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  • Author or Editor: Joshua S. Mostow x
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A Print Series by Kuniyoshi, Hiroshige, and Kunisada
The Hundred Poets Compared is about a 100-print series made by three famous Ukiyo-e artists of the 19th century: Kuniyoshi, Hiroshige, and Kunisada. Each print compares one of the poems from the most-beloved collection of Japanese poetry, The One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each ( Hyakunin Isshu), with a scene from Japanese history or theatre. Begun during the repressive Tenpô Reforms, the series includes many surreptitious portraits of popular actors. Herwig and Mostow explain each episode depicted and its connection to its particular poem, providing a translation of the commentary text on each print and the identification of actors and performances. This work will be welcome to Ukiyo-e collectors and scholars, as well as those interested in Kabuki and Japanese legends.
The Ise Stories and the Politics of Cultural Appropriation
Courtly Visions: The Ise Stories and the Politics of Cultural Appropriation traces—through the visual and literary record—the reception and use of the tenth-century literary romance through the seventeenth century. Ise monogatari ( The Ise Stories) takes shape in a salon of politically disenfranchised courtiers, then transforms later in the Heian period (794-1185) into a key subtext for autobiographical writings by female aristocrats. In the twelfth century it is turned into an esoteric religious text, while in the fourteenth it is used as cultural capital in the struggles within the imperial household. Mostow further examines the development of the standardized iconographies of the Rinpa school and the printed Saga-bon edition, exploring what these tell us about how the Ise was being read and why. The study ends with an Epilogue that briefly surveys the uses Ise was put to throughout the Edo period and into the modern day.