White Lies and Black Markets

Evading Metropolitan Authority in Colonial Suriname, 1650-1800

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Karwan Fatah-Black

In White Lies and Black Markets, Fatah-Black offers a new account of the colonization of Suriname—one of the major European plantation colonies on the Guiana Coast—in the period between 1650-1800. While commonly portrayed as an isolated tropical outpost, this study places the colony in the context of its connections to the rest of the Atlantic world. These economic and migratory links assured the colony’s survival, but also created many incentives to evade the mercantilistically inclined metropolitan authorities.

By combining the available data on Dutch and North American shipping with accounts of major political and economic developments, the author uncovers a hitherto hidden world of illicit dealings, and convincingly argues that these illegal practices were essential to the development and survival of the colony, and woven into the fabric of the colonial project itself.

King Cotton in International Trade

The Political Economy of Dispute Resolution at the WTO

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Meredith A. Taylor Black

In King Cotton in International Trade Meredith A. Taylor Black provides a comprehensive analysis of the WTO Cotton dispute and its significant jurisprudential and negotiating effect on disciplining and containing the negative effects of highly trade-distorting agricultural subsidies of developed countries. To that end, this work details the historic, economic, and political background leading up to Brazil’s challenge of the US cotton subsidies and the main findings of the five WTO reports that largely upheld that challenge. It explores the impacts of the successful challenge in terms of political and negotiating dynamics involving agriculture subsidies and other trade-related issues in the WTO while examining the effects on domestic agriculture subsidy reforms in the United States and the European Union. Finally, this volume sets forth the possible impacts of the Cotton challenge on the negotiating end-game of the Doha Development Round.

Black Toledo

A Documentary History of the African American Experience in Toledo, Ohio

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Edited by Abdul Alkalimat and Rubin Patterson

The African American experience since the 19th century has included the resettlement of people from slavery to freedom, agriculture to industry, South to North, and rural to urban centers. This book is a documentary history of this process over more than 200 years in Toledo, Ohio. There are four sections: the origin of the Black community, 1787 to 1900; the formation of community life, 1900 to 1950; community development and struggle, 1950 to 2000; and survival during deindustrialization, 2000 to 2016. The volume includes articles from the Toledo Blade and local Black press, excerpts of doctoral and masters theses, and other specialist and popular writings from and about Toledo itself.

The Roman Inquisition

Centre versus Peripheries

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Edited by Katherine Aron-Beller and Christopher Black

In The Roman Inquisition: Centre versus Peripheries, two inquisitorial scholars, Black who has published on the institutional history of the Italian Inquisitions and Aron-Beller whose area of expertise are trials against Jews before the peripheral Modenese inquisition, jointly edit an essay collection that studies the relationship between the Sacred Congregation in Rome and its peripheral inquisitorial tribunals. The book analyses inquisitorial collaborations in Rome, correspondence between the Centre and its peripheries, as well as the actions of these sub-central tribunals. It discusses the extent to which the controlling tendencies of the Centre filtered down and affected the peripheries, and how the tribunals were in fact prevented by local political considerations from achieving the homogenizing effect desired by Rome.

Black Girls

Migrant Domestic Workers and Colonial Legacies

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Sabrina Marchetti

In today’s Europe, migrant domestic workers are indispensable in supporting many households which, without their employment, would lack sufficient domestic and care labour. Black Girls collects and explores the stories of some of the first among these workers. They are the Afro-Surinamese and the Eritrean women who in the 1960s and 70s migrated to the former colonising country, the Netherlands and Italy respectively, and there became domestic and care workers. Sabrina Marchetti analyses the narratives of some of these women in order to powerfully demonstrate how the legacies of the colonial past have been, at the same time, both their tool of resistance and the reason for their subordination.

Education and Society in Florentine Tuscany

Teachers, Pupils and Schools, c. 1250-1500

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Robert Black

Scholarship on pre-university education in Italy during the Middle Ages and Renaissance has been dominated by studies of individual towns or by general syntheses of Italy as a whole; in contrast, this work offers not only an archival study of a region but also attempts to discern crucial local variations on a comparative basis. It documents mass literacy in the city of Florence; the school curriculum in the individual Florentine subject towns, as well as in the city of Florence itself; the decline of church education and the rise of lay schools; the development of communal schools in Florentine Tuscany up to 1400; and teachers, schools and pupils in the city of Florence during the fifteenth century.

Last of the Black Titans

The Role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the 21st Century

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Greg Wiggan and Lakia Scott

This book investigates the historical and contemporary role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). In doing so, it provides a background on the pre-colonial entry of Africans into the Americas, as well as African educational traditions, and the struggles for education during the period of enslavement in North America. It discusses the social, historical and contemporary context that pertains to the development of Black education and the formation of HBCUs as a framework for the case study on African American college-bound students’ perceptions about attending an HBCU. Last of the Black Titans weaves in students’ perspectives regarding HBCUs and concludes with insights and recommendations regarding the future of these institutions.

Sufism, Black and White

A Critical Edition of Kitāb al-Bayāḍ wa-l-Sawād by Abū l-Ḥasan al-Sīrjānī (d. ca.470/1077)

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Edited by Bilal Orfali and Nada Saab

This critical Arabic text edition of K. al-Bayāḍ wa-l-sawād min khaṣāʾiṣ ḥikam al-ʿibād fī naʿt al-murīd wa-l-murād ("The Black and White in the Words of Wisdom by Bondsmen Describing the Seeker and the Mystic Quest"), a substantial handbook of early Sufism by Abū l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. al-Ḥasan al-Sīrjānī (d. ca. 470/1077), is based on three manuscripts and is introduced by a detailed analytical study of the author and his work. The work is written in the tone of a guiding Sufi master and collects the mystical tradition of early Sufis in the form of anecdotes and concise aphorisms to instill guiding wisdom into the hearts of aspiring Sufi adepts. K. al-Bayāḍ wa-l-sawād forms an integral part of Sufi literature and is an essential source for the intellectual history of Islam until the middle of the 5th/11th century.

Galen’s Theory of Black Bile

Hippocratic Tradition, Manipulation, Innovation

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Keith Andrew Stewart

In Galen’s Theory of Black Bile: Hippocratic Tradition, Manipulation, Innovation Keith Stewart investigates Galen’s writing on black bile to explain health and disease and shows that Galen sometimes presented this humour as three substances with different properties that can either be harmful or beneficial to the body. Keith Stewart analyses the most important treatises for Galen’s physical description and characteristion of black bile and challenges certain views on the development of this humour, such as the importance of the content of the Hippocratic On the Nature of Man. This analysis allows us to understand how and why Galen defines and uses black bile in different ways for his arguments that cannot always be reconciled with the content of his sources.

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Claretha Hughes

American Black women bring different interpersonal leadership styles to Fortune and non-Fortune 500 organizations. Their interpersonal leadership styles are developed at home, within their community, through their educational experiences, and within society. They bring unique perspectives to the workplace. Organizations that recognize, respect, and value their different viewpoints have leaders who are contributing to the financial growth of their organizations. American Black women have career capital to offer to organizations through their self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and the leadership strategies that they understand and apply in the workplace. In addition they bring high educational achievement, practical skills, and analytical abilities that are useful when leading others. They bring a persistent work ethic, support for education and leadership development, and an enduring spirit of cooperation in the midst of undeserved, personal challenges to the workplace. They solve problems, help others succeed, enhance the workplace environment and organization culture, and help their organizations maintain competitive advantage in an evolving global economy.
Executive leadership should lead the effort to enhance the role of American Black women within their organizations. Change begins at the top and integrating American Black women into executive leadership roles is a change initiative that must be strategically developed and managed through understanding who they are. This book provides a foundation upon which individuals and organizations can begin the change initiative through the use of the Five Values model as a career management system for developing and enhancing the careers of American Black women who are leading within and want to lead organizations.