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Edited by Sean N. Kalic and Aoife Padraigín Foley

Series:

ʿĀrif Nūshāhī

Punjab University Library in Lahore, Pakistan, formerly College Library Punjab University in 1873, acquired its present name when the college gained university status in 1882. Punjab University has some 50 affiliated libraries in various departments, colleges and institutes, with Punjab University Library as its major, ‘central’ library. This library possesses the largest collection of manuscripts in Pakistan and in 2007 their number had reached 14.482 titles in Persian, Arabic and Urdu. Besides a general section comprising manuscripts purchased from or donated by ordinary citizens, the manuscript department contains seven subcollections, acquired from prominent collectors: Āzād, Pīrzāda, Kayfī, Woolner, Shīrānī, Maḥbūb ʿAlam, and Āzar. The present two-volume catalogue, prepared by the well-known Pakistani specialist of Islamic manuscripts, ʿĀrif Nawshāhī, and his collaborators, describes manuscripts in the general section and in four of the seven subcollections. Only manuscripts that were thusfar not or insufficiently catalogued are recorded, with work on the Shīrānī collection still being incomplete.

Series:

ʿĀrif Nūshāhī

Punjab University Library in Lahore, Pakistan, formerly College Library Punjab University in 1873, acquired its present name when the college gained university status in 1882. Punjab University has some 50 affiliated libraries in various departments, colleges and institutes, with Punjab University Library as its major, ‘central’ library. This library possesses the largest collection of manuscripts in Pakistan and in 2007 their number had reached 14.482 titles in Persian, Arabic and Urdu. Besides a general section comprising manuscripts purchased from or donated by ordinary citizens, the manuscript department contains seven subcollections, acquired from prominent collectors: Āzād, Pīrzāda, Kayfī, Woolner, Shīrānī, Maḥbūb ʿAlam, and Āzar. The present two-volume catalogue, prepared by the well-known Pakistani specialist of Islamic manuscripts, ʿĀrif Nawshāhī, and his collaborators, describes manuscripts in the general section and in four of the seven subcollections. Only manuscripts that were thusfar not or insufficiently catalogued are recorded, with work on the Shīrānī collection still being incomplete.

Edited by Ludger Honnefelder, Roberto Hofmeister Pich and Roberto Hofmeister Pich

The scholarly purpose of the volume is to restate and describe the historical reception of John Duns Scotus’ meta-physics, which, by taking the real concept of “being as being” as the first object of first philosophy, laid the ground-work for what scholars have called “the second beginning of metaphysics” in Western philosophy.
Scotus outlined a theory of transcendental concepts that includes an analysis of the concept of being and its prop-erties, and a general analysis of modalities and intrinsic modes, paving the way for a view of metaphysics as a sci-ence of “possible being.” From the fourteenth to the eighteenth century Scotists invented and developed special concepts that could embrace both real being and the being of reason. The investigation of the metaphysics of the transcendentals by subsequent thinkers who were guided by Scotus is the central focus of the present collective book.

Az nuskhahā-yi Istānbūl

Dastnivīshā-ī dar falsafah, kalām, ʿirfān

Series:

Anonymous

Edited by Sayyid Muḥammad ʿImādī Ḥāiʿrī

For those working with Islamic manuscripts the libraries of Istanbul have always been a treasure-trove. New discoveries are frequently reported and of many texts, the oldest or only copy is kept in some library in Istanbul. Since the publication of the defters of the Istanbul libraries in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, many more catalogues and handlists have been produced in an effort to render the immense amount of material more accessible. Even if the bulk of this work is done by Turkish specialists, foreign scholars, too, do their part. The present collection of research notes is a case in point. They describe a number of important Arabic and Persian manuscripts in philosophy, theology and mysticism selected for publication by the Written Heritage Research Centre in Tehran. Some of these manuscripts are in the hand of, or contain marginalia by, Naṣīr al-Dīn Ṭūsī (d. 672/1274), Najm al-Dīn Kātibī (d. 675/1276), and others.

Edited by Tim Fawns

Although humans have always used elements of the environment to help them remember - by carving notches on a stick or tying knots in a handkerchief, for example - there seems to be something quite different, perhaps fundamentally so, about the digital realm. This book is about the challenges and opportunities for human memory and history in an increasingly digital world. Personal, interpersonal, communal, national and global memories are all influenced by cultures of use that form around new technologies. This can be most clearly seen in the voices these technologies enable, the ways in which non-digital activity interacts with digital interfaces, and the tension between recording and remembering the past. Examples, drawn from research across a range of disciplines, show how memory - and the meaning we take from it - is being affected by new practices of recording and sharing information about the present and the past.

A Greek and Arabic Lexicon (GALex)

Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Volume 1 أ to أين. Second, Revised Edition

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Edited by Gerhard Endress and Dimitri Gutas

From the 8th to the 10th century AD, Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic, sometimes through the mediation of Syriac. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first attempt to present in a systematic and rationalized way, with full analysis of the categories describing the grammar of translation, the vocabulary of these translations as each term appears in context, fully cited. It is an indispensable reference tool for the study and understanding of Arabic scientific and philosophical language and literature and its grammar, the vocabulary of Classical and Middle Greek, the transmission of the text of classical Greek works and their reception in late antiquity and Byzantium, and the reception and translation of the Arabic literature based on them in Byzantine Greek. Fully indexed, this second edition of the work supersedes the first with enhanced precision and breadth of coverage and user-friendly philological analysis.

Suzanne Pinckney Stetkevych

Foremost among the poetic accomplishments of the ʿAbbāsid age was the sudden flowering of a highly rhetorical and strikingly modern style of poetry, termed " badīʿ." It found its most radical and controversial exponent in the celebrated panegyrist to the courts of al-Maʾmūn and al-Muʿtaṣim, Abū Tammām Ḥabīb ibn Aws al-Ṭāʾī.
The present study offers a reevaluation of the Arabic literary dispute over Abū Tammām and badīʿ. It then proposes a redefinition of his diwan and of his major anthology, the Ḥamāsah, as a metapoesis that served to decode the poetic tradition of the pre-Islamic desert for the Islamic ʿAbbāsid caliph and his urbane and urban courtiers and subjects, and conversely, to encode contemporary Arab-Islamic political experiences in classical form.
This book is extensively illustrated with original translations.

Al-Risāla al-muḥīṭa

Nuskha-yi khaṭṭi-yi shumāra-yi 5389 Kitābkhāna-yi Āstān-i Quds-i Riḍawī

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Ghiyāth al-Dīn Jamshīd Kāshānī

Edited by Yūnis Karāmatī

Ghiyāth al-Dīn Jamshīd Kāshānī is one of the most outstanding mathematicians and astronomers in the history of the Persianate world. The son of a physician, he was born around 790/1388 in Kashan, where he lived most of his life. Many of his writings were composed in that city, including his famous Zīj-i Khāqānī. In 824/1421 he left for Samarqand, where he played an important role in the construction of the observatory commissioned by the Timurid ruler and astronomer, Ulugh Beg (853/1449), becoming its first director. In 832/1429 he was found dead near this observatory, outside the walls of Samarqand. A violent death is suspected, probably on the order of Ulugh Beg. The present work, completed in 827/1424 in Samarqand, is about the determination of the number Pi. An innovative work of great merit, its exactness was only superseded with the publication of Ludolph van Ceulen’s Van den circel in Delft, Holland, in 1596.

Al-Yamīnī

Fī akhbār dawlat al-malik Yamīn al-Dawla Abi ʼl-Qāsim Maḥmūd b. Nāṣir al-Dawla Abī Manṣūr Sabuktakīn

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Muḥammad b. ʿAbd al-Jabbār al-ʿUtbī

Edited by Yūsif al-Hādī

uḥammad b. ʿAbd al-Jabbār al-ʿUtbī (d. 428/1037 or 431/1040) was a native of Rayy who, through family connections, had entered the administration of the Sāmānids in Nishapur, attaining the rank of postmaster there. After several intermediary engagements he entered the service of the founder of the Ghaznavid dynasty Abū Manṣūr Sebüktigin (d. 387/997) and then, of his son Maḥmūd of Ghazna (d. 421/1030). From the time that al-ʿUtbī was sent as an envoy to Gharchistān in around 390/1000, there is a gap in his career until he offered his famous history of the Ghaznavids presented here to Maḥmūd—also called Yamīn al-Dawla—in around 410-11/1020. Since he was rewarded with a postmastership in the relatively insignificant town of Ganj Rustāq—which he soon lost to intrigue—he must have written this Arabic work mainly as a means to securing a job. Early dynastic history, ornate style, invaluable source of information on the early Ghaznavids.