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Russia and European Human-Rights Law

The Rise of the Civilizational Argument

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Edited by Lauri Mälksoo

In Russia and European Human-Rights Law: The Rise of the Civilizational Argument, Lauri Mälksoo and his co-authors critically examine Russia's experiences as part of the European human-rights protection system since its admittance to the Council of Europe in 1998. The authors combine legal and constructivist international-relations theory perspectives in studying Russia's practice and rhetoric as a member of the Council of Europe and a subject to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights. Certain aspects of human-rights doctrine and practice in Russia are particularly highlighted: the increasing impact of Orthodox Christian teachings on the Russian government's ideology, the situation with media freedom, freedom of religion, etc. The authors draw widely on Russian sources and media. The questions whether modern-day Russia truly fits in the human-rights protection system of the Council of Europe, and whether a margin of appreciation will suffice when dealing with Moscow, are highly relevant in contemporary European politics.

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Nina-Louisa Arold Lorenz, Xavier Groussot and Gunnar Thor Petursson

The European Human Rights Culture – A Paradox of Human Rights Protection in Europe? analyses the political term “European Human Rights Culture”, a term first introduced by EU Commission President Barroso. Located in the fields of comparative law and European law, this book analyses, through first-hand interviews with the European judiciary, the judicial perspective on the European human rights culture and sets this in context to the political dimension of the term. In addition, it looks at the structures and procedures of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), and explains the embedding of the Courts’ legal cultures. It offers an in-depth analysis of the margin of appreciation doctrine at both the CJEU and ECtHR, and shows its value for addressing human rights grievances. This book is novel in that it combines interviews and case-law analysis to show how a mix of differences on the bench are legally amalgamated to resolve probing legal questions and human rights issues. It shows, through a combined analysis of case-law and recent political developments for European human rights, the tensions between judicial and political approaches and the paradox of human rights protection in Europe. It also offers in-depth knowledge of the European human rights discourse. In addition to a rich study of legal materials, the book looks inside the box by adding the judiciary’s perspective. Human rights are widely acknowledged in European societies and cases claiming human rights violations are increasing at both the CJEU and ECtHR. In these times of increased human rights awareness, this book uncovers a paradox in European human rights protection which is created by the push-and-pull between judicial and political interests.

Prosecuting Human Rights Offences

Rethinking the Sword Function of Human Rights Law

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Krešimir Kamber

In Prosecuting Human Rights Offences: Rethinking the Sword Function of Human Rights Law the author explores and explains the extent to which the features of the procedural obligation to investigate, prosecute and punish criminal attacks on human rights determine the contemporary understanding of the function of criminal prosecution. The author provides an innovative and thought-provoking account of the highly topical and largely unexplored topic of the sword function of human rights law. The book contains the first comprehensive and holistic analysis of the procedural obligation to investigate and prosecute human rights offences in the law of the European Convention on Human Rights, which the author puts in the general perspectives of human rights law and criminal procedure.

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Edited by Kristin Henrard

This edited volume sets out to unravel various dimensions of a particular topical question pertaining to minorities and minority protection, which has not been explored yet, more particularly the socio-economic participation of minorities in relation to their right to (respect for) identity. This interrelation and interaction is studied from a multi-disciplinary perspective, spanning a broad range of disciplines, while drawing on a rich variety of case studies covering various corners of the world. This interrelation manifests itself in distinctive ways for religious minorities, ethnic minorities, and indigenous peoples. As it is impossible to provide a comprehensive coverage, this volume aims to offer a range of articles that reveal the breadth of the theme under review, while combining theoretical analysis with fascinating case studies.

Edited by Anne Peters, Evelyne Lagrange, Stefan Oeter and Christian Tomuschat

The law of immunity of states, of international organisations, and of public officials is one of the most important and most controversial topics of international law. The book consists of five parts: ‘State Immunity – National Practice’; State Immunity before the ICJ – The case Germany v Italy; ‘Commercial Activities and State Immunity’; ‘Immunity and Impunity’; and ‘Immunities of International Organisations’.
Although immunities are in principle firmly anchored in international law, their precise legal implications are often unclear. The book takes up a number of new trends and challenges in this field and assesses them within the framework of global constitutionalism and multilevel governance.

Contains chapters in both English and French.