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Now in its 13th year, the NILOS Documentary Yearbook provides the reader with an excellent collection of documents related to ocean affairs and the law of the sea, issued each year by organizations, organs and bodies of the United Nations system. Documents of the UN General Assembly, Meeting of State Parties to the 1982 UN Law of the Sea Convention, ISBA, ITLOS, Follow-Up to the UN Straddling Fish Stocks and Small Island States Conferences, Panama Canal, ECOSOC, UNEP and UNCTAD are included first, followed by the documents of FAO, IAEA, IMO, UNESCO/IOC.
As in the previous volumes, documents which were issued in the course of 1997 are reproduced, while other relevant documents are listed.
The NILOS Documentary Yearbook has proved to be of invaluable assistance in facilitating access by the community of scholars and practitioners in ocean affairs and the law of the sea to essential documentation. The entry of the 1992 UN Law of the Sea Convention into force on 16th November 1994 and of the Part XI Agreement - on 28 July 1996, and progress in the implementation of Chapter 17 of Agenda 21, make continuation of this assistance of particular significance in the years to come.
The members of the Yearbook's Advisory Board are: Judges Abdul Koroma and Shigeru Oda of the ICJ, Judges Thomas Mensah, Dolliver Nelson and Tullio Treves of the ITLOS, as well as Rosalie Balkin, Edward Brown, Lee Kimball, Bernard Oxman and Shabtai Rosenne.
Issued annually since 1946/47, the Yearbook is the principal reference work of the United Nations, providing a comprehensive, one-volume account of the Organization's work. It includes details of United Nations activities concerning trade, industrial development, natural resources, food, science and technology, social development, polulation, environment, human settlement, children and legal questions, along with information on the work of each specialized agency in the United Nations family.
Editor: Lyndal Roper
The late Bob Scribner was one of the most original and provocative historians of the German Reformation. His truly pioneering spirit comes to light in this collection of his most recent essays.
In the years before his death, Scribner explored the role of the senses in late medieval devotional culture, and wondered how the Reformation changed sensual attitudes. Further essays examine the nature of popular culture and the way the Reformation was institutionalised, considering Anabaptist ideals of the community of goods, literacy and heterodoxy, and the dynamics of power as they unfold in a case of witchcraft.
The final section of the book consists of three iconoclastic essays, which, together, form a sustained assault on the argument first advanced by Max Weber that the Reformation created a rational, modern religion. Scribner shows that, far from being rationalist and anti-magical, Protestants had their own brand of magic. These fine essays are certain to spark off debate, not only among historians of the Reformation, but also among art historians and anyone interested in the nature of culture.
This book, newly revised and updated, examines the Eastern Church's theology of icons chiefly on the basis of the acta of the Seventh Ecumenical Council of 787.
The political circumstances leading to the outbreak of the iconclast controversy in the eighth century are discussed in detail, but the main emphasis is on the theological arguments and assumptions of the council participants. Major themes include the nature of tradition, the relationship between image and reality, and the place of christology.
Ultimately the argument over icons was about the accessibility of the divine. Icons were held by the iconophiles to communicate a deifying grace which raised the believer to participation in the life of God.
Now in its 15th year, The NILOS Documentary Yearbook provides the reader with an excellent collection of documents related to ocean affairs and the law of the sea, issued each year by organizations, organs and bodies of the United Nations system. Documents of the UN General Assembly, Meeting of State Parties to the 1982 UN Law of the Sea Convention, CLCS, ISBA, ITLOS, Follow-Up to the UN Straddling Fish Stocks and Small Island States Conferences, ECOSOC, UNEP, and UNCTAD are included first, followed by the documents of FAO, IAEA, IMO, and UNESCO/IOC.
As in the previous volumes, documents which were issued in the course of 1999 are reproduced, while other relevant documents are listed.
The NILOS Documentary Yearbook has proved to be of invaluable assistance in facilitating access by the community of scholars and practitioners in ocean affairs and the law of the sea to essential documentation. The entry of the 1982 UN Law of the Sea Convention into force on 16th November 1994 and of the Part XI Agreement on 28 July 1996, and progress in the implementation of Chapter 17 of Agenda 21, to be assessed at the 2002 Johannesburg World Summit, make continuation of this assistance of particular significance in the years to come.
The members of the Yearbook's Advisory Board are: Judges Abdul Koroma and Shigeru Oda of the ICJ, Judges Thomas Mensah, Dolliver Nelson, and Tullio Treves of the ITLOS, as well as Rosalie Balkin, Edward Brown, Lee Kimball, Bernard Oxman, and Shabtai Rosenne.
Now in its 12th year, the NILOS Documentary Yearbook provides the reader with an excellent collection of documents related to ocean affairs and the law of the sea, issued each year by organizations, organs and bodies of the United Nations system. Documents of the UN General Assembly, Meeting of State Parties to the 1982 UN Law of the Sea Convention, ISBA, ITLOS, Follow-Up to the UN Straddling Fish Stocks and Small Island States Conferences, Panama Canal, ECOSOC, UNEP and UNCTAD are included first, followed by the documents of FAO, IAEA, IMO, UNESCO/IOC.
As in the previous volumes, documents which were issued in the course of 1996 are reproduced, while other relevant documents are listed.
The NILOS Documentary Yearbook has proved to be of invaluable assistance in facilitating access by the community of scholars and practitioners in ocean affairs and the law of the sea to essential documentation. The entry of the 1992 UN Law of the Sea Convention into force on 16th November 1994 and of the Part XI Agreement - on 28 July 1996, and progress in the implementation of Chapter 17 of Agenda 21, make continuation of this assistance of particular significance in the years to come.
The members of the Yearbook's Advisory Board are: Judges Abdul Koroma and Shigeru Oda of the ICJ, Judges Thomas Mensah, Dolliver Nelson and Tullio Treves of the ITLOS, as well as Rosalie Balkin, Edward Brown, Lee Kimball, Bernard Oxman and Shabtai Rosenne.
Now in its 17th year, the NILOS Documentary Yearbook provides the reader with an excellent collection of documents related to ocean affairs and the law of the sea, issued each year by organizations, organs and bodies of the United Nations system. Documents of the UN General Assembly and Security Council, Meeting of States Parties to the UN Law of the Sea Convention, CLCS, ISBA, ITLOS, Follow-ups to the UN Fish Stocks and Small Island States Conferences, WSSD, ECOSOC, UNEP and UNCTAD are reproduced first, followed by the documents of FAO, IAEA, IMO and NESCO/IOC.
As in the previous volumes, documents which were issued in the course of 2001 are reproduced while other relevant documents are listed.
The NILOS Documentary Yearbook has proved to be of invaluable assistance in facilitating access of the international community of scholars and practitioners in ocean affairs and the law of the sea to essential documentation. The entry of the 1982 UN Law of the Sea Convention into force in 1994 and of the Part XI Agreement in 1996, as well as of the UN Fish Stocks Agreement in 2001, coupled with the review of the UNCED Agenda 21 the 2002 Johannesburg World Summit, make continuation of this assistance of particular significance in the years to come.
The members of the Yearbook's Advisory Board are: Judges Abdul Koroma and Shigeru Oda of the ICJ, UNDOALOS Director Mrs. Annick de Marffy, ITLOS President Dolliver Nelson and Judges Thomas Mensah and Tullio Treves, as well as Rosalie Balkin, Edward Brown, Bernard Oxman and Shabtai Rosenne.
Now in its 16th year, the NILOS Documentary Yearbook provides the reader with an excellent collection of documents related to ocean affairs and the law of the sea, issued each year by organizations, organs and bodies of the United Nations system. Documents of the UN General Assembly, Meeting of States Parties to the UN Law of the Sea Convention, CLCS, ISBA, ITLOS, Follow-Up to the UN Small Island States Conference, ECOSOC, UNEP and UNCTAD are included first, followed by the documents of FAO, IAEA, ILO, IMO and UNESCO/IOC.
As in the previous volumes, documents which were issued in the course of 2000 are reproduced, while other relevant documents are listed.
The NILOS Documentary Yearbook has proved to be of invaluable assistance in facilitating access by the international community of scholars and practitioners in ocean affairs and the law of the sea to essential documentation. The entry of the 1992 UN Law of the Sea Convention into force on 16 November 1994 and of the Part XI Agreement - on 28 July 1996, as well as of the UN Fish Stocks Agreement - on 11 December 2001, coupled with the review of the UNCED Agenda 21 at the 2002 Johannesburg World Summit, make continuation of this assistance of particular significance in the years to come.
The members of the Yearbook's Advisory Board are: Judges Abdul Koroma and Shigeru Oda of the ICJ, UNDOALOS Director Mrs. Annick de Marffy, Judges Thomas Mensah, Dolliver Nelson and Tullio Treves of the ITLOS, as well as Rosalie Balkin, Edward Brown, Lee Kimball, Bernard Oxman and Shabtai Rosenne.
Perspectives on Rules and Practice
Why do the Member States of the European Union still grant aid and is that aid compatible with the objective of integration which should result in a better allocation of resources? The main purpose of this book is to explain the principles and methods of EC state aid policy in a manner which is both accessible and useful to practitioners and policy makers, by bringing together contributions from officials (both Community and national), industry representatives, and academics. In particular, it examines both theory on the role and objective of public assistance and current practice controlling such assistance. It addresses the issue of state aid from economic, legal and administrative perspectives and offers detailed information on current practice through case studies. It also considers likely future developments in the Community framework of state aid control. Finally, this book identifies major weaknesses in the present system of state aid rules, and paves the way for a proper economic analysis of the effects of forty years of state aid policy in the European Community.
This work, an important bridge between the worlds of science and law, is one of a series, but may be purchased separately. It is one of the most detailed studies thus far on the interrelationship of science and technology with the growing discipline of human rights. Apart from general perspectives, it also deals specifically with the obligations of doctors, engineers, nuclear scientists, computer technologists, genetic engineers, genetic counsellors, mining technologists, and others.
No library of science, medicine, engineering or technology of any description should be without it, for it provides an irreducible minimum of human rights knowledge, without which these disciplines cannot function in the next century with due regard to their social and human rights implications.
Not all scientists will agree with all the author's views, but he poses them challengingly and brings into the open a number of major issues which can no longer be ignored.
The volume is a plea for an interdisciplinary and broad-based approach to scientific problems, scientific education, and continuing education of scientists. It places the scientific endeavour in its overall social and human rights context in a manner which neither students of science nor established scientists can ignore. With an approach which is both imaginative and practical, it explores the future of scientific endeavour in a humanistic perspective.