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This outstanding work is a manual that enables one to identify pupae, or empty pupal skins, of about two thirds (some 2,600 species) of the Central European Lepidoptera. The text part of about 560 pages comprises a short introduction, identification keys, and species-for species accounts including succinct descriptions of pupal morphology as well as information about habitats, life-style and food plants. The illustration part consists of 271 plates including more than 8,000 line drawings of the treated pupae and/or structural details pertinent for their identification.
Lepidoptera Pupae of Central Europe should be useful for anyone with a primary interest in Central European Lepidoptera. It will also be indispensable for population ecologists studying predators and parasites of Lepidoptera, for soil biologists (since so many Lepidoptera pupate in/on the soil), and for applied entomologists in need of identifying lepidopteran pests without rearing the adults. All families are well covered except for the Nepticulidae and Coleophoridae, for which much basic research on pupal stucture still remains to be done (and whose immatures are usually identifiable from mine architecture/case structure anyway) and a few of the smallest families.
Current developments in Central Europe will have far-reaching consequences on the region’s forestry and related institutional arrangements, such as forest administration, extension services and forest research. Future prospects for the rural population living on income from forestry will considerably depend on how individuals and organisations react in view of these changes. It will be vitally important how forest owners and managers apply new knowledge in forestry and how organisations best deal with the emerging changes. Innovation and entrepreneurship are main driving forces for economic growth, competitiveness and employment creation, especially in rural areas. From 2001 to 2003, the EFI Regional Project Centre INNOFORCE conducted research on innovation and entrepreneurship in forestry in Central Europe, seeking answers to the following questions: What is the situation and perceived future outlook for forestry in the region? How important are innovation and entrepreneurship considered in the sector? How much innovation and entrepreneurship is actually taking place? What are supporting and impeding factors? The research report provides new knowledge on innovation behaviour of forest holdings and forest related innovation systems in Central Europe and on changes that are necessary to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship in the sector. Survey results are accompanied by lessons learned from more than 30 cases referring to innovations in forestry implemented in eight countries.
This monograph deals with the species of the families Nemonychidae, Anthribidae and Attelabidae (Curculionoidea, Coleoptera) of Continental Europe north of 52 ° N and of the British Isles. 50 species are included. For each species a short diagnosis and detailed information on the taxonomy, nomenclature, geographic distribution, life habits, hosts and parasites is given.
The book contains keys from family level to species and is finely illustrated with over 100 black and white drawings, almost all of which are originals drawn by the author and furthermore with four plates showing 35 representative species skilfully depicted in colour by Birgitte Rubæk.
The introductory part provides general information on the taxonomic history, morphology of all life stages, life history and economic importance, comments on phylogeny and classification and some practical hints on how to collect, preserve and identify specimens. In addition lists of hosts and parasites, a catalogue of occurrence by province for the 33 species found in Fennoscandia and Denmark, an extensive list of literature and an index are given.
The main objective of the book is to provide a comprehensive systematic treatment of the North European Nemonychidae, Anthribidae and Attelabidae based on richly illustrated identification keys and descriptions combined with up-to-date information on the distribution and biology of individual species. Volume 34 of this series treated the Brentidae. These volumes thus complete the treatment of the four orthocerous weevil families (weevils with straight antennae) within the superfamily Curculionoidea, and are indispensable for anyone - professional or amateur - working with or interested in weevils.
This is the first comprehensive photo-illustrated guide to the caterpillars of butterflies and macro-moths. The book illustrates over 850 different species, or about 95% of resident, extinct, regular or irregular immigrant species to the British Isles. All specimens are photographed in natural situations upon the relevant foodplants, including many varieties indigenous to continental Europe. Many of the species have never been illustrated as caterpillars before, either by artwork or by photography. This work has received unreserved support from the best and most competent entomologists. Though the book illustrates British species, it is most valuable for lepidopterists all over Europe and especially in North and Central Europe. Never before have so many superb colour photographs of Lepidoptera been brought together in a book. After Preface, Acknowledgements, Introduction, and List of larvae required for photographs, the systematic part with descriptions of the species follows. The text is for each species divided into the following chapters: Larva, with description; Foodplant; Habits, incl. information on how to breed the species. The book should appeal to anyone with an interest in European Macrolepidoptera.
This collection of studies is the result of a six-year interdisciplinary research project undertaken by an international team of archaeologists, historians, numismatists and paleobotanists. It constitutes a completely new approach to environmental, cultural and settlement changes during the Migration Period in Central Europe.
Part One discusses written sources, theories regarding migration, and environmental change in the first millennium AD. In Part Two, archaeological sources relating to Central Europe in the Migration Period are analysed, while Part Three is devoted to new discoveries between the Oder and the Vistula, including traces of Germanic settlement in northern Poland in the early seventh century. In Part Four, evidence for cultural and settlement changes in neighbouring areas is characterized in a comparative light.