Water” and “Post-Panamax Energies”) delve into cultural productions that deal predominantly with natural resources such as water and

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

some interesting differences with other Caribbean colonies, such as the fact that the Crucian plantations were located in flat or semi-hilled areas, while the factories were on hilltops to take maximum advantage of wind energy. The laborers thus had to haul the cane uphill, making their tasks even more

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids

of the poor in the face of adversely shifting terms of trade and in the teeth of the 1973 game-changing energy crisis. Ledgister also captures very well the essence of Manley’s philosophy, with its peculiar hybridity—advocating a radical participatory democracy by maintaining liberal, parliamentary

In: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids