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. Aspirated or breathy-voiced segments have high energy in F0 and high levels of noise (Blevins and Garrett 2004), both of which can last for an extended stretch of the acoustic signal. In the case of Grassmann’s Law, the original speaker produces a phonetic output [pʰɛpʰ] faithfully reflecting a surface

In: Indo-European Linguistics

absence of this cue listeners may perceive voiceless stops as voiced stops (Lotz et al. 1960, Reeds and Wang 1961). 52 In a similar vein, the release burst of voiceless stops is characterized by greater spectral energy at higher frequencies than that of voiced stops (see Chodroff and Wilson 2014 with

In: Indo-European Linguistics

success. We all wish Eirene well—her work, her energy, her enthusiasm, and her wisdom have been an inspiration to us all.

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

678 English words associated with energy technology, each with an explanatory gloss. There is as well an introduction by the editor explaiing the basis for judging neologisms.]

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

ixe milisi). In Chapter Three, the author reviews the basic notions of the theory of grammaticalization, and seeks to establish the validity of the theory’s claims by testing them against the facts from the development of will and θ a . Consider- able energy is expended in establishing the limits of

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

). Part II, entitled “Scientifi c Terminology”, includes a bilingual (English to MG) glossary of Energy Technology vocabulary, incorporating 361 English terms along with their MG equivalents and defi nitions. Furthermore, there is a MG index of 221 entry-terms (main entries) with their derivative terms

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

author gives an exegesis for the rise of this movement, touching on its linguis- tic, philosophical and sociopolitical underpinnings. In doing so, he provides a useful context to the era, one that helps us understand the momentum and energy of Atticism that propelled it through the centuries in one form

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

be identical in terms of sonority. Technically, the major segmental classes are characterised by c- and v- elements (c- meaning low degree of periodic energy, and v- meaning high degree of peri- odic energy). Each segment has an obligatory c- or v-head, and, depending on its type, may also have a non

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

pitch and energy. Mischler (2008) argues that not only laughter, but also expressive phonology, such as exhaled and audible breath, vowel lengthening, long pauses, and glottal stops, are system- atically and strategically used as a form of internal evaluation to frame dis- course as humorous. Such

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics

energy, the semogenic powerhouse of language. It is in grammar that our world takes shape. Thus, ultimately, it is through our lexicogrammatical potential that pain is transformed into language. Before we finally move on to the central question addressed in this study, namely, ‘what is pain for language

In: Journal of Greek Linguistics