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trattato di Antonio da Pisa sulla fabbricazione delle vetrate artistiche (secolo XIV) by Salvatore Pezzella,” The Art Bulletin , 59 (1977), 429–30. Among the early allusions to making smalt from zaffre is in a late fifteenth century compilation of methodologies and recipes which mentions “Florentine azure

In: Early Science and Medicine

-by-day, tabular overview with brief descriptions such as the one quoted here, there follows a seven-page commentary, Animadversiones , with descriptions of the instruments and methodology used, and—importantly—Hell’s own deliberations on the weather conditions of Vardø. The very coldest recording, −18 Réaumur

In: Maximilian Hell (1720–92) and the Ends of Jesuit Science in Enlightenment Europe

epistemological and methodological grounds. The goal of a learned society is “the elevation of the sciences on a higher level; and the society achieves this goal by new findings and discoveries, which do not yet exist, in the sciences” by the application of the spirit of observation and invention that imbues men

In: Maximilian Hell (1720–92) and the Ends of Jesuit Science in Enlightenment Europe

against the previous preoccupation with language) as a source of new conceptual and methodological rigor, employing the notion of the intellectual field—“the realm of the culturally preconscious, of tacit beliefs and cognitive dispositions”—as a non-reductionist way to take account of social context: not

In: Maximilian Hell (1720–92) and the Ends of Jesuit Science in Enlightenment Europe

as the cognitive–methodological foundations of the claims advanced in the book are concerned, these are strictly empirical: “I have learned not from books, nor by oral instruction or otherwise from someone else, but from my own experiments alone.” 154 We have no first-hand report about any of the

In: Maximilian Hell (1720–92) and the Ends of Jesuit Science in Enlightenment Europe

generations. By contrast, the debate occasioned by Hell’s Vardø observations was broadly international, and while issues of methodology were involved, considerations of loyalty and factors of patronage were at least as important. Despite—or precisely because of—such differences, both cases throw important

In: Maximilian Hell (1720–92) and the Ends of Jesuit Science in Enlightenment Europe

opened up a whole new way of looking at the famine. Both Gao’s and Thaxton’s book, however, dealt with only particular villages (or a fictional village in Thaxton’s case) in north China. The archival and oral history methodologies Between 2006 and 2010, I travelled across rural China from Sichuan

In: Asian Medicine

job. While they knew the toxicity of mercury and heavy metals well, they were successful in developing a methodology to convert these toxic materials into usable therapeutic forms. I have seen and demonstrated their safety and clinical efficacy through treating patients suffering from acute leukaemia

In: Asian Medicine

the variety and characteristics of these medicines. The introductory essay presents more than the thematic scope of the collection, allowing potential researchers to assess where within the broader palette of manuscripts a given work may fall. It assesses the methodological problems inherent in the

In: Asian Medicine

appears to have made a rudimentary error. He treated an externally contracted pathogen using a methodology designed for cold pathogens. However some practitioners who specialize in ‘canonical formulas’ ( jingfang 經方) believe that all externally contracted diseases can be effectively treated using Cold

In: Asian Medicine