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journal, Revue project . 15 A special moment for ceras was the 2014 international conference, “Quelle Justice Sociale à l’Heure de la Transition Énergétique?” (Which social justice at the time of energy transition?), an occasion that gathered more than one hundred people to discuss the technical

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

importantly, fostered a siege mentality that further hampered Jesuit efforts to anticipate and deal with threats to their order. Stuck in a reactive posture, by the 1760s the Society had less energy or will to support the most creative of its members—or perhaps to attract the most intellectually ambitious to

In: The Years of Jesuit Suppression, 1773–1814: Survival, Setbacks, and Transformation

valley and that is stored in the lava of active or dormant volcanoes, however, is only just beginning to be tapped as a source of green geothermal energy by companies in the region, such as Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen). This energy source, almost unlimited in supply, holds immense

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

plants—a kind of biogas and a renewable resource—that can provide an alternative-energy solution for cooking. He concurrently conducts environmental awareness programs and courses for the village leaders. Gujarat Province The Gujarat province was established in 1956, after having been officially

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Manoel Barreto’s Japanese miscellany contains “Dialogues on the Instruments of the Passion,” which show how closely complex cultural structures are intertwined with the machinery of grammar. Featuring the Virgin Mary and Mary Magdalene, the dialogue sublimates maternal and erotic energies in turn while contemplating the usual series of violent instruments. The speeches display not only linguistic competence but literary skill in their use of the personless poetic flow of renga linked verse and the noh theatre. However, the Latinate double-entendre on filho [son (of God and of Mary)] misfires because the Japanese language uses honorifics to maintain stable intersubjective reference and so cannot simultaneously refer to Jesus as both a superior and an inferior. This failure is supplemented with Portuguese marginalia and bold catachresms. Mary Magdalene’s erotic sublimation is presented with less success as excessive literalism frequently produces comedy. Then, an appendix entitled “The Meaning of the Passion” repeats the exercise in halting, clinical prose marred by occasional errors of grammar and style, cataloguing the instruments as dōgu (implements), the word used for art objects in the tea ceremony, and outlining their theological function with attention to precise doctrinal formulations. Frequent use of Portuguese loanwords conveys a (justified) anxiety with regard to the ability of the Japanese language to transmit (European) truth. I identify the dueling Zeami and Aquinas of this piece as a Japanese convert and his or her European mentor, then venture a hypothesis as to the precise historical figures behind these voices in tension.

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

(vital energy) of the Dao. In this way, the transition from the individual to the cosmic and divine is facilitated, without the individual body being depleted and left behind. The visual is crucial for the Daoist: visual contemplative practice is necessary if one is to realize the cosmic depth of bodily

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

extensive artistic energy devoted to depicting sin underscores its importance to the early modern Spanish mindset, in which constructions of sin were fundamental to notions of self. Thus she examines hundreds of references to sin against the historical backdrop of two competing moral economies, that of the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

interest in Catholic Action but picks up energy only when the author leaves the council behind and concentrates on what appears to be to him the more interesting topic of community organizing. Section three contains four essays on Jesuit theologians whose work influenced the council in one way or another

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

took a large portion of Lazarist energy. But he gives relatively little attention to this topic and instead examines at length some examples of Lazarist missions outside Europe, in Madagascar and in the Mascareigne islands. In these missionary endeavors, Smith finds very large gaps between Lazarist

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

wants to avoid suggesting that one needs to be a Jesuit to be a mystic in the spirit of Teilhard. In addition, the structure of the book relies on moving with Teilhard through circles of spiritual and intellectual development: presence, consistence, energy, spirit, and person. Although Duffy does

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies