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East African Community Law

Institutional, Substantive and Comparative EU Aspects

Edited by Emmanuel Ugirashebuja, John Eudes Ruhangisa, Tom Ottervanger and Armin Cuyvers

East African Community Law provides a comprehensive and open-access text book on EAC law. Written by leading experts, including the president of the EACJ, national judges, academics and practitioners, it provides the most complete overview to date of this increasingly important field. Uniquely, the book also provides a systematic comparison with EU law. EU companion chapters provide concise overviews of EU law and its development, offering valuable inspiration for the application and further development of EAC law.

The book has been written for all practitioners, judges, civil servants, academics and students faced with questions of EAC law. It discusses institutional, substantive and jurisdictional issues, including the nature of EAC law, free movement and competition law as well as the reception of EAC law in Partner States.

Christopher E. Bailey

This book examines the existing counter-terrorism laws and practices in the six-member East African Community (EAC) as it applies to a range of law enforcement and military activities under various international legal obligations. Dr. Christopher E. Bailey provides a comparative examination of existing national law for EAC countries, including compliance with obligations under international human rights and international humanitarian law, and offers a range of legal reform recommendations. This book addresses two primary, related research questions: To what extent do the current national counter-terrorism laws and practices of the EAC Partner States comply with existing international human rights safeguards? What laws or practices can the EAC adopt to achieve better compliance with human rights safeguards in both civilian and military counter-terrorism operations?

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Edited by Ogaga Okuyade

The essays in this volume capture the exciting energy of the emergent novel in East and West Africa, drawing on diffe¬rent theoretical insights to offer fresh and engaging perspectives on what has been variously termed the ‘new wave’, ‘emer¬gent generation’, and ‘third generation’. Subjects addressed include the politics of identity, especially when (re)constructed outside the homeland or when African indigenous values are eroded by globaliz¬ation, transnationalism, and the exilic condition or the self undergoes fragmen¬tation. Other essays examine once-taboo concerns, including gendered accounts of same-sex sexualities.
Most of the essays deal with shifting perceptions by African women of their social condition in patriarchy in relation to such issues as polygamy, adultery, male domination, and the woman’s quest for fulfilment and respect through access to quality education and full economic and socio-political participation. Themes taken up by other novels examined in¬clude the sexual exploitation of women and criminality generally and the ex¬posure of children to violence. Likewise examined is the contemporary textual¬izing of orality (the trickster figure).
Writers discussed include Chima¬manda Ngozi Adichie, Okey Ndibe, Helon Habila, Ike Oguine, Chris Abani, Tanure Ojaide, Maik Nwosu, Unoma Azuah, Jude Dibia, Lola Shoneyin, Mary Karooro Okurut, Violet Barungi, Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, Abidemi Sanusi, Akachi Ezeigbo, Sefi Atta, Kaine Agary, Kojo Laing, Ahmadou Kourouma, Uwen Akpan, and Alobwed’Epie

Outline of Swahili Literature

Prose Fiction and Drama. Second Edition, Extensively Revised and Enlarged.

Elena Bertoncini Zúbková, Mikhail Gromov, Said Khamis and Kyallo Wamitila

Outline of Swahili Literature is a major study and reference guide of modern prose and drama in Swahili — one of the largest languages of sub-Saharan Africa. This second edition of the eponymous study first published in 1989, is extensively revised and enlarged. It contains new and updated information, mapping trends and writers. Special attention is thereby given to the developments in Swahili literature that took place in the late 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. All this makes this book a unique source and the most up-to-date study in the field. It is of the essence not only to specialists in contemporary African Studies, but also to a wider range of scholars researching modern literary techniques and modern cultures. Moreover, the book contains a resourceful bio-bibliographical index of modern Swahili writers and an annotated bibliography of all known works in Swahili modern prose and drama published from the late 1950s up to 2008.

Makran, Oman and Zanzibar

Three-Terminal Cultural Corridor in the Western Indian Ocean (1799-1856)

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Beatrice Nicolini

Winner of the Society for Arabian Studies Grant in 2003. This study examines a view '‘from outside’ of the three terminals: Makran, Muscat and Zanzibar which is a partial one in the history of the western Indian Ocean. Such themes are, however, essential when viewed against the background of Anglo-French rivalry in the Gulf and Indian Ocean during the first half of the nineteenth century, and are central to numerous debates. The methodological perspective, therefore, whilst concerned with oriental figures and events, is still largely based on sources in western languages precisely because it concentrates on the relations between Saʾ īd bin Sulṭān Āl Bū Saʾ īdī (r. 1806-1856), the Arab-Omani sovereign of Muscat and Zanzibar, and Europe, and on Baluch presence in Oman and in East Africa.

An Azanian Trio

Three East African Arabic Historical Documents

Edited by James McL. Ritchie and Sigvard von Sicard

This work consists of the translation and annotation of three East African Arabic / Swahili manuscripts together with the original texts. They cover aspects of the history of the coast from the early Himyaritic period up to the beginning of the 20th century. By the use of earlier, in some cases hitherto unused Arabic sources, the authors of the texts have contributed to a fuller picture of the East African coastal history. The texts relate directly to works on East African coastal history that have appeared since the latter part of the 19th century. They are presented against the background of general Arabic and Islamic history. The annotations indicate, and some case stress, significant hints and references to matters that need to be borne in mind, along with archeological and other evidences.

Edited by Eytan Gilboa

This is the first book to focus on media and conflict - primarily international conflict - from multidisciplinary, cross-national and cross-cultural perspectives. Twenty-two contributors from around the globe present original and thought provoking research on media and conflict in the United States, Central America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Russia, and Asia.
Media and Conflict includes works both on the traditional print and electronic media and on new media including the Internet. It explores the role media play in different phases of conflict determined by goal and structure including conflict management, conflict resolution, and conflict transformation.



Published under the Transnational Publishers imprint.

Belief, Ritual and the Securing of Life

Reflexive Essays on a Bantu Religion

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Ruel

This is a book about understanding an African religion that explores the coherence of the religion and the place of ritual in it, but which also looks at the way studying the religion of a very different society from our own throws up questions and helps to particularize the assumptions we make about religion and ideas we have on personhood.
The essays collected in the volume focus upon the Kuria people of East Africa but range well beyond them. Some of the topics explored are: the ordering of society through ritual; 'belief' as a category central to Christianity but misleading in its application to other religions; life-processes rather than the supernatural as the focus for religious understanding; the nature of sacrifice; ideas of the person; cosmology and ritual; conversion; the values of Western individualism as represented in art forms.

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Edited by O'Fahey

The present volume is fascicle A of volume III of Arabic Literature of Africa, edited by J.O. Hunwick and R.S. O'Fahey. The fascicle, compiled by O'Fahey and several collaborators, covers the Islamic writings of Northeastern Africa in Arabic and in several local languages, including Amharic, Tigrinya, Harari and Somali.
Geographically, the fascicle covers the modern states of Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Although the Islamic literature of the region is limited, it includes an important poetic tradition in Somali and Harari and the writings of a major scholar of the colonial period in Eritrea. The volume is divided into four chapters and follows the usual ALA format. It will be followed by fascicle B, which will cover East Africa, especially Kenya and Tanzania.

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Edited by Ulrike Freitag and William Clarence-Smith

This volume covers the long neglected history of Hadhramaut (southern Arabia) during the modern colonial era, together with the history of Hadhrami "colonies" in the Malay world, southern India, the Red Sea, and East Africa.
After an introduction placing Hadhramis in the context of other diasporas, there are sections on local and international politics, social stratification and integration, religious and social reform, and economic dynamics. The conclusion brings the story to the present day and outlines a research agenda.
Many aspects of Indian Ocean history are illuminated by this book, notably the role of non-Western merchants in the spread of capitalism, Islamisation and the controversies which raged within Islam, British and Ottoman strategic concerns, social antagonisms in southern Arabia, and the cosmopolitan character of coastal societies.