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important blend of scientific/conceptual and “mystical” methodologies in which he presents us with definitions and axioms alongside metaphors. For Mičaninová, there is no conflict between Ibn Gabirol’s conceptual and metaphorical approaches because, she argues, for Ibn Gabirol “[a] substance is an energy

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

Porphyry and Black Magic In ancient Persia the Zoroastrian priests’ knowledge included philosophy, religion, astronomy, mathematics, and they referred to it simply as maghavan , which means magic . The magician, thanks to his scholarship and his practices, not only knows the forces and energies

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

various chapters. In the early chapters of the treatise, where Plo- tinus addresses the views of opposing schools, McGroarty expends much energy reflecting on precisely which school (Aristotelian, Stoic, Epicurean, for example) Plotinus is opposing in a given line of text or through a particular choice of

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

‘knowledge and skill to form plans […] and the energy and vigour to carry them into execution’ (Example 21). It is, in other words, the statesman’s superior wisdom, intelligence and expertise in political matters that justifies his influence and power in society. In some translations of Aristotle’s Politics

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2008) 128-163 And precisely this mode of supranormal perception—not ‘with the sight of [the] eyes’ but ‘with the mental energy that comes through the powers’— has now also become available to Tat: ‘I am in heaven, in earth, in water, in air; I am in animals and

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

motivation, namely, as a channelling of energies or resources. One who is motivated by eros does not exhibit dissipation and fragmentation,” and especially Dixsaut (2001) “Dire oui à Erôs, c’est toujours à nouveau dire non à tout le reste”, 138. 62)  Scott (2007). Ludwig (2007), 230, asserts that the

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

application rather than the substance of the theory. See Proclus (1933), 314, n. 1. 5)  See J. F. Finamore (1985), 2. 6)  Aristotle, De generatione animalium , 736b37-38. 84 A. Corrias / The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (2012) 81-114 the cosmos as a manifestation of divine energy

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

convincing answer, postulating an essential tension between logos and matter. For Proclus, this tension is positive at heart: it is constituted by that continuous fl ow of energy which unites causes and eff ects in a perpetual cycle of monê, proho- dos and epistrophê , combining similarity and diff erence in a

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition

Spiritual Heritage,” Laurenti Magesa elaborates on the African view of the creation as one of all-pervasive divine energy, with all created beings united in intricate interrelationship, through mysterious interaction, not fully accessible to reason. Our humanity depends on universal order, and is continuous

In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition