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Collected Essays
This volume comprises thirteen articles each written to provide an exposition and analysis of a specific topic drawn from the European Convention on Human Rights. Many of these topics are either explored for the first time or from a novel perspective. All the topics are examined and presented from a critical standpoint and some important judgments of the European Court of Human Rights are taken to task. Some of the essays have been previously published in a variety of legal periodicals, and have been reproduced in this volume in order to make them more widely accessible.
Geographical Implications for the United States
In 1986, Lewis M. Alexander, a world-renowned marine geographer, prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense a report, Navigational Restrictions within the New LOS Context: Geographical Implications for the United States.

Edited by J. Ashley Roach, the reformatted report is presented in five sections and includes 20 maps, illustrating the world’s international straits and major ocean navigation routes. Forty-three tables present the most comprehensive descriptions of the world’s straits used for international navigation, as well as identify various categories of maritime claims. What made the Report extraordinarily valuable in 1986, and which makes it equally valuable today, is the compilation of geographic data - not available elsewhere - describing the world’s straits used for international navigation and illustrations of the chokepoints and major international shipping trade routes.

Roach has faithfully reproduced Alexander’s seminal work by retaining the original structure and references. A table of defined terms and an index have been added.
In a relatively short time the concept of “sustainable development” has become firmly established in the field of international law. The World Commission on Environment and Development concisely defined sustainable development as follows: “development that meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. This definition takes into account the needs of both the present and future generations as well as the capacity of the earth and its natural resources which by clear implication should not be depleted by a small group of people (in industrialized countries).
The aim of this book is threefold : to review the genesis and to clarify the meaning of the concept of sustainable development, as well as to assess its status within public international law. Furthermore, it examines the legal principles that have emerged in the pursuit of sustainable development. Lastly, it assesses to what extent the actual evolution of law demonstrates the balance and integration with all pertinent fields of international law as urged by the Rio, Johannesburg, and World Summit documents. This is the second volume in the Hague Academy of International Law Pocket Book series; it contains the text of the course given at the Hague Academy by Professor Schrijver.

Cet ouvrage répond à trois objectifs : examiner la naissance du concept de développement durable, clarifier sa signification et évaluer son statut dans le droit international public. Il examine également les principes juridiques nés de la poursuite du développement durable. Enfin, il examine l’évolution actuelle du droit par rapport aux exigences énoncées à Rio, à Johannesburg et au cours du dernier sommet mondial en ce qui concerne l’intégration du concept de développement durable dans tous les domaines pertinents du droit international.
The secession of States is subject to legal regulation. The arguments presented by States in the advisory proceedings on Kosovo confirm that
there are rules of international law that determine whether the secession of a State in the post-colonial world is permissible. These rules derive
from the competing principles of self-determination and territorial integrity. In deciding whether to recognize a secessionist entity as a
State, or to admit it to the United Nations, States must balance these competing principles, with due regard to precedent and State practice.
These lectures examine cases in which secession has succeeded (such as Israel and Bangladesh), in which it has failed (such as Biafra and
Chechnya) and in which a determination is still to be made (Kosovo, Abkhazia and South Ossetia).
This book examines theoretical and practical issues concerning the relationship between international law, time and history. Problems relating to time and history are ever-present in the work of international lawyers, whether understood in terms of the role of historic practice in the doctrine of sources, the application of the principle of inter-temporal law in dispute settlement, or in gaining a coherent insight into the role that was played by international law in past events. But very little has been written about the various different ways in which international lawyers approach or understand the past, and it is with a view to exploring the dynamics of that engagement that this book has been compiled.
In its broadest sense, it is possible to identify at least three different ways in which the relationship between international law and (its) history may be conceived. The first is that of a history of international law written in narrative form, and mapped out in terms of a teleology of origins, development, progress or renewal. The second is that of history in international law and of the role history plays in arguments about law itself (for example in the construction of customary international law). The third way of understanding that relationship is in terms of international law in history: of understanding how international law has been engaged in the creation of a history that in some senses stands outside the history of international law itself.
The essays in this collection make clear that each type of engagement with history and international law interweaves various different types of historical narrative, pointing to the typically multi-layered nature of international lawyers’ engagement with the past and its importance in shaping the present and future of international law.

Originally published in hardcover

International law’s archipelago is composed of legal “islands”, which are highly organized, and “offshore” zones, manifesting a much lower degree of legal organization. Each requires a different mode of decisionmaking, each further complicated by the stress of radical change. This General Course is concerned, first, with understanding and assessing the aggregate performance of the world constitutive process, in present and projected constructs; second, with providing the intellectual tools that can enable those involved in making decisions to be more effective, whether they are operating in islands or offshore; and, third, with inquiring into ways the international legal system might be improved. Reisman identifies the individual as the ultimate actor in international law and explores the dilemmas of meaningful individual commitment to a world order of human dignity amidst interlocking communities and overlapping loyalties.
Nowadays we are fortunate enough to be experiencing a boom in human rights - an enormous increase of their importance in the international sphere at all levels (political, economic, social, legal and moral). For the first time the condition of the individual as “citizen,” and not just as “subject,” has gained importance. Individuals, and not only states, have now become the subjects of international law, as a result of the boom in humanitarian law and international criminal law. However, although there have been many battles won and goals met concerning human rights, the war against injustice continues and the fight has not ended. It is necessary to stay alert and to avoid a potentially paralyzing self-complacency. This collection focusses on topics that are particularly relevant for the present era. It examines issues such as multiculturalism, globalization, international criminal justice (specifically third and fourth generation rights) and, within this thematic framework, the problems that have come about as a result of the expanding reach of the Internet and of new biomedical advances. In addition, it explores the increasingly urgent challenge of how to respond to international terrorism, in view of worldwide events since September 11, 2001, and its resulting aftermath. Originally published in Spanish, this thought-provoking collection will be of interest to human rights scholars and practitioners alike.
L’article 103 de la Charte des Nations Unies touche à la priorité, pour les membres de l’Organisation, des obligations en vertu de la Charte des Nations Unies par rapport aux obligations découlant de tout autre accord. Cette disposition a constamment gagné en importance dans la pratique internationale et nationale de ces dernières années. On pense évidemment à la concurrence entre les régimes de sanction des Nations Unies par rapport aux obligations contenues dans des traités de droits de l’homme. A vrai dire, cette disposition pose toutefois déjà en elle-même toute une série de questions et de problèmes d’interprétation. Que signifie avoir la primauté? Quelles sont les obligations visées? Qu’en est-il d’obligations contenues dans des textes juridiquement liés à la Charte? Qu’en est-il d’obligations issues du droit international coutumier? Et ainsi de suite. Le présent ouvrage cherche en tout premier lieu à donner des éléments d’exégèse de cette disposition importante et difficile du point de vue juridique, dans les multiples directions dans lesquelles son champ d’application est susceptible de rayonner.
Revised and Expanded Edition
China has changed and the continuing changes have not just been about economic development. Among the many transformations there has been another quiet, peaceful, and largely successful (but far from perfect) ‘revolution’ in the area of law, whose deficiencies have been more often mercilessly examined and documented than have its historical achievements and significance. This legal ‘revolution’ is the subject matter of the present book. Like the previous edition in 2008, it examines the historical and politico-economic context in which Chinese law has developed and transformed, focusing on the underlying factors and justifications for the changes. It attempts to sketch the main trends in legal modernisation in China, offering an outline of the principal features of contemporary Chinese law and a clearer understanding of its nature from a developmental perspective. It provides comprehensive coverage of topics: ‘legal culture’ and modern law reform, constitutional law, legal institutions, law-making, administrative law, criminal law, criminal procedure law, civil law, property, family law, contracts, torts, law on business entities, securities, bankruptcy, intellectual property, law on foreign investment and trade, Chinese investment overseas, dispute settlement and implementation of law.
Fully revised, updated and considerably expanded, this edition of Chinese Law: Context and Transformation is a valuable and important resource for researchers, policy-makers and teachers alike.
Also available as an e-book

Le droit de l’arbitrage, plus encore que le droit international privé, se prête à une réflexion de philosophie du droit. Les notions, essentiellement philosophiques, de volonté et de liberté sont au coeur de la matière. La liberté des parties de préférer aux juridictions étatiques une forme privée de règlement des différends, de choisir leur juge, de forger la procédure qui leur paraît la plus appropriée, de déterminer les règles de droit applicables au différend, quitte à ce qu’il s’agisse de normes autres que celles d’un système juridique donné, la liberté des arbitres de se prononcer sur leur propre compétence, de fixer le déroulement de la procédure et, dans le silence des parties, de choisir les normes applicables au fond du litige, soulèvent autant de questions de légitimité.
Le présent ouvrage s’attache à identifier les postulats philosophiques qui sous-tendent la matière, à montrer leur profonde cohérence et les conséquences pratiques qui en découlent dans la résolution des grands contentieux du commerce international.