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relatively straight-forward affair, other remnants such as healing rituals or the use of certain remedies proved much more difficult to censure because they responded to local need and because it was not altogether clear how heretic they truly were. It is even possible that, on many such instances, identity

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

.e. Bardaiṣan) had examined him (i.e. Shemashgram) and seen that he was faring well, he asked us … We are thus told that a group of believers went “to visit” Shemashgram. The verb used here is from the root S -ʿ- R (‮ܣܥܪ‬‎), which is often used in the sense of “to care for, look after, heal.” The

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

End of the First Millennium , eds. P. Horden and E. Savage-Smith [= Social History of Medicine 13.2], Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 308–321. Sezgin, Fuat, Geschichte des arabischen Schrifttums , vol. 3, Leiden: Brill, 1970. Shefer-Mossensohn, Miri, Ottoman Medicine: Healing

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

table of contents (damaged) as well as the very beginning of the original text (first chapter of Mēmrā i) and a page from the introduction where the author traces the history of the art of medicine and healing back to Asclepius. According to the colophon ( SOP  238, f. 430 v ) that follows the text

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

, Cairo: Wizārat al-ṯaqāfa wa-l-iršād al-qawmī, 1964. Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbdallāh, The Metaphysics of the Healing [= al-Šifāʾ , al-Ilāhiyyāt ], trans. Michael E. Marmura, Provo, UT : Brigham Young University Press, 2005. Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbdallāh

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

بل في صفاقها.‭ 27 ‬»‬‎ Paladius in capitulo cuius principium: “designat quod ulcera uesice et renum sunt difficilis sanationis.” Dixit: “ulcus non fit in carne renum sed in sifac [ ṣifāq ] eorum ubi est urina.” About the aphorism that begins “ulcers in the bladder and kidneys heal with

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

diseases ( kitāb fī al-amrāḍ al-baladiyya ). For in the book on local diseases, Hippocrates says how to recognise prevailing diseases ( al-amrāḍ al-ʿāmma ) in each locality so that one takes precaution from them and prepares remedies to heal what comes about because of them. To achieve this [aim], it is

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World