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Educating Media Literacy

The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education

Series:

Allison T. Butler

Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.

How should I know?

Preservice Teachers' Images of Knowing (by Heart ) in Mathematics and Science

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Kathleen T. Nolan

Elementary preservice teachers’school experiences of mathematics and science have shaped their images of knowing, including what counts as knowledge and what it means to know (in) mathematics and science. In this book, preservice teachers’ voices challenge the hegemony of official everyday narratives relating to these images.
The book is written as a parody of a physical science textbook on the topic of light, presenting a kaleidoscope of elementary preservice teachers’ narratives of knowing (in) mathematics and science. These narratives are tied together by the metaphorical thread of the properties of light, but also held apart by the tensions and contradictions with/in such a critical epistemological exploration. Through a postmodern lens, the only grand narrative that could be imag(in)ed for this text is one in which the personal lived experience narratives of the participants mingle and interweave to create a sort of kaleidoscope of narratives. With each turn of a kaleidoscope, light’s reflection engenders new patterns and emergent designs. The narratives of this research text highlight patterns of exclusion, gendered messages, binary oppositions, and the particle nature and shadowy texture of knowing (in) mathematics and science. The presentation format of the book emphasizes the reflexive and polyphonic nature of the research design, illustrated through layers of spoken text with/in performative text with/in metaphorical text.
The metaphor of a kaleidoscope is an empowering possibility for a critical narrative written to both engage and provoke the reader into imag(in)ing a critical journey toward possibilities for a different “knowing by heart” in mathematics and science and for appreciating lived experience narratives with/in teacher education.

Sue L.T. McGregor

This book shares a collection of novel ways to re-conceptualize and envision the moral imperatives of consumption, thereby providing invigorating insights for future dialogue and intellectual and social action. It privileges a consumer moral leadership imperative, which augments the conventional management imperatives of sustainability, ethics, simplicity and environmental integrity. There are 13 chapters, including first-ever discussions of non-violent consumption, transdisciplinary consumption, consumer moral adulthood, integral informed consumption, conscious and mindful consumption, biomimicry informed consumption, and consumer moral leadership as a new intellectual construct. The book strives to intellectually and philosophically challenge and reframe the act, culture and ideology of consuming. The intent is to foster new hope that leads to differently informed activism and to provocative research, policy, entrepreneurial and educational initiatives that favour the human condition, the collective human family and interconnected integrity. This book strives to move consumers from managing for efficiency to leading for moral efficacy, the ability to use their existing moral capacities to deal with moral challenges in the marketplace. The very core of what it means to be a morally responsible member of the human family is challenged and re-framed through the lens of consumer moral leadership.

The Drama of Reality Television

Lives of Youth in Liquid Modern Times

Series:

Danielle T. Ligocki

In The Drama of Reality Television: Lives of Youth in Liquid Modern Times, the author offers a glimpse into the lives, viewing habits, and opinions of today’s Generation Z. While reality television is quite often viewed as just a guilty pleasure, the conversations that the author had with young people show that reality television is a major pedagogical force in the lives of young viewers.

This is compounded by our current liquid modern time period; a time in which everything is fluid, there are no solid bonds and people are disposable. The author shares the incredible conversations that she had with seven honest, insightful pre-teenagers to give us a deeper understanding of the ways in which just a ‘guilty pleasure’ is working to deeply impact the lives of young people.

Education and Development in Zimbabwe

A Social, Political and Economic Analysis

Edward Shizha and Michael T. Kariwo

The book represents a contribution to policy formulation and design in an increasingly knowledge economy in Zimbabwe. It challenges scholars to think about the role of education, its funding and the egalitarian approach to widening access to education. The nexus between education, democracy and policy change is a complex one. The book provides an illuminating account of the constantly evolving notions of national identity, language and citizenship from the Zimbabwean experience.
The book discusses educational successes and challenges by examining the ideological effects of social, political and economic considerations on Zimbabwe’s colonial and postcolonial education. Currently, literature on current educational challenges in Zimbabwe is lacking and there is very little published material on these ideological effects on educational development in Zimbabwe. This book is likely to be one of the first on the impact of social, political and economic meltdown on education.
Notwithstanding, the book is a valuable resource to policy makers, educational administrators and researchers and the wider community.

Poetic Inquiry II – Seeing, Caring, Understanding

Using Poetry as and for Inquiry

Edited by Kathleen T. Galvin and Monica Prendergast

This volume offers a novel collection of international works on the use of poetry in inquiry that transcends conventional disciplinary boundaries. The aim is to illustrate an ‘aesthetic move’ in social sciences and in particular in health and in education. The collection builds a bridge between the Arts and Health and Education by offering innovative exemplars of use of poetry in social science research and in the context of the many varied disciplinary contexts. An exploration of poetry within an international interdisciplinary collection in the context of education, research inquiry and health and social care with university-affiliated authors is offered. Writers include literary poets, academics and researchers in the arts, the humanities, and human and social sciences: an unusual interdisciplinary community. Authors contribute work illustrating how they are finding varied approaches to make use of the resonant power of words through poetry in their investigations. Writers’ aims span new ways to help readers resonate and connect with findings; new ways of revealing deep understandings of human experience; new ways of being in dialogue with research findings and new ways of working with people in vulnerable situations to name ‘what it is like’. As such, the collection offers examples of the foremost ways seen in the literature for poetry to appear in education, health and caring sciences, anthropology, sociology, psychology, social work and related fields.
Most qualitative research texts focus on one discipline; this text will be relevant for many postsecondary programs and courses including in education, health sciences, arts and humanities and social sciences.

The Collegiate Way

University Education in a Collegiate Context

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Edited by H. M. Evans and T.P. Burt

A college is, at its heart, an association or community of people having a common purpose: in the University context this common purpose is the pursuit of scholarship, at the core of the richest possible development of the whole person.
The point of this book is to share experiences of college life, to identify and spread good practice, to bring together in conversation representatives from the widest possible range of colleges worldwide. Like the ground-breaking conference that preceded it, this book—the first of its kind—aims to promulgate the collegiate way of organising a university, to celebrate our colleges, however different they may be, and to learn from one another. It seeks to continue the conversations and to articulate the benefits of a collegiate way of organising a university.
Establishing and maintaining colleges needs no justification to those who have experience of them—but all who work within collegiate systems are familiar with the need to be able to articulate their benefits to those outside, and to show how such benefits justify the additional cost-base of the collegiate experience. How is this best achieved?
Colleges come in different forms and according to different models, be they constituent parts of a larger university or free-standing institutions. But whatever their constitution, colleges are first and foremost scholarly communities: special and distinct places where people come together as scholars within the setting of a shared community life.

The Art of Collaboration

Lessons from Families of Children with Disabilities

Series:

Katharine G. Shepherd, Colby T. Kervick and Djenne-amal N. Morris

The Art of Collaboration: Lessons from Families of Children with Disabilities, co-authored by two professors of education and a parent of a child with disabilities, draws on the literature as well as original research to explore the meaning of collaboration and the benefits and barriers to developing positive school and family partnerships. The voices and stories of families of children with a variety of disabilities and experiences are at the heart of the book, providing insights into how we might re-conceptualize collaboration as an ongoing process and an “art” built on a shared commitment to improving the lives of children and families. The book begins with an overview of the research on collaboration and explores key themes, including the process of identifying a disability, the meaning of parent knowledge and expertise in the digital age, the potential to join parent and professional knowledge for the benefit of the child and family, and approaches leading to meaningful collaboration and communication. These include a variety of family-centered tools and practices, strategies for promoting parent advocacy and leadership, and a focus on hope and resiliency. Each chapter concludes with questions for reflection and suggested activities, making it an ideal resource for both parents and professionals. Throughout, the authors critique the collaborative process, while focusing on its promises and possibilities for families, educators, and other professionals.

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Edited by Ray Land, Jan H.F. Meyer and Michael T. Flanagan

Threshold Concepts in Practice brings together fifty researchers from sixteen countries and a wide variety of disciplines to analyse their teaching practice, and the learning experiences of their students, through the lens of the Threshold Concepts Framework.
In any discipline, there are certain concepts—the ‘jewels in the curriculum’—whose acquisition is akin to passing through a portal. Learners enter new conceptual (and often affective) territory. Previously inaccessible ways of thinking or practising come into view, without which they cannot progress, and which offer a transformed internal view of subject landscape, or even world view.
These conceptual gateways are integrative, exposing the previously hidden interrelatedness of ideas, and are irreversible. However they frequently present troublesome knowledge and are often points at which students become stuck. Difficulty in understanding may leave the learner in a ‘liminal’state of transition, a ‘betwixt and between’space of knowing and not knowing, where understanding can approximate to a form of mimicry. Learners navigating such spaces report a sense of uncertainty, ambiguity, paradox, anxiety, even chaos. The liminal space may equally be one of awe and wonderment. Thresholds research identifies these spaces as key transformational points, crucial to the learner’s development but where they can oscillate and remain for considerable periods. These spaces require not only conceptual but ontological and discursive shifts.
This volume, the fourth in a tetralogy on Threshold Concepts, discusses student experiences, and the curriculum interventions of their teachers, in a range of disciplines and professional practices including medicine, law, engineering, architecture and military education.

Competition

A Multidisciplinary Analysis

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Edited by Wade B. Worthen, A. Scott Henderson, Paul R. Rasmussen and T. Lloyd Benson

The Super Bowl. Democrats vs. Republicans. Ford vs. Chevy. Bloods vs. Crips. Public vs. private schools. Sibling rivalries. Competition permeates every aspect of our society, and we place great confidence in its ability to allocate resources efficiently, spur innovation, and build personal character. As others have argued, competition is now a paradigm—a conceptual framework that is often taken for granted but rarely challenged. In this book, experts examine competition from their own disciplinary perspectives. From economics to philosophy, biology to education, and psychology to politics, the origins and applications of this paradigm are placed in historical context, its mechanics are analyzed, and its costs and benefits are assessed.
The questions addressed in this book are important and varied. What is the historical genesis of the competition paradigm? How is competition manifest in our culture—in religion, politics, economics, sports, business, and education—and are its effects always beneficial? What can we learn about the mechanics of competition from studying nature? Are humans naturally competitive, or is it a learned behavior? How does competition affect our mental and physical well-being? Is competition the best strategy for allocating finite planetary resources to an expanding human population? The book also engages a cooperative alternative, and asks: Is there an ethical tension between competition and cooperation? Why have cooperative models been undervalued and marginalized? Can cooperation increase innovation and efficiency? This collection provides a broad, insightful, and productive examination of one of the dominant concepts of our time.