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Series:

P.J. de Rijke

Attractive and richly illustrated publication in which for the first time a complete survey of all printed maps of the province of Friesland (Frisia) is presented. Over a hundred maps from the period 1545-1850 are systematically and extensively described and analyzed. Also attention is given to the producers, engravers and publishers of the maps and the different states of the maps. Each map is depicted in one or more different states. Important work for the history of government of the province, development of the territory and the many varieties and changes in toponyms of the Frisian towns and villages are described in the introduction, preceding the cartobibliography. With summary in English.

Courtiers and Cannibals, Angels and Amazons

The Art of the Decorative Cartographic Titlepage

Rodney Shirley

This book aims to preserve and bring forward for wider appreciation the outstanding works of art that many engraved titlepages and frontispieces represent.
Over the time period covered by the present publication – roughly from the 1470s to the 1870s – very many printed books opened with an attractive decorative titlepage or frontispiece; sometimes both. In this book a limited selection has been made from the extremely wide field of known titlepages, mainly by a focus on subject matter which is primarily cartography, geography, history and topography, together with associated disciplines such as astronomy, travel and exploration. A selection of 100 main and approx. 70 supplementary entries adequately covers specimens of different styles, formats, and national characteristics over a four-hundred year time period from the late 15th century onwards. The choice of decorative titlepages or frontispieces includes examples emanating from Italy, Germany (including Switzerland and Austria), the Netherlands (including Flanders), France, Spain, England and some later examples published in the United States.

Kaarten van de Nederlandse Antillen

Curaçao, Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Eustatius en Sint Maarten tot 1900

Series:

W.E. Renkema

Edited by Paula van Gestel-Van het Schip, Ferjan Ormeling and Peter C.J. van der Krogt

This publication systematically categorizes and provides a nearly complete overview of the great variety of maps, both manuscript and printed, that have been made of the Dutch Antilles. The map descriptions are clarified with information on the creators of the maps and the historical background of the map image. The author has extensively studied how and for which reasons these maps were created. The cartobibliography is preceded by an extensive introduction in which the history of the islands and their inhabitants are described.

In Dutch, with an English summary.

Series:

Edited by Lotte Hellinga

Since the appearance in 1908 of the first volume of BMC the work has been relied on as one of the main authorities on the earliest printing in Europe. Its coverage of early printing from the European countries in which the new technique was successively introduced provides not only extensive bibliographical descriptions, but introduces the material with an analysis of the development of printing in the relevant areas. This final volume to appear in the series covers England, where printing was not introduced until 1476, a good twenty years after the appearance of the earliest printed books in Mainz. The England volume of BMC responds to the special circumstances of early printing in England by giving particular attention to textual transmission, systematically following each text from source or copy to print whenever possible. Printing-house methods of book-production get full consideration. Notes on further dissemination are extended by an analysis of early ownership (and by implication of readership) taking account of material outside the British Library collection. This is followed by a history of the formation of the collection from 1753 in the British Museum, which began with the great collectors of the eighteenth century, and in which the antiquarian book-trade of this and later periods had an important role.
In view of the new focal points of interest the bibliographical descriptions are more elaborate than in the previous volumes, and include extensive notes on provenance and early readers which are the work of Margaret Nickson. A new forensic element is the systematic investigation of paper used by the printing houses until Caxton's death in 1492, when the nature of production changed. This was undertaken by Paul Needham, who contributes a separate introduction on the trade in paper and paper as evidence for dating and production processes. His investigation, together with the evidence of the use of printing types, underlies the new chronological arrangement which has to be the basis for any interpretation. The resulting chronological list of all printing in England before 1501 is presented in separate tables. The work includes descriptions of 323 copies of books, representing 221 editions of items printed in England, out of a total of 395 known to date, extensive introductions and 52 full-size plates accompanying the descriptions of printing types.

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan

A Historical Introduction and Cartobibliography of European Printed Maps of Japan before 1800

Series:

Jason C. Hubbard

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan systematically categorizes and provides an overview of all the European printed maps of Japan published to 1800. The author has undertaken a review of the literature, conducted an exhaustive investigation in major libraries and private collections, analyzed these findings and then compiled information on 125 maps of Japan. The introduction contains information about the mapping to 1800, the typology of Japan by western cartographers, an overview on geographical names on early modern western maps of Japan and a presentation of the major cartographic models developed for this book.

In English with Japanese summary.