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ʿĀrif Nūshāhī

Punjab University Library in Lahore, Pakistan, formerly College Library Punjab University in 1873, acquired its present name when the college gained university status in 1882. Punjab University has some 50 affiliated libraries in various departments, colleges and institutes, with Punjab University Library as its major, ‘central’ library. This library possesses the largest collection of manuscripts in Pakistan and in 2007 their number had reached 14.482 titles in Persian, Arabic and Urdu. Besides a general section comprising manuscripts purchased from or donated by ordinary citizens, the manuscript department contains seven subcollections, acquired from prominent collectors: Āzād, Pīrzāda, Kayfī, Woolner, Shīrānī, Maḥbūb ʿAlam, and Āzar. The present two-volume catalogue, prepared by the well-known Pakistani specialist of Islamic manuscripts, ʿĀrif Nawshāhī, and his collaborators, describes manuscripts in the general section and in four of the seven subcollections. Only manuscripts that were thusfar not or insufficiently catalogued are recorded, with work on the Shīrānī collection still being incomplete.

Series:

ʿĀrif Nūshāhī

Punjab University Library in Lahore, Pakistan, formerly College Library Punjab University in 1873, acquired its present name when the college gained university status in 1882. Punjab University has some 50 affiliated libraries in various departments, colleges and institutes, with Punjab University Library as its major, ‘central’ library. This library possesses the largest collection of manuscripts in Pakistan and in 2007 their number had reached 14.482 titles in Persian, Arabic and Urdu. Besides a general section comprising manuscripts purchased from or donated by ordinary citizens, the manuscript department contains seven subcollections, acquired from prominent collectors: Āzād, Pīrzāda, Kayfī, Woolner, Shīrānī, Maḥbūb ʿAlam, and Āzar. The present two-volume catalogue, prepared by the well-known Pakistani specialist of Islamic manuscripts, ʿĀrif Nawshāhī, and his collaborators, describes manuscripts in the general section and in four of the seven subcollections. Only manuscripts that were thusfar not or insufficiently catalogued are recorded, with work on the Shīrānī collection still being incomplete.

Majālis-i Jahāngīrī

Majlishā-yi shabāna-yi darbār-i Nūr al-Dīn Jahāngīr

Series:

ʿAbd al-Sattār b. Qāsim Lāhūrī

Edited by ʿĀrif Nūshāhī and Muʿīn Niẓāmī

Nūr al-Dīn Jahāngīr (d. 1037/1627) was the fourth Mughal emperor, son of emperor Akbar I (d. 1014/1605) and great-grandson of the founder of the Mughal dynasty, the Timurid prince Ẓahīr al-Dīn Muḥammad Bābur (d. 937/1530). Highly cultivated and a patron of the arts, especially portrait painting, Jahāngīr entertained many artists, literati and other members of the social and cultural elite at his court, where Persian was the dominant language. The author of the present work, ʿAbd al-Sattār b. Qāsim Lāhūrī, was a regular guest for a number of years. A specialist on foreign religions, especially Christianity, he was also present at many of the interreligious debates that were held in Jahāngīr’s presence. Jahāngīr had such confidence in ʿAbd al-Sattār that he not only let him keep a record of his nightly entertainments published here, but also consulted him on what and what not to include in his personal record of his reign, the Jahāngīr-nāma.

Series:

ʿAbd al-Ḥusayn b. Aḥmad al-Sallāmi and Abū ʿAlī b. Aḥmad al-Sallāmī

Edited by Muḥammad ʿAlī Kāẓimbaykī

The present work is not an historical text in the regular sense of the word. It is rather an inventory of as many citations and borrowings in later sources as possible from a text now lost. Written in Arabic, the Akhbār wulāt Khurāsān was started by ʿAbd al-Ḥusayn b. Aḥmad al-Sallāmi (d. 300/912) of Khwār near Bayhaq, whose account ran to the year 289/902, and then continued by his brother Abū ʿAlī b. Aḥmad al-Sallāmī, finishing in the year 344/955. As stated by the author of the present compilation, the work is important in that it is an early history of the governors of Khurāsān which was not written from religious or political motives. A trusted source, it saw at least three abridgements and is cited or used by many later authors, among them Abū Rayḥān Bīrūnī (d. 440/1048), ʿIzz al-Dīn b. al-Athīr (d. 630/1233), and ʿAbd al-Ḥayy b. Ḍaḥḥāk Gardīzī (fl. middle 5th/11th century).

Series:

Anonymous

Edited by Nādara Jalalī

The Saljuqs were a Turco-Muslim dynasty which ruled over Persia and parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from the 11th through the 13th century. After the death of Malikshāh I in 485/1092, the Great Saljuq empire was dissolved among his quarreling descendants, leading to the emergence of a whole series of smaller Saljuq states in Central Asia, Persia, Asia Minor, Syria, and Iraq. In Asia Minor, the Saljuqs of Rūm established themselves definitely with the coming to power of Qilič Arslan I in Konya in 485/1092. The Rūm Saljuqs continued their reign with different degrees of success, unison, and independence from other powers until the beginning of the 14th century. The present present work, a Persian history of the Saljuqs with an emphasis on the Saljuqs of Rūm, was written in Konya, around 756/1355. Rich in information, it is only second to the Mukhtaṣar of Ibn Bībī’s (d. after 1285) Saljūq-nāma.

Khānaqāh

Mathnawi-yi ʿirfānī u akhlāqī bih payrawī az Būstān-i Saʿdī

Series:

Faqīr Shīrāzī

Edited by Manūchir Dānish-Pazhūh

In the history of the arts, emulation has always been important, regardless of time and place. Indeed, even the greatest artists always turn out to have their idols. Emulation is usually a way to acquire a certain skill or style that will then be put to use in the artist’s own, original creations. Sometimes, emulation is such that the work of the original artist is still very present in the later work, mostly as a result of structural or stylistic similarities. In the field of Persian literature, a case in point is Jāmī’s (d. 898/1492) Bahāristān, a work on morals that was written in imitation of Saʿdī’s (d.691/1291-92) Gulistān. Similarly, the present work by Faqīr Shīrāzī (d. 1351/1932) is a successful reproduction of the style and format of Saʿdī’s ethical mathnawī, the Bustān. Still, their content is quite different, Khānaqāh being an ode on mysticism and the Bustān a poem on ethics.

Jawāhir-i tafsīr

Tafsīrī adabī ʿirfānī ḥurūfī, shāmil-i muqaddamaʾī dar ʿulūm-i Qurʾānī wa tafsīr-i sūra-yi ḥamd

Series:

Wāʿiẓ Kāshifī

Edited by Javād ʿAbbāsī

The Qurʾān is a complex text, and it has been regarded as such since the very beginning. Qurʾān interpretation or tafsīr was already practiced by the Prophet’s nephew ʿAbdallāh b. al-ʿAbbās, who used folklore and poetry to interpret his uncle’s revelations. With the passing of time, Qurʾānic exegesis developed from a mere branch of tradition ( ḥadīth) into a full-fledged, independent discipline. The earliest Persian Qurʾān commentary was a translation of Abū Jaʿfar al-Ṭabarī’s (d. 311/923) Jāmiʿ al-bayān ʿan taʾwīl āy al-Qurʾān, made in 345/956. The Persian commentary contained in the present volume was composed in 890/1485 in Herat by Wāʿiẓ Kāshifī (d. 910/1504-05), a prolific author, preacher and mystic of the Timurid era. Originally meant to comprise four volumes, it was discontinued halfway the fourth sura, and is only partially reproduced in the present edition. Kāshifī’s detailed, literary commentary stands out by his unique use of the esoteric properties of letters and numbers.

Series:

Taqī al-Dīn Awḥadī

Edited by Ḏabīḥ-Allāh Ṣāḥibkārī and Āmina Fakhr-Aḥmad

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The present work by Taqī al-Dīn Awḥadī (alive in 1042/1632-33) is a good example of this. Born in Isfahan in 973/1565, as a young man his poetical talent was commended by, among others, the poet ʿUrfī Shīrāzī (d. 999/1591). After some time in the entourage of Shāh ʿAbbās I and a six-year stay in Iraq, he left Persia to try his luck at one of the courts in India. The present work, completed in 1024/1615, was written for a high official at the court of Jahāngīr. It contains about 3500 entries on Persian poets from the earliest times until his own day.

Series:

Taqī al-Dīn Awḥadī

Edited by Ḏabīḥ-Allāh Ṣāḥibkārī and Āmina Fakhr-Aḥmad

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The present work by Taqī al-Dīn Awḥadī (alive in 1042/1632-33) is a good example of this. Born in Isfahan in 973/1565, as a young man his poetical talent was commended by, among others, the poet ʿUrfī Shīrāzī (d. 999/1591). After some time in the entourage of Shāh ʿAbbās I and a six-year stay in Iraq, he left Persia to try his luck at one of the courts in India. The present work, completed in 1024/1615, was written for a high official at the court of Jahāngīr. It contains about 3500 entries on Persian poets from the earliest times until his own day.

Series:

Taqī al-Dīn Awḥadī

Edited by Ḏabīḥ-Allāh Ṣāḥibkārī and Āmina Fakhr-Aḥmad

In Persian literature, tadhkira (‘note’, ‘memorandum’) works are for the most part collections of biographies of poets, combined with selections from their writings. The earliest such work is Dawlatshāh Samarqandī’s Tadhkirat al-shuʿarāʾ (completed in 892/1487), which set a standard for posterity. The tadhkira genre was especially popular in the 10th/16th century and following. The present work by Taqī al-Dīn Awḥadī (alive in 1042/1632-33) is a good example of this. Born in Isfahan in 973/1565, as a young man his poetical talent was commended by, among others, the poet ʿUrfī Shīrāzī (d. 999/1591). After some time in the entourage of Shāh ʿAbbās I and a six-year stay in Iraq, he left Persia to try his luck at one of the courts in India. The present work, completed in 1024/1615, was written for a high official at the court of Jahāngīr. It contains about 3500 entries on Persian poets from the earliest times until his own day.