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Series:

J. Ashley Roach and Robert W. Smith

Now in a third, revised edition, Excessive Maritime Claims by J. Ashley Roach and Robert W. Smith is designed for law of the sea and maritime law specialists. The book draws on published governmental material in the public domain, specifically the U.S., and addresses recent progress in maritime security, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction by sea, piracy, and protection of underwater cultural heritage.

As a result of significant developments in the law of the sea, primarily with reference to the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, Excessive Maritime Claims provides up to date coverage of current affairs as well as introduce new topics such as: submarine cables, polar areas, environmental protection, sovereign immunity and sunken ships, and maritime law enforcement.


Edited by Clive H. Schofield, Seokwoo Lee and Moon-Sang Kwon

The Limits of Maritime Jurisdiction, edited by Clive Schofield, Seokwoo Lee, and Moon-Sang Kwon, comprises 36 chapters by leading oceans scholars and practitioners devoted to both the definition of maritime limits and boundaries spatially and the limits of jurisdictional rights within claimed maritime zones. Contributions address conflicting maritime claims and boundary disputes, access to valuable marine resources, protecting the marine environment, maritime security and combating piracy, concerns over expanding activities and jurisdiction in Polar waters and the impact of climate change on the oceans, including the potential impact of sea level rise on the scope of claims to maritime zones. The volume therefore offers critical analysis on a range of important and frequently increasingly pressing contemporary law of the sea issues.

Series:

Clive R. Symmons

The issue of historic rights and historic waters has long been a problematic area in the law of the sea where even basic definitions have been vague and interchangeably used in the past. The first edition of this book was entitled Historic Waters in the Law of the Sea: A Modern Re-Appraisal, and concentrated, as the title implies, on the doctrine of historic waters. The title of this expanded new edition has been broadened to take account of the important clarifications as to the doctrine of historic maritime claims generally—particularly 'historic rights' in the narrow sense which fall short of sovereignty claims. These latter rights—¬such as they now are—are discussed in depth in the new text. This development has come about, of course, because of the Award of the Arbitral Tribunal in Philippines v. China in 2016. This decision has, for the first time in a judicial setting, rationalised the terminology in this area of the law of the sea; and, most importantly, has clarified the close interaction of historic rights with the Law of the Sea Convention. This new edition discusses the latter issue passim, showing that much of the former customary law doctrine has now been overridden by the Convention.

Navigational Restrictions within the New LOS Context

Geographical Implications for the United States

Series:

Alexander M. Lewis

Edited by J. Ashley Roach

In 1986, Lewis M. Alexander, a world-renowned marine geographer, prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense a report, Navigational Restrictions within the New LOS Context: Geographical Implications for the United States.

Edited by J. Ashley Roach, the reformatted report is presented in five sections and includes 20 maps, illustrating the world’s international straits and major ocean navigation routes. Forty-three tables present the most comprehensive descriptions of the world’s straits used for international navigation, as well as identify various categories of maritime claims. What made the Report extraordinarily valuable in 1986, and which makes it equally valuable today, is the compilation of geographic data - not available elsewhere - describing the world’s straits used for international navigation and illustrations of the chokepoints and major international shipping trade routes.

Roach has faithfully reproduced Alexander’s seminal work by retaining the original structure and references. A table of defined terms and an index have been added.

The Future of Ocean Regime-Building

Essays in Tribute to Douglas M. Johnston

Edited by Aldo Chircop, Theodore McDorman and Susan Rolston

One of the most creative innovations of the international diplomatic community in the 20th century was its invention of the international regime,” wrote Douglas M. Johnston in his last major work published posthumously (The Historical Foundations of World Order: The Tower and the Arena, Nijhoff, 2008). While regimes often provide order and certainty and a consequent reduction in disputes and misunderstandings, regimes are driven by specific concerns. With diverse disciplinary backgrounds and perspectives, the distinguished contributors to this tribute follow a long tradition of scholarly inquiry into the governance, creation, operation, viability and maintenance of international regimes. Their contributions on ocean and environmental regimes as diverse as fisheries, ocean dumping, maritime security, seafarers’ rights, or enhancement of marine environmental protection attest to the depth to which modern international law and the underlying international relations have been transformed into an international law of structured cooperation. This book includes biographical and bibliographic notes on Douglas M. Johnston

Series:

Edited by Myron Nordquist, John Norton Moore and Tomas H. Heidar

While the Arctic Ocean has long been covered with ice, recent changes in climate have caused the ice to melt, spurring both conservation challenges to the region's environment and biodiversity, as well as new opportunities for navigation and natural resource development.

Changes in the Arctic Environment and the Law of the Sea offers policy and legal guidance in response to these new challenges. Synthesizing the presentations of leading experts at "Changes in the Arctic Environment and the Law of the Sea" meeting held in May, 2009 in Seward, Alaska, the topics explored in this volume include the political context and scientific background, marine transport, environment and biodiversity, in addition to offshore petroleum and the status of Spitsbergen. A list of selected Internet resources provides links for additional websites, as well as PowerPoint files from presentations given at the meeting.

Changes in the Arctic Environment and the Law of the Sea is based on the 33rd Annual Conference of the Center for Oceans Law and Policy, a primary sponsor, along with the Law of the Sea Institute of Iceland as well as with the U.S. Arctic Commission, the University of Alaska (Fairbanks) and the Law of the Sea Institute, Law School (Boalt Hall), University of California, Berkeley.

James Kraska and Raul Pedrozo

International Maritime Security Law by James Kraska and Raul Pedrozo defines an emerging interdisciplinary field of law and policy comprised of norms, legal regimes, and rules to address today's hybrid threats to the global order of the oceans. Worldwide shipping commerce, fishing fleets, pleasure craft, and coastal states are exposed to the menace of offshore terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, piracy, smuggling, robbery, marine insurgency and anti-access threats. Land-based institutions and maritime constabulary forces operate within an increasingly integrated network that blends elements of humanitarian law, human rights law, criminal law, and law of the sea, with inspection regimes, commercial enterprise, and marine safety and environmental stewardship. The new authorities fuse together a global maritime partnership among states, international organizations and commercial interests to protect the maritime commons from the most dangerous risks and hazards.

What's Wrong with International Law?

Liber Amicorum A.H.A. Soons

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Edited by Cedric Ryngaert, Erik J. Molenaar and Sarah Nouwen

'What's wrong with international law?'
This is the question Professor A.H.A. Soons provocatively posed to his colleagues around the world when leaving his chair in public international law at Utrecht University. Meant to provoke discussion about what actually is wrong with international law as well as act in defence of the discipline, his conclusion was a resounding 'nothing!'

Honouring Professor Soons's achievements throughout his long career as a scholar and a practitioner of international law, this Liber Amicorum exmaines whether, indeed, there is something wrong with international law. The contributors identify gaps or 'wrong norms' in specific fields of international law, and assess whether there is something wrong with the regulatory function of international law as a system for creating global public order.