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Spirituality, Education & Society

An Integrated Approach

Edited by Njoki N. Wane, Energy L. Manyimo and Eric J. Ritskes

Spirituality, education and society: An integrated approach argues the value of spirituality in education as a way to address the lived experiences and personal knowledge of students, with the goal of creating a more holistic, transformative educational process. This edited volume has a wide array of viewpoints which all point to the importance of spirituality in the authors’ personal lives, their communities and society at large. Spirituality is conceptualised as a base from which to challenge dominant forms of knowing, while in the process being able to center and engage with an important aspect of the student that has been missing from current evaluations—their spiritual selves. Within the diversity of this volume it becomes evident that spirituality cannot be confined to a singular definition and that educators must be willing to create spaces to foster spiritual growth and exploration if we are to break away from the commoditized, disempowering system that is so dominant today.
This edited collection is a valuable resource for students, practitioners, educators and administrators who wish to engage in transformational schooling. Its multidisciplinary approach engages ideas around critical pedagogy, sociology of education, and inclusive schooling.

Robert Mayes and James Myers

This book provides professional development leaders and teachers with a framework for integrating authentic real-world performance tasks into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) classrooms. We incorporate elements of problem-based learning to engage students around grand challenges in energy and environment, place-based leaning to motivate students by relating the problem to their community, and Understanding by Design to ensure that understanding key concepts in STEM is the outcome. Our framework has as a basic tenet interdisciplinary STEM approaches to studying real-world problems. We invited professional learning communities of science and mathematics teachers to bring multiple lenses to the study of these problems, including the sciences of biology, chemistry, earth systems and physics, technology through data collection tools and computational science modeling approaches, engineering design around how to collect data, and mathematics through quantitative reasoning. Our goal was to have teachers create opportunities for their students to engage in real-world problems impacting their place; problems that could be related to STEM grand challenges demonstrating the importance and utility of STEM. We want to broaden the participation of students in STEM, which both increases the future STEM workforce, providing our next generation of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians, as well as producing a STEM literate citizenry that can make informed decisions about grand challenges that will be facing their generation. While we provide a specific example of an interdisciplinary STEM module, we hope to do more than provide a single fish. Rather we hope to teach you how to fish so you can create modules that will excite your students.

Research Collaboration

Relationships and Praxis

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Edited by Stephen M. Ritchie

Even though collaboration is entrenched in research practices, few studies have considered how the practice is enacted, among whom and to what effect. Reviewing the accounts of successful or productive collaborative-research teams in which collaborators report either concord or conflict in their relational dynamics, featured in this volume, leads to a deeper understanding of what it means to collaborate. The contributing authors explore their relationships and praxis in particular research collaborations that range from large interdisciplinary teams to intimate teams between university-based researchers who collaborate with teachers or students. Successes experienced by the contributors are discussed in terms of solidarity, emotional energy, trust, agency, power, and ethical praxis. It is clear from the studies reported here that despite recognized differences between researchers in teams, if they work with each other for each other, it is likely that they will build solidarity, and experience positive emotional energy and trust. The edited volume is relevant to both experienced and early career researchers.

Ontologies for Developing Things

Making Health Care Futures Through Technology

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Casper Bruun Jensen

Ontologies for Developing Things is a work of unflagging intelligence and intellectual energy, spilling over with new ideas, surprising angles, sharp perceptions and interesting juxtapositions, and written with correspondingly attractive punch and force. Readers interested in information technologies, contemporary developments in social studies of science, and related cultural and political theory will find the book immensely engaging and endlessly useful. - Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Duke University and Brown University [author of Scandalous Knowledge: Science Truth and the Human and/or Natural Reflections: Human Cognition at the Nexus of Science and Religion]

Neighborhoods of the Plantation

War, Politics and Education

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Kaustuv Roy

The plantation is a slave society, a means and a system of usurpation of life energies and bodily productive capacities in the service of endless bankruptcy on the one hand and elite persuasions on the other. The book argues, in part, that war or State organized violence is one of the most efficient means of the elite transfer; the wreckage through war and destruction of ordinary livability opens up the human as organic compounds in the turning of human life into global plantation assets. More importantly, the book argues that this is possible only by means of certain ontological and epistemological deployments that make war on the human-ecological inevitable and even acceptable. This is where pedagogy comes in. The temporal being, the spatial being, and the linguistic being of the human-ecological are explored as three dimensions of captivity as well as the means of escape. The book rejects the politics of power as inimical to the very becoming of the human and posits the politics of strength as a new possibility that breaks with the plantation system of organized violence and vampiric wealth production.

Teaching Drama in the Classroom

A Toolbox for Teachers

Edited by Joanne Kilgour Dowdy and Sarah Kaplan

This book includes strategies for integrating drama in the classroom through the use of creating characters, giving meaning to activities through answering the questions: who, what, when, where, and why about any person and situation under discussion (5 W’s), using storyboards, incorporating music, writing radio scripts, and using literature and movies as prompts for improvised enactments. Students will learn how to create characters and apply those creations to different content-area activities, situations, and subject matter.

This useful resource describes more than thirty-five scenarios of teachers and students in early elementary grades through graduate school working together to craft drama events that draw out participants’ creative energies, interpretations of curricular topics, and investigations of social, political, and personal concerns. In all of these lesson plans, students collectively explore topics, concepts, themes, or tensions that surface as they navigate their way through the conditions and experiences that unfold in a scene, skit, improvisation, or in interrelated episodes. Drama techniques include role play, scripting, dialogue, audience participation, improvisation, and the strategic use of interaction, space, movement, and gesture.

Lifelong Action Learning and Research

A Tribute to the Life and Pioneering Work of Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt

Edited by Judith Kearney and Maureen Todhunter

This tribute to Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt is a celebratory Festschrift of her learning/research action-packed life. Colleagues around the world reflect on their own learning, research and professional development, with and through Ortrun, in action learning and action research (ALAR).
Four Parts identify focus areas in Ortrun’s work and interests over the last 40 years. Higher Education is the site for most of Ortrun’s work experience since 1974 when she joined Griffith University in Australia. Organisations is a context where Ortrun has actively explored processes of learning, leadership and development in management education. Communities of Practice characterise Ortrun’s work throughout her career, particularly through participatory action learning and action research (PALAR) in communities. Futures focusses Ortrun’s recent writing advocating for PALAR as a flexible and effective methodology for responding to rapid change.
Here we see why Ortrun is a quintessential international scholar. And an ALAR practitioner/advocate. Her world view, understandings of knowledge and personal qualities naturally orient her along this path of inclusive, purposeful action. This is why Ortrun is a vital energy in shaping the evolution of the ‘Action’ family of scholarship, now including PALAR and LAL (Lifelong Action Learning). No wonder her life and pioneering work are an adventure story—not just of learning and research, but also of passion and action. This tribute opens windows onto that story.

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C.P. Gause

The United States is more ideologically, philosophically, culturally, linguistically, racially, and ethnically diverse than she has been in any given point in her history; however, many of her citizens are currently living in a state of fear. What stands out the most is how we allow this fear to take over our lives in multiple ways. We fear our neighbors; therefore, we do not engage them. We fear young people and the way they look; therefore, we do not have conversations with them. We fear the possibility of terrorists’ attacks; therefore, we utilize eavesdropping and surveillance devices on our citizens. There are some of us who fear the lost of gun rights; therefore, we stockpile weapons. We fear anything that is different from who we are and what we believe. This nation has, at many points within our history, become more united because of our fear; however, as our borders, physical and virtual, become less protective and the opportunities to connect more via the digital world expand, we must educate our citizenry to not live in fear but in hope. To teach, learn, and lead democratically requires the individual to engage in problem posing and in critiquing taken-for-granted narratives of power and privilege. Critical change occurs with significant self-sacrifice, potential alienation/rejection, and costly consequences. Educators must do justice to the larger social, public, and institutional responsibility of our positions, and we must exercise courage in creating opportunities for change. Diversity, Equity, and Inclusive Education: A Voice from the Margins, provides the space and opportunity to move beyond a state of fear, into a state of “organic transformation,” a place where fear creates the energy to speak those things that are not, as though they were.

Living a Motivated Life

A Memoir and Activities

Raymond J. Wlodkowski

What if, as psychologists and adult educators advocate, a person chose a life where his motivation for the work itself determined what he did? Living a Motivated Life: A Memoir and Activities follows the author through forty years, revealing how he selected vocational pursuits guided by his understanding of intrinsic motivation and transformative learning. As a compass for relevant decisions, these ideas gave energy and purpose to how he lived, and an instinct as sure as sight for the future.

Written with nuance, humor, and unpredictability, this story renders how he came to appreciate learning for the pleasure of learning. Facing similar challenges as those of today’s first generation college students, the memoir narrates his unexpected college enrollment, his friendship with an ancient history professor, and his triumphs and travails as teacher, psychologist, human relations specialist, psychotherapist, and adult educator.

This is the first memoir of someone who consciously chose to lead a professional life to experience flow on a daily basis. It is an important step in the integration and evolution of intrinsic motivation theory and transformative learning. But it reaches beyond this outcome, sharing how the author aspired to be better at what he valued and showing how he discovered and extended these ideas to others.

Engineering Professionalism

Engineering Practices in Work and Education

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Edited by Ulrik Jørgensen and Søsser Brodersen

The research presented in this book provides analytical frameworks and case studies on engineering practices in education and professional work. The studies are inspired by practice theory as well as science and technology studies. The contributions demonstrate how these practices mutually dependent in co-construction processes in different domains of engineering. In order to demonstrate these essentially dynamic features, the empirical material is aimed at unravelling the interrelatedness of educational and work practices in engineering and analysing them as inherently situated in order to understand how engineering professionalism is produced. The studies are motivated by the following questions:
How can we understand different engineering practices and how do they relate?
Which dimensions facilitate transitions between educational practices and work practices?
Where is engineering professionalism learned and the engineering ‘mindset’ constituted?
How does engineering professionalism change in response to societal challenges?
The studies focus on the responses to societal challenges in education and professional work settings. The outcomes show how engineering has responded to challenges concerning environment, energy, sustainability, design, user interactions, community engagement and entrepreneurship. This has been done through the identification of codes of meaning and the institutions that frame the translation from challenges to professional responses. How these responses are performed within engineering professionalism is crucial for the societal role of engineering.
The concluding chapter synthesizes the answers to these questions and the lessons learned from attempts to develop engineering in the different settings studied. It highlights the linkages among them, drawing on findings and details from the individual chapters as well as the literature in which they are situated, showing how the different sites interact and produce specific representations and frameworks central to engineering professionalism.