Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • All: "presentism" x
  • Hotei Publishing x
Clear All

Time Present and Time Past

Images of a forgotten Master: Toyohara Kunichika (1835 - 1900)

Edited by Amy Reigle Newland

Time Present and Time Past is the first publication in English to treat in detail the life and work of Toyohara Kunichika (1835-1900), who today is considered one of the last Ukiyo-e masters. Kunichika's designs were drawn from established Ukiyo-e genres like Kabuki actor prints ( yakusha-e) and prints of beautiful women ( bijinga), he was however a man of his time and this is reflected in his modern use of colour, composition and subjects. The book includes reproductions of 135 of Kunichika's prints, an extensive bibliography and an overview of signatures and carvers seals.

Series:

Edited by Amy Reigle Newland

Volume 2 of Hotei Academic European Studies on Japan is a compilation of essays covering subjects relating to the artistic environment of the artists and the economic considerations of Japanese print production. The essays are extended versions of the lectures presented at the First International Conference on Ukiyo-e, organized by Hotei Publishing. Contributions by Chris Uhlenbeck, David Waterhouse, Roger Keyes, Shigeru Oikawa, Asano Shugo, Timothy Clark, John Carpenter, Timon Screech, Matthi Forrer, Ellis Tinios and Philip Meredith.

Japanese Export Porcelain

Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Oliver Impey

The Ashmolean Museum's collection of Japanese export porcelain is perhaps the most comprehensive collection in the West. The present catalogue includes only the export wares, the Arita, Ko-Imari and Kakiemon porcelains of the years between about 1660 and 1740, the peak period of the trade. More than 400 pieces are included in the catalogue, each illustrated - some more than once - in colour, with some comparative material. This is probably the largest corpus of Japanese export porcelain published in any single volume, and will be an invaluable source for comparative studies. Many pieces have never been published before.

Mount Fuji

Sacred Mountain of Japan

Chris Uhlenbeck and Merel Molenaar

Mount Fuji has always stirred the imagination of artists. Many Japanese print artists, including some of the greatest like Hokusai and Hiroshige, have attempted to capture the spirit of this mountain in their designs. This book offers an overview of the many faces of Mount Fuji as seen through the eyes of such artists. The introduction focusses on Mount Fuji in mythology, early portrayal, pilgrimage history, and its depiction in Japanese prints - in particular, the work of Hokusai and Hiroshige. The catalogue contains further chapters on Mount Fuji from the Tōkaidō, Fuji and the Chushingura drama, Fuji and poetry (surimono), Fuji seen from Edo (present-day Tokyo) and Fuji: The thirty-six views.

Splendid Impressions

Japanese Secular Painting 1400-1900, in the Museum of East Asian Art Cologne

Doris Croissant

This publication focuses on the collection of Japanese secular painting in the Museum of East Asian Art in Cologne, a large part of which was acquired by the museum’s founders Adolf and Frieda Fischer before 1913. Six internationally renowned specialists of Japanese art present new insights and approaches to pre-modern Japanese visual culture in this exquisitely illustrated catalogue.

The publication is divided into two parts: the first section discusses the reception of Japanese art and the dawn of East Asian art history in Germany, as well as shedding new light on the role of the monk painter as mediator between Chinese and Japanese concepts of secular art.

The main body of the publication is the catalogue section. Here, 94 works (divided into seven subject categories) are presented: hand scrolls, fans, hanging scrolls and folding screens. All works are reproduced in full colour, many scrolls being shown in their entirety. Each chapter is preceded by an introduction, elucidating the historiographical, aesthetic and methodological questions that are central to current research in the visual culture of pre-modern Japan. The illuminating entries are followed by a comprehensive appendices section, including photographs of the paintings’ signatures, seals and transcriptions of the inscriptions in the paintings.
Splendid Impressions will serve as a reference source not only for curators, scholars and students of Japanese art and culture, but also for anyone who has a personal interest in Japanese painting.

Competition and Collaboration

Japanese Prints of the Utagawa School

Joan Mueller

The prolific Utagawa school is one of the most famous lineages of print artists in the history of Japanese woodblock prints. It was founded by Utagawa Toyoharu during the second half of the eighteenth century and remained active in Edo, present-day Tokyo, throughout the nineteenth century. During this period, Utagawa-school artists dominated virtually every genre of ukiyo-e prints, or “pictures of the floating world,” including pictures of beautiful women, prints of kabuki actors, warrior prints, erotica, and landscape pictures. Colorful, technically innovative, and sometimes defiant of government regulations, these prints documented for a popular audience the pleasures of urban life, leisure, and travel. The diverse works by Utagawa Kunisada, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Utagawa Hiroshige, and others reflected the changing social, economic, and political conditions present during the closing century of the Edo period (1615-1868) and early years of the Meiji period (1868-1912).
This 232-page groundbreaking catalogue features full-color images of more than 200 prints from the renowned Van Vleck Collection of Japanese Prints at the Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin–Madison. This collection – a number of which were once part of Frank Lloyd Wright’s personal collection of Japanese prints – is particularly noteworthy for its strong holdings of landscape prints including rare designs incorporating western perspective by the school’s founder Toyoharu. The book includes explicated entries for each work, artist biographies, and five scholarly essays about Japanese print culture and the Utagawa school.

Identifying Japanese dolls

Notes on Ningyō

Lea Baten

Lea Baten's unique and resourceful book assists in the identification of the familiar and unfamiliar figurines known as ningyō, and explores the roots of the word itself. Both meanings, 'doll' and 'human shape', are associated with play and ritual, life and death. These dolls are not necessarily just playthings with pretty faces, but range from mass-produced, trivial toys to true art pieces and imposing ceremonial ornaments. This book investigates the numerous meanings of the 'human shape' in Japanese culture, from pre-history to the present, and explores the many, varied and subtle connotations ningyō have for the Japanese. This book not only identifies and describes ningyō, detailing their history and meaning, but also contains a comprehensive index and one of the most extensive bibliographies on the doll motif ever published in English. Scholarship, clear illustrations, and a touch of humour guarantee a fresh and original approach to known and unknown ningyō.

Heroes of the Kabuki Stage

An Introduction to the World of Kabuki with Retellings of Famous Plays, illustrated by Woodblock Prints

Henk Herwig and Arendie Herwig

Heroes of the Kabuki Stage is written for Kabuki lovers and collectors of Kabuki woodblock prints alike, eager to know more about the interesting images on their prints. The book is a concise introduction to the world of Kabuki, placed in the historical and social context of Tokugawa and Meiji Japan between 1603 and 1912. Several aspects of Kabuki tradition, such as the playhouse itself, the interaction between actors and audiences, as well as the development of plays are explained. The elaborate costumes, make-up and different acting styles are discussed and illustrated. A brief historical outline is given of actor prints and their designers in both Edo (present-day Tokyo) and Osaka. A large section of the book is dedicated to retelling the 37 popular Kabuki plays, set against the background of their origins and supplemented by theatrical anecdotes. Main scenes of the plays and leading actor roles are amply illustrated by woodblock prints produced over a period of more than a century. An extensive index on roles, actors, playwrights, subjects and attributes will enable the reader and print collector to find his way in the spectacular world of Kabuki.

Zeami's Talks on Sarugaku

An annotated translation of Sarugaku dangi with an introduction on Zeami Motokiyo

Series:

Erika de Poorter

This work is a translation by author Dr. Erika de Poorter of the important Sarugaku dangi (‘Talks on Sarugaku’), a collection of comments by the actor, playwright and critic Zeami (1363-1443) as recorded by his son Motoyoshi. Sarugaku is the original term for Nō, the classical Japanese theatre of which Zeami is the founding father. The Sarugaku dangi is generally considered as belonging to Zeami’s transmitted writings ( densho), but more specifically it forms part of his treatises on Nō (Nōgakuron). In addition to two letters and a number of Nō plays, 21 of Zeami’s writings are known today. These writings were been secretly preserved by a few families, and are also called hidensho (‘secretly transmitted writings’) or hiden (‘secret traditions’). These secret texts were discovered and published from 1908, with the last of Zeami’s treatises coming to light in 1956. The Sarugaku dangi is a unique source for the history of early Nō. The present translation, preceded by an extensive introduction on Zeami and his work, is directed at theatre specialists with no knowledge of written Japanese, and is also intended as a reference work for Japanologists.

Series:

A courtesan's day in the carefree atmosphere of the famous pleasure quarter the Yoshiwara in Edo (present-day Tokyo) was carefully planned to an hourly schedule. This sequence of 12 and later 24 hours proved a convenient device for Japanese print artists and their publishers when devising sets of prints showing favourite beauties of the day engaged in daily activities.
In this second volume of Hotei Publishing's Famous Japanese Prints Series, three sets centred on the theme of the hours of the clock in the pleasure quarters are discussed in detail:
• Kitagawa Utamaro's The Twelve Hours of the 'Green Houses' ( Seirō jūnitoki, c. 1794)
• Tsukioka Yoshitoshi's Twenty-four Hours in Shinbashi and Yanagibashi ( Shinryū nijūyoji, 1880-81)
• Toyohara Kunichika's Scenes of the Twenty-four Hours, A Prictorial Trope ( Mitate chūya nijūyoji, 1890-91)
A contextual and visual analysis of these works by the authors provides the reader with an insight into the broader cultural and artistic milieu of the early and later nineteenth century.