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Law and Policy of Anti-Corruption Entry Bans
In Corruption and Targeted Sanctions, Anton Moiseienko analyses the blacklisting of foreigners suspected of corruption and the prohibition of their entry into the sanctioning state from an international law perspective. The implications of such actions have been on the international agenda for years and have gained particular prominence with the adoption by the US and Canada of the so-called Magnitsky legislation in 2016. Across the Atlantic, several European states followed suit. The proliferation of anti-corruption entry sanctions has prompted a reappraisal of applicable human rights safeguards, along with issues of respect for official immunities and state sovereignty. On the basis of a comprehensive review of relevant law and policy, Anton Moiseienko identifies how targeted sanctions can ensure accountability for corruption while respecting international law.
A Consequentialist Assessment
In European Judicial Responses to Security Council Resolutions: A Consequentialist Assessment, Kushtrim Istrefi examines the multiple effects of European courts decisions as regards Security Council targeted sanctions and security detentions interfering with fundamental rights. He elaborates what type of judicial responses ensured real and practical respect for human rights for the petitioners, encouraged Security Council due process reform, clarified Security Council authorisations on security detentions, and tested the primacy and universal character of the UN Charter.
Making use of legal and non-legal instruments, Istrefi sheds some light upon what happened to, among others, petitioners, the SC due process reform agenda, and the UN Charter after such cases as Kadi, Al-Jedda, Ahmed, Al-Dulimi.
Essays in Honour of the Life and Work of Joakim Dungel
This collection of essays—written by friends and colleagues of Joakim Dungel—focuses on the protection of the innocent during and after war. It is a tribute to Joakim’s life and work. Joakim made a significant contribution to international justice and the rule of law, through his service to the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Temporary International Presence in Hebron, and the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan. He was also a prolific author and published scholarly works on a wide range of issues, including command responsibility, national security interests, the right to humanitarian assistance during internal armed conflicts, and crimes against humanity. This book continues Joakim’s work with in-depth analyses of a variety of issues arising under modern conflict, such as the application of international humanitarian law and international human rights law to aerial drone attacks, targeted sanctions, and reparations to victims. Joakim understood these complex and interlinked issues and dedicated his professional life to engaging with them. Through his work and his scholarship, he demonstrated the crucial importance of adopting victim-centred approaches to dealing with the consequences of armed conflict and to its prevention. This was also why he chose to work for the United Nations as a human rights officer in Afghanistan. This book attempts to honour and affirm Joakim’s choice.
Essays in Honour of Professor Ryuichi Ida
The traditional and mainstream conception of international law presupposes a certain ideal type of State. However, each State is situated in a particular context – an Etat situé – and the universal, impartial and non-discriminatory application of international law to each State often produces unjustifiable results in the real world. International law thus needs to cope with this existential question in order to ensure and maintain the effectiveness of the international legal order, without, however, being trapped by a nihilistic relativism. This approach requires a flexible understanding and reconstruction of the international law-making theory. The present collection of essays gathers contributions written in honour of Professor Ryuichi Ida by his colleagues and former students, inspired by the dédicataire, who places particular emphasis upon the context, effectiveness and purposes of international law. The dédicataire’s perspective finds wide ranging applications and the present collection deals with international economic law, international criminal law, international environmental law, international law-making, the law of State responsibility and the law of international organizations.

Contributors are: Tatsuya Abe, Pierre-Marie Dupuy, Shotaro Hamamoto, Machiko Kanetake, Tomohiko Kobayashi, Tomonori Mizushima, Hironobu Sakai, Akiho Shibata, Mari Takeuchi, Dai Tamada, Sakda Thanitcul, Zhi-an Wang, and Takuhei Yamada.

Essays in Honour of Sandy Ghandhi
Adjudicating International Human Rights honours Professor Sandy Ghandhi on his retirement from law teaching. It does so through a
series of targeted essays which probe the framework and adequacy of international human rights adjudication. Eminent international law
scholars (such as Sir Nigel Rodley, Professor Javaid Rehman and Professor Malcolm Evans), along with emerging writers in the field, take Professor Ghandhi’s body of work—focussed on human rights protection through legal institutions—as a starting point for a variety of analytical essays. Adjudicating International Human Rights includes chapters devoted to human rights protection in a number of different institutional contexts, ranging from the ICJ and the Human Rights Committee to truth commissions and NAFTA arbitration tribunals.
Critical Perspectives
International Organizations and Member State Responsibility: Critical Perspectives is the first international public law book entirely devoted to the topic of member state responsibility. Throughout its ten contributions, it takes stock of the legal developments brought about by the International Law Commission’s work on international responsibility, and critically unveils the major remaining conceptual gaps in the field.
The novel approaches offered in the book serve as a repository of the various understandings within academia and legal practice that reflect the evolution of the contemporary law of international (member state) responsibility.

Contributors: Ana Sofia Barros, Cedric Ryngaert, Jan Wouters, Antonios Tzanakopoulos, Catherine Brölmann, Esa Paasivirta, Francesco Messineo, Ige Dekker, Jean d’Aspremont, Niels Blokker, Paolo Palchetti, Ramses Wessel, Tom Dannenbaum

This Volume was previously published as International Organizations Law Review Vol. 12, issue 2 (2015).
Liber Amicorum Vera Gowlland-Debbas
This Liber Amicorum appears on the occasion of Professor Vera Gowlland-Debbas' retirement from the Graduate Institute. It includes contributions by her colleagues and friends from distinguished universities and international institutions. It covers different fields in which she has excelled. This collective work is divided into three main sections. The first section examines matters concerning the law of the United Nations. The second section is devoted to human rights and international humanitarian law. The third section addresses issues related to law-making, compliance with international law and the peaceful settlement of disputes. The result is a collection of stimulating analysis of most of the topical problems of international law. The contributions are in both English and French.
Essays in Honour of John Dugard
The Pursuit of a Brave New World in International Law presents critical perspectives on various inter-related themes in the areas of human rights, international law, terrorism and international criminal justice. The discussions reflect the wide-ranging subjects that John Dugard has engaged with over the last five decades as an international law scholar, teacher and judge. The essays pay homage to Professor Dugard’s impressive body of work as both a theorist and practitioner of international law and international human rights law. While some of the discussions in the volume critically examine his views, as expressed in his academic writings, judicial opinions and official United Nations reports, others deal with subjects that have been inspired by or are related to Dugard’s work.

Contributors are: Neil Boister, Trevor P. Chimimba, James Crawford, David Dyzenhaus, Christopher Greenwood, Larissa van den Herik, Christof Heyns, Maurice Kamto, Tiyanjana Maluwa, Max du Plessis, Thomas Probert, Arnold Pronto, Philippe Sands, William A. Schabas, Ivan Shearer, Hennie Strydom, Mia Swart, Dire Tladi, Annemarieke Vermeer-Künzli and Abdulqawi Yusuf.