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Philosophy, Literature, Culture
Editor: Michael Marder
The goal of the Critical Plant Studies is to initiate an interdisciplinary dialogue, whereby philosophy and literature would learn from each other to think about, imagine, and describe, vegetal life with critical awareness, conceptual rigor, and ethical sensitivity. Literary works featuring plant imagery may be analyzed with reference to philosophical frameworks, while philosophical discussions of the meanings of vegetal life may be enriched and supported with the tools of literary criticism. Another dialogic dimension of the series entails a sustained engagement between Western and non-Western philosophies and religious traditions, representative of the human attitudes to plants. This “cross-pollination” of different fields of knowledge and experience will become possible thanks to the fundamental role plants play in human life, regardless of their backgrounding or neglect.
Ethically stated, the aim of the book series is to encourage an incremental shift of cultural attitudes from a purely instrumental to a respectful approach to vegetal beings. This is particularly important at the current time of the global environmental crisis, when massive de-forestation, seed patenting, and profit-driven agriculture threaten the very future of life on the planet. Not only will works included in the series shed light on the being of plants, but they will also assist us in critically thinking through the crucial issues and challenges of the contemporary world. Bioethics and genetic engineering, of which plants were the first examples; the role of spirituality and holism in the techno-scientific age; the reliance of our imagination and creativity on elements of the “natural” world; global food shortages and sustainable agricultural practices; the roots of our thinking and writing in other-than-human, vegetal processes, such as growth and decay, germination and branching out, fecundation and fruition—books included in Critical Plant Studies will, in one way or another, touch upon these and related themes central to the philosophy, literature, and culture of the twenty-first century.
Thus, we are looking to publish a mix of specialized manuscripts and introductory texts on the theory, literary criticism, and religious or aesthetic appreciation of plant life. Each title in the series will combine at least two of the disciplines listed above, with preference given to cutting-edge methodologies in comparative literature, comparative philosophy, comparative religious studies, etc., and trans-disciplinary approaches. Analyses of plant-related writings and artworks from any historical period and geographical area will be welcome.

The series has published an average of 0,5 volumes per year since 2013.
Continuity and Change in the Baltic Sea Region uncovers the Baltic States’ foreign policy transition from Socialist Republics to EU member-states. Situated between the Russian Federation and Northern Europe, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have had to manoeuvre within an often delicate sub-region. Since independence, the foreign policies of the Baltic States have been dominated by de-Sovietization and European integration. Lying at the crossroads between small state theory and identity politics, this analysis engages with the development of Baltic foreign policies as post-Soviet, small and transitioning states.
The authors argue that Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania dictated their early foreign policy agendas based on a process of identity construction and as a response to their regional environment. This process took the Baltic States from East to West in their foreign policy aspirations. Key factors in foreign policy making and implementation are discussed, as well as external factors that shaped Baltic foreign policy agendas. Overall, the book illustrates how continuity and change in the Baltic foreign policies has been shaped by both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ factors. It is a study in the foreign policies of transitioning states and in this regard illuminates a much larger research area beyond its geographic focus.
The Cultural Politics of Recent Black Artists in Britain
Author: Eddie Chambers
1980s Britain witnessed the brassy, multifaceted emergence of a new generation of young, Black-British artists. Practitioners such as Sonia Boyce and Keith Piper were exhibited in galleries up and down the country and reviewed approvingly. But as the 1980s generation gradually but noticeably fell out of favour, the 1990s produced an intriguing new type of Black-British artist. Ambitious, media-savvy, successful artists such as Steve McQueen, Chris Ofili, and Yinka Shonibare made extensive use of the Black image (or, at least, images of Black peo¬ple, and visuals evocative of Africa), but did so in ways that set them apart from earlier Black artists. Not only did these artists occupy the curatorial and gallery spaces nominally reserved for a slightly older generation but, with aplomb, audacity, and purpose, they also claimed previously unimaginable new spaces. Their successes dwarfed those of any previous Black artists in Britain. Back-to-back Turner Prize victories, critically acclaimed Fourth Plinth commissions, and no end of adulatory media attention set them apart.
What happened to Black-British artists during the 1990s is the chronicle around which Things Done Change is built. The extraordinary changes that the profile of Black-British artists went through are dis¬cussed in a lively, authoritative, and detailed narrative. In the evolving history of Black-British artists, many factors have played their part. The art world’s turning away from work judged to be overly ‘political’ and ‘issue-based’; the ascendancy of Blair’s New Labour government, determined to locate a bright and friendly type of ‘diversity’ at the heart of its identity; the emergence of the precocious and hegemonic yBa grouping; governmental shenanigans; the tragic murder of Black Londoner Stephen Lawrence – all these factors and many others underpin the telling of this fascinating story.
Things Done Change represents a timely and important contribution to the building of more credible, inclusive, and nuanced art histories. The book avoids treating and discussing Black artists as practitioners wholly separate and distinct from their counterparts. Nor does the book seek to present a rosy and varnished account of Black-British artists. With its multiple references to Black music, in its title, several of its chapter headings, and citations evoked by artists themselves, Things Done Change makes a singular and compelling narrative that reflects, as well as draws on, wider cultural mani¬festations and events in the socio-political arena.
Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
Editors: Theo D'haen and Hans Bertens
Postmodern Studies deals with (any aspect of) postmodernism, or of postmodernity and the postmodern in relation to literature.

Publications in this series can be either of a theoretical or a more practical/analytic nature. They may refer to any one, or to several, literary works, genres, or literatures. They may also refer to the other arts, provided the main focus remain literary. In evaluating contributions, the editors of Postmodern Studies will follow no particular methodological or ideological bias.

All manuscripts accepted in the series first undergo a process of peer review.

Due to rapid developments in literary studies we close the series for new publications.
The book series Word and Music Studies is the central organ of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA), an association founded in 1997 to promote transdisciplinary scholarly inquiry devoted to the relations between literature/verbal texts/language and music. WMA aims to provide an international forum for musicologists, literary and cultural scholars with an interest in intermediality studies and in crossing cultural as well as disciplinary boundaries.
Word and Music Studies publishes theme-oriented volumes and monographs, documenting and critically assessing the scope, theory, methodology, and the disciplinary and institutional dimensions and prospects of the field on an international scale.

For specific information on the editing of WMS volumes and style information please visit the WMS Style Guide below.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
The book series Word and Music Studies is the central organ of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA), an association founded in 1997 to promote transdisciplinary scholarly inquiry devoted to the relations between literature/verbal texts/language and music. WMA aims to provide an international forum for musicologists, literary and cultural scholars with an interest in intermediality studies and in crossing cultural as well as disciplinary boundaries.
Word and Music Studies publishes theme-oriented volumes and monographs, documenting and critically assessing the scope, theory, methodology, and the disciplinary and institutional dimensions and prospects of the field on an international scale.

For specific information on the editing of WMS volumes and style information please visit the WMS Style Guide below.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Collective Approaches to Theatre and Performance
Editor: Peter Eversmann
The series Themes in Theatre is published in association with the International Federation for Theatre Research/Fédération Internationale pour la Recherche Théâtrale (FIRT/IFTR) and provides a publishing environment for collective work by its members. Monographs are not considered for this series; it aims at volumes that are characterised by a high level of interconnectedness – each author clearly contributing to a central subject within the field of theatre and performance. The fact that the multiple authors will have discussed the subject and their contributions among each other not only ensures a high level of consistency within each volume but also results in a gamut of approaches and perspectives that nevertheless are centrally focused.
As such the series reflects contemporary issues and current scholarship within international theatre studies. Its main contributors are the working groups of the FIRT/IFTR consisting of specialists working on diverse subjects at the forefront of theatre research. Therefore Themes in Theatre is not limited to any specific ‘-ism’, theatre genre, approach or methodology. As long as academic standards are met and the collectivity of the work is ensured we welcome historical, critical, theoretical, analytical or other subjects that are related to the theatrical arts. However, the set-up of the series is such that it explicitly furthers interdisciplinary work and reflection on concepts and methods.
For information on the FIRT/IFTR, its working groups and yearly conferences, please see the website: www.firt-iftr.org.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature. International Ford Madox Ford Studies has been founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in him. Each volume is based upon a particular theme or issue; each will relate aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time. Ford is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’. These works, together with his trilogy The Fifth Queen, about Henry VIII and Katharine Howard, are centrally concerned with the idea of Englishness. All these, and other works across Ford’s prolific oeuvre, are studied here. Critics of Edwardian and Modernist literature have been increasingly turning to Ford’s brilliant 1905 experiment in Impressionism, The Soul of London, as an exemplary text. His trilogy England and the English (of which this forms the first part) provides a central reference-point for this volume, which presents Ford as a key contributor to Edwardian debates about the ‘Condition of England’. His complex, ironic attitude to Englishness makes his approach stand out from contemporary anxieties about race and degeneration, and anticipate the recent reconsideration of Englishness in response to post-colonialism, multiculturalism, globalization, devolution, and the expansion and development of the European Community.
Ford’s apprehension of the major social transformations of his age lets us read him as a precursor to cultural studies. He considered mass culture and its relation to literary traditions decades before writers like George Orwell, the Leavises, or Raymond Williams. The present book initiates a substantial reassessment, to be continued in future volumes in the series, of Ford’s responses to these cultural transformations, his contacts with other writers, and his phases of activity as an editor working to transform modern literature. From another point of view, the essays here also develop the project established in earlier volumes, of reappraising Ford’s engagement with the city, history, and modernity.