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„Viele Wenige machen ein Viel”

Eine Technik- und Umweltgeschichte der Kleinwasserkraft (1880–1930)

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Christian Zumbrägel

Die Wassermühle mit Wasserrad ist heute noch vom Mythos einer vorindustriellen Form der Energiegewinnung umsponnen. Tatsächlich jedoch blieben diese »alten« Antriebstechniken an vielen Bächen mindestens bis in die Zwischenkriegszeit der wichtigste Kraftspender.
Diese »old technologies« (David Edgerton) der Wasserkrafttechnik wurden mit der Verwissenschaftlichung im Turbinenbau und der Elektrifizierung nicht obsolet. An vielen Wasserläufen in den südwestfälischen Mittelgebirgen lagen Einsatzbedingungen vor, die den Betreibern kleiner Hammerwerke oder Drahtrollen noch lange aus praktischen Gründen die Beibehaltung ihrer »alten« Wasserräder nahelegten.
Diese Technik-, Umwelt- und Wissensgeschichte der Kleinwasserkraft fragt nicht wie oft üblich nach dem Neuigkeitsgrad des technischen Wandels, sondern nach der Beständigkeit des Alten und Traditionellen.

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Edited by Timo Koivurova and Sanna Kopra

In the book Chinese Policy and Presence in the Arctic, Koivurova and Kopra (editors) offer a comprehensive account of China’s evolving interests, policies and strategies in the Arctic region. Despite its lack of geography north of the Arctic Circle, China’s presence in the High North is expected to grow in the coming years, which, in turn, is likely to speed up globalization in the region. This book brings together experts on China and the Arctic, each chapter contributing to a detailed overview of China’s diplomatic, economic, environmental, scientific and strategic presence in the Arctic and its influence on the regional affairs. The book is of interest to students, scholars and those dealing with China’s foreign policy and Arctic affairs.

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Edited by Ogaga Okuyade

The essays in this volume capture the exciting energy of the emergent novel in East and West Africa, drawing on diffe¬rent theoretical insights to offer fresh and engaging perspectives on what has been variously termed the ‘new wave’, ‘emer¬gent generation’, and ‘third generation’. Subjects addressed include the politics of identity, especially when (re)constructed outside the homeland or when African indigenous values are eroded by globaliz¬ation, transnationalism, and the exilic condition or the self undergoes fragmen¬tation. Other essays examine once-taboo concerns, including gendered accounts of same-sex sexualities.
Most of the essays deal with shifting perceptions by African women of their social condition in patriarchy in relation to such issues as polygamy, adultery, male domination, and the woman’s quest for fulfilment and respect through access to quality education and full economic and socio-political participation. Themes taken up by other novels examined in¬clude the sexual exploitation of women and criminality generally and the ex¬posure of children to violence. Likewise examined is the contemporary textual¬izing of orality (the trickster figure).
Writers discussed include Chima¬manda Ngozi Adichie, Okey Ndibe, Helon Habila, Ike Oguine, Chris Abani, Tanure Ojaide, Maik Nwosu, Unoma Azuah, Jude Dibia, Lola Shoneyin, Mary Karooro Okurut, Violet Barungi, Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, Abidemi Sanusi, Akachi Ezeigbo, Sefi Atta, Kaine Agary, Kojo Laing, Ahmadou Kourouma, Uwen Akpan, and Alobwed’Epie

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Edited by Rolf H. Bremmer Jr.

Of the many fine scholars who made and have maintained the high reputation of the Dutch Republic in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Franciscus Junius the Younger (1591-1677) is one who has not yet been given the attention he deserves. Born and brought up among the élite Calvinist scholars of Leiden University, he began his career as a theologian. As a consequence of the religious quarrels between the Arminians and Gomarists, he resigned from his office, and went to England where in 1620 he was attached as a tutor and librarian to the household of the Earl of Arundel, an assiduous art-collector. His work as Arundel's librarian resulted in the publication in 1637 of De pictura veterum, a penetrating analysis of the Classical arts. This book laid the foundation of modern art-history. Later in his life Junius devoted most of his time and energy to the study of the Old Germanic languages, culminating in 1665 in the publication of the first edition of the Gothic Bible, together with a Gothic dictionary.
The present volume contains contributions on many aspects of Junius's life, his work as an art-historian, as a Neo-Latin author, his studies of Philip Sydney and Edmund Spencer, and of his Germanic philology. A check-list of his correspondence completes the volume. Contributors include C.S.M. Rademaker, Philipp Fehl, Colette Nativel, Judith Dundas, Chris H. Heesakkers, Ph.H. Breuker, Peter J. Lucas, E.G. Stanley and Rolf H. Bremmer Jr., and Sophie van Romburgh.

Arts Activism, Education, and Therapies

Transforming Communities Across Africa

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Edited by Hazel Barnes

This second volume of research emanating from Drama for Life, University of the Witwatersrand, explores the transformative and healing qualities of the arts in South Africa, Botswana, Cameroon, Kenya, Rwanda, and Zimbabwe. Essays on arts for social change illuminate the difficulties of conflict-resolution (in war-scarred countries, tertiary institutions, and child-offender programmes) to promote broader understanding of diversity and difference. Further essays focus on arts and healing, in which music therapy diagnoses, repairs, sustains, and enhances collective health. Intervention theatre – in prisons, fieldwork, and the ethics and politics of storytelling – is examined as a basis for collaboration with children and youth. The musical theatre traditions of Botswana’s San people are investigated, as well as the benefits of arts counselling with educators to alleviate psycho-social stress in classrooms. Important insights are provided into ways of applying the arts and raise questions of ethics, effectiveness, and apposite usage.
Also treated is the role of aesthetics in the effectiveness of art, particularly in social contexts. Included are overviews of the ways in which the aesthetics of drama have changed over the past four decades and of the cohesive potential of the arts. How can arts practitioners engage in inter-cultural dialogue to facilitate healing? The energy and inventiveness of the playful mode engender new ways of contending with social issues, whereby the focus is on how theatre affects an audience and on how communication in applied theatre and drama can reach audiences more effectively.
These essays provide an insight into the application of the arts for transformation across Africa. Through their juxtaposition in this volume they speak to the variety and purposes of arts approaches and offer fresh perspectives on and to the field.

Germany and Eastern Europe

Cultural Identities and Cultural Differences

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Edited by Keith Bullivant, Geoffrey Giles and Walter Pape

The opening up, and subsequent tearing down, of the Berlin Wall in 1989 effectively ended a historically unique period for Europe that had drastically changed its face over a period of fifty years and redefined, in all sorts of ways, what was meant by East and West. For Germany in particular this radical change meant much more than unification of the divided country, although initially this process seemed to consume all of the country's energies and emotions. While the period of the Cold War saw the emergence of a Federal Republic distinctly Western in orientation, the coming down of the Iron Curtain meant that Germany's relationship with its traditional neighbours to the East and the South-East, which had been essentially frozen or redefined in different ways for the two German states by the Cold War, had to be rediscovered. This volume, which brings together scholars in German Studies from the United States, Germany and other European countries, examines the history of the relationship between Germany and Eastern Europe and the opportunities presented by the changes of the 1990's, drawing particular attention to the interaction between the willingness of German and its Eastern neighbours to work for political and economic inte-gration, on the one hand, and the cultural and social problems that stem from old prejudices and unresolved disputes left over from the Second World War, on the other.

Frameworks

Contemporary Criticism on Janet Frame

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Edited by Jan Cronin and Simone Drichel

Janet Frame’s work is notorious for the demands it makes on reader and critic. This collection of nine new essays by international Frame specialists draws on a range of critical frameworks to explore fresh ways of looking at Frame’s fiction, poetry, and autobiography. At the same time, the essays plug into the energy of Frame’s work to challenge our thinking within and beyond these frameworks.
Frameworks offers a unique perspective on Frame studies today, showcasing its major concerns as well as heralding new Frame narratives for the decade ahead. Mindful of preceding Frame criticism, these essays use their contemporary vantage-point to recast seminal questions about the relationship between Janet Frame’s work and its critical contexts.
Each of the essays makes a case for framing her work in a particular way, but all are characterized by self-reflexivity regarding their own critical practice and the relationship they assume between exegetical framework and Frame’s work. Underlying this practice, and contained within the pun of the title, are the elementary-sounding yet fundamental questions of Frame studies: How does Frame’s work work? And how do we work with her work?

The Enlightened Eye

Goethe and Visual Culture

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Edited by Evelyn K. Moore and Patricia Anne Simpson

Poets, painters, philosophers, and scientists alike debated new ways of thinking about visual culture in the “long eighteenth century”. The essays in The Enlightened Eye: Goethe and Visual Culture demonstrate the extent to which Goethe advanced this discourse in virtually all disciplines. The concept of visuality becomes a constitutive moment in a productive relationship between the verbal and visual arts with far-reaching implications for the formation of bourgeois identity, pedagogy, and culture. From a variety of theoretical perspectives, the contributors to this volume examine the interconnections between aesthetic and scientific fields of inquiry involved in Goethe’s visual identity. By locating Goethe’s position in the examination of visual culture, both established and emerging scholars analyze the degree to which visual aesthetics determined the cultural production of both the German-speaking world and the broader European context. The contributions analyze the production, presentation, and consumption of visual culture defined broadly as painting, sculpture, theater, and scientific practice. The Enlightened Eye promises to invest new energy and insight into the discussion among literary scholars, art historians, and cultural theorists about many aspects of visual culture in the Age of Goethe.

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Edited by Veronica Kelly

AUSTRALIAN THEATRE in the 1990s is a vigorous enterprise displaying the energies and contradictions of a multicultural society. This collection of essays by leading scholars of Australian theatre and drama surveys the emergence and directions of the new theatrical energies which have challenged or redefined the Australian 'mainstream': Aboriginal, multicultural, Asian-Australian, women's, gay and lesbian, community and young people's theatre; and charts the exciting growth of physical theatre. The contributors assess the impact of evolving funding and industrial priorities, and examine the theoretical and cultural debates surrounding Australian playwriting and theatre-making from the 1970s Vietnam dramas to the postmodern present.

Camus, Philosophe

To Return to our Beginnings

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Matthew Sharpe

Camus, Philosophe: To Return to our Beginnings is the first book on Camus to read Camus in light of, and critical dialogue with, subsequent French and European philosophy. It argues that, while not an academic philosopher, Albert Camus was a philosophe in more profound senses looking back to classical precedents, and the engaged French lumières of the 18th century. Aiming his essays and literary writings at the wider reading public, Camus’ criticism of the forms of ‘political theology’ enshrined in fascist and Stalinist regimes singles him out markedly from more recent theological and messianic turns in French thought. His defense of classical thought, turning around the notions of natural beauty, a limit, and mesure makes him a singularly relevant figure given today’s continuing debates about climate change, as well as the way forward for the post-Marxian Left.

This book is also available in paperback.