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Northern Ireland are still at the forefront of contemporary poetics. The award of the Nobel Prize for literature to Seamus Heaney in 1995 and the creative energies of the continuous Belfast group in- and outside of the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s University appear as the crowning examples. The rapport

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

energy and its contents traverse the realms of explosion, sexual violation and poetic vitality – all of them, as the title also implies, possibly drug-induced. Revolutionary rhetoric, such as Pancho Villa’s, co-opts heroic subjects and action; ‘Bang’ shifts the focus to victims and damage. The first line

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

Muldoon’s poetry. By a whimsical typographical mishap, Muldoon’s first and critically acclaimed volume in 1973 ended up being printed in italics. This unfortunate error caused the ‘monstrous’ alienation. The misprint and its evaluation by Wright probably also funnelled Muldoon’s language energies, as

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

questions how these particular formations of meaning have erased their own coming into being. Such linguistic rupturing bears heavily down upon processes of identity formation by recovering the absent and ignored, by revealing the alterior and the alternative, and by releasing the energies of dissemination

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

to itself. 10 Language-conscious, heteroglossic, versatile and divided in form: the stanziac invagination in ‘The Birth’ adds new form and life to this birth poem, as do the multiple terms of biology, obstetrics, geography, mythology – quiffs of language – revitalised, current, with shrieks of energy

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

this view, subjectivity is always split and alienated, and permanently striving towards completion – a process which is both a stage in human genesis (infancy) and a permanent process of the (expanding) human consciousness. An inchoate mind – the liberating and creative energies of which are witnessed

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

energy and universal life force in the psychoanalytical theory of Wilhelm Reich, while at the same time incorporating the title of the previous poem ‘Gone’ that seems to reveal a lack of these energies. As a filet on Muldoon’s linguistic platter that also introduces ‘7, Middagh Street,’ the next and

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

feature of Muldoon’s submission to language – ‘the buoyancy of Muldoon’s language overcomes the sobriety of his subjects’ – but is mainly more concerned, like so many others, with describing Muldoon’s use of language than discussing its points and purposes: ‘The energy of Muldoon’s language is in part a

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

recognisable forms into new alterrratives, italicettes, narrathanotographies. Hay extends the Muldonic repertoire of formal renovation to Persian ghazal, Malayan pantoum and Japanese Haiku, normally with his own touch of idiosyncrasy, while at the same time continuing his old transformative energies. ‘I

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry

totalising system. All of these encoded levels warrant detailed examination in themselves and the copying, cutting and pasting of these heterogeneous elements into an idiosyncratic Muldoon-narrative provide enormous textual energies, fusions and fissions. Multicultural encounters and ventriloquistic hedging

In: Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry