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Edited by William Fourie

From subversive shop windows to moralising theme parks, Urban Assemblage presents eight diverse perspectives on urban space and culture. The volume spotlights cities as far afield as Johannesburg and Cork City to see how different cultures, media, mobilities and narratives come to form the spaces we occupy; it looks at the Tuscan utopia, the evolution of the hipster, the Neo-bohemian café culture of gentrification, and breaking the rigid urban way of life through the fluid (identity) movement of Parkour. Not only is the subject matter diverse, but the interdisciplinary spirit at the core of this volume elicits convergences and divergences, intersections and parallels by drawing on wide-ranging methodologies and disciplines. Urban Assemblage is an assemblage of eight different voices, informed and cutting-edge in their explications of various urban spaces.

Beyond Legal Minds

Sex, Social Violence, Systems, Methods, Possibilities

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William Brant

In this book, William Brant uncovers social causes of violence, in search of reductive measures. Multiple legal systems are explored as reducers and implementers of violence and threats, especially criminal justice systems. War, propagandizing, power, corporate and governmental involvement in social domination, statehood, dangerous ideologies, and tribal sexual domination are explored in many cultures. Various levels and methods are given for observing, measuring and analyzing how people think and behave regarding the law, including examples of comedy. A theoretical chapter presents legal theory in relation to conceptions of possibility and misconceptions. These ideas are applied to judiciaries, which expose winning strategies for lawyers’ desired verdicts. Dr. Brant accounts for the interconnections between sexual selection, legal systems and wars.

The Sequential Imperative

General Cognitive Principles and the Structure of Behaviour

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William Edmondson

In The Sequential Imperative William Edmondson explains how deep study of linguistics – from phonetics to pragmatics – can be the basis for understanding the organization of behaviour in any organism with a brain. The work demonstrates that Cognitive Science needs to be anchored in a linguistic setting. Only then can Cognitive Scientists reach out to reconsider the nature of consciousness and to appreciate the functionality of all brains.

The core functionality of the brain – any brain, any species, any time – is delivery and management of the unavoidable bi-directional transformation between brain states and activity – the Sequential Imperative. Making it all work requires some general cognitive principles and close attention to detail. The book sets out the case in broad terms but also incorporates significant detail where necessary.

Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments

Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism

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William Tabbernee

During the four centuries of its existence (ca. 165–550), Montanism, an early-Christian prophetic movement, stirred up considerable controversy. Known to its adherents as the ‘New Prophecy,’ its opponents viewed it as a ‘ fake prophecy’ with ‘polluted sacraments.’ Accused of introducing novelty and heresy into Christianity. Montanism, in the post-Constantinian era, was also persecuted by Christian emperors.

This book identifies all known opponents of Montanism, analyzes and classifies the various charges leveled against Montanism, and describes the methods used to counteract and ultimately destroy the movement. Also described are the ways in which the Montanists reacted to the opposition against them, revealing that the picture painted of the New Prophecy by its opponents was grossly distorted.

Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments provides an insightful case-study of the treatment of a minority Christian movement by Church and State both before and after ‘catholic’ Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire.

The 'Spiritual Death' of Jesus

A Pentecostal Investigation

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William Atkinson

Winner of the Award of Excellence of the Foundation for Pentecostal Scholarship 2010.

The teaching of Kenyon, Hagin and Copeland that Jesus ‘died spiritually’ (JDS) is important because of the influence of these men, not least on Pentecostalism. JDS originated with Kenyon, and has been taught in the Word-faith movement by Hagin and Copeland, despite much criticism. It incorporates three elements: in this death, Jesus was separated from God; partook of a satanic nature; and was Satan’s prey.

This theological appraisal takes research far further than previous works, both in method and in scope. It concludes that adoption of JDS by Pentecostalism would be damaging in several respects, and thus draw the latter away from its moorings in traditional Christianity. Pentecostals and others are advised to reject the bulk of this teaching.

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Edited by William Poole

John Wilkins (1614-72): New Essays presents ten fresh essays on the life and work of the influential English natural philosopher and theologian, John Wilkins. Wilkins, one of the most prominent figures in the scientific revolution in England, and a founder of the Royal Society of London, published widely on astronomy, mechanics, language, and theology, and was also an important churchman and politician. These ten essays review Wilkins’s writings and influence, while also addressing the wider contexts of his activities, including his service as head of house at two successive colleges in Oxford and Cambridge, and his political work. This new collection thus covers all aspects of Wilkins’s career, and functions as a complete reappraisal of this seminal early modern figure.

Contributors are: C. S. L. Davies, Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Henderson, Natalie Kaoukji, Rhodri Lewis, Scott Mandelbrote, Jon Parkin, William Poole, Anna Marie Roos, and Richard Serjeantson.

Theophrastus of Eresus Commentary Volume 8

Sources on Rhetoric and Poetics (Texts 666-713)

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William Fortenbaugh

This volume is a commentary on the rhetorical and poetic texts collected in the second volume of Theophrastus of Eresus: Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought, and Influence. The commentary begins with a discussion of the ancient and medieval sources from which the texts are drawn. Next comes discussion of the titles of Theophrastus' works on rhetoric and poetics. After that each text is discussed individually. In sum, Theophrastus is shown to be an important, though sometimes seriously misunderstood, contributor to the development of Greek rhetorical and poetic theory. The commentary concludes with a bibliography of the modern scholary literature followed by several indices: important Greek and Latin words, titles of works (non-Theophrastean as well as Theophrastean), persons and places, and subjects discussed in earlier sections of the commentary.

Aristotle's Practical Side

On his Psychology, Ethics, Politics and Rhetoric

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William Fortenbaugh

This volume focuses on Aristotle’s practical philosophy. His analysis of emotional response takes pride of place. It is followed by discussion of his moral psychology: the division of the human soul into emotional and deliberative parts.
Moral virtue is studied in relation to emotion, and animals are shown to lack both emotion and virtue. Different kinds of friendship are analyzed, and the effects of vehemence, i.e., temperament are given special attention. Aristotle’s justification for assigning natural slaves and women subordinate roles receives detailed consideration. The same is true of his analysis of correct and incorrect constitutions. Finally, persuasion is taken up from several angles including Aristotle’s emphasis on the presentation of character and his curious dismissal of delivery in speech.

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William Croft

In Ten Lectures on Construction Grammar and Typology, William Croft presents a unified theory of linguistic form and meaning that encompasses crosslinguistic diversity, verbalization and language change. Croft begins from construction grammar, a theory of syntax in which all syntactic structures are a pairing of form and meaning. Constructions are posited as basic; syntactic categories are defined by constructions. The internal structure of constructions directly link elements of constructions to the meanings they express, Constructions across languages can be situated in a space of syntactic variation. Grammar emerges from the verbalization of experience. Constructions occur in a probability distribution across the conceptual space of meanings. These probability distributions evolve, leading to grammatical change in language, modeled in an evolutionary framework.