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Lives in the Balance

Perspectives on Global Injustice and Inequality

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Edited by Lauderdale and Amster

We find ourselves in a world that reflects a tension between the totalizing discourses of global corporate capitalism and representative democracy on the one hand, and the contingent, fragmentary nature of post-colonial life on the other. How (indeed, whether) this dialectic will be reconciled in the new millennium is not merely a question for academic consideration, but has real implications for the lives of people in the 'developing' world who are caught at the interstices of these conflicting forces. What a comparative, critical sociological perspective can provide is a window into the souls of people struggling for self-determination, equality, and justice. It is in this spirit that we present this work focusing on the study of injustice and inequality in the world system.

Suicide and Its Prevention

The Role of Attitude and Imitation

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Edited by Diekstra, Maris, Platt, Schmidtke and Sonneck

In many countries of the world the number of persons that commit or attempt suicide has risen considerably over the past two decades. Particularly among young people suicide rates have increased dramatically, suicide now ranking as the second or third cause of death among them.
The causes of this development have been questioned by health care workers, scientists and policy makers. Although much still remains unknown, it has become increasingly clear that one way in which a society affects the probability that an individual will die by his or her own hand is through the attitudes it adopts towards suicide.
Modern society confronts people more and more often with attitudes and models, such as in the mass media, that express a permissive stance towards voluntary death in a variety of circumstances. Evidence suggest that imitation might indeed play a significant role in the frequency of suicide.
A related aspect is the attitudes care givers entertain themselves towards suicide. This affects both the way in which they approach and treat individuals in suicidal crisis as well as the readiness of these individuals to look for professional help.
The present volume presents an overview of important recent work on the influences of societal and care givers' attitudes on suicide as well provoking premature suicidal deaths.

Edited by Carl Lamberg-Karlovsky, David Pilbeam and Ofer Bar-Yosef

The American School of Prehistoric Research (ASPR) Monographs in Archaeology and Paleoanthropology present a series of documents covering a variety of subjects in the archaeology of the Old World (Eurasia, Africa, Australia, and Oceania). This series encompasses a broad range of subjects—from the early prehistory to the Neolithic Revolution in the Old World, and beyond including: hunter-gatherers to complex societies; the rise of agriculture; the emergence of urban societies; human physical morphology, evolution and adaptation, as well as; various technologies such as metallurgy, pottery production, tool making, and shelter construction. Additionally, the subjects of symbolism, religion, and art will be presented within the context of archaeological studies including mortuary practices and rock art. Volumes may be authored by one investigator, a team of investigators, or may be an edited collection of shorter articles by a number of different specialists working on related topics.

The Control of Fuddle and Flash

A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates

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Jan-Willem Gerritsen

The Control of Fuddle and Flash: A Sociological History of the Regulation of Alcohol and Opiates provides a historical and comparative overview describing the regulation of the use of alcohol and drugs (opiates) in the United States, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. It explains the conditions and causes of the various regulatory regimes, such as the economic benefits reaped from the colonial opium trade and the role that duties on alcohol played in state formation. Moreover, it explores the consequences of different regulatory regimes, e.g. the shift in the supply of (increasingly strong) liquor and the professionalisation of crime, both unintended consequences of American Prohibition. The Control of Fuddle and Flash provides original insights into the political economy of regulatory regimes, and sheds new light on the contemporary debate on the ‘drug problem’.

The Birth of Modern Europe

Culture and Economy, 1400-1800. Essays in Honor of Jan de Vries

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Edited by Laura Cruz and Joel Mokyr

It seems undeniable that Jan de Vries has cast an indelible impression upon the field of early modern economic history. With his rejection of traditional models that left pre-industrial Europe with little to no role to play in modern development, de Vries’ work has laid claim to the rich significance of the early modern period as the birth of the contemporary West. Culminating in The Industrious Revolution: Consumer Behavior and the Household Economy 1650 to the Present (2008), his work has changed the way scholars conceptualize and study this dynamic period, as the contributors in this volume attest. Utilizing the methods and concepts pioneered by de Vries, these authors display the depth and breadth of his influence, with applications ranging from trade to architecture, from the Netherlands to China, and from the 1400s to the present day.

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Edited by Alberto Gasparini

The Walls between Conflict and Peace discusses how walls are not merely static entities, but are in constant flux, subject to the movement of time. Walls often begin life as a line marking a radical division, but then become an area, that is to say a border, within which function civil and political societies, national and supranational societies. Such changes occur because over time cooperation between populations produces an active quest for peace, which is therefore a peace in constant movement. These are the concepts and lines of political development analysed in the book.
The first part of the book deals with political walls and how they evolve into borders, or even disappear. The second part discusses possible and actual walls between empires, and also walls which may take shape within present-day empires. The third part analyses various ways of being of walls between and within states: Berlin, the Vatican State and Italy, Cyprus, Israel and Palestine, Belfast, Northern European Countries, Gorizia and Nova Gorica, the USA and Mexico. In addition, discussion centres on a possible new Iron Curtain between the two Mediterranean shores and new and different walls within the EU. The last part of the book looks at how walls and borders change as a result of cooperation between the communities on either side of them.
The book takes on particular relevance in the present circumstances of the proliferation of walls between empires and states and within single states, but it also analyses processes of conflict and peace which come about as a result of walls.

Contributors are: Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Sigal Ben-Rafael Galanti, Melania-Gabriela Ciot, Hastings Donnan, Anneli Ute Gabanyi, Alberto Gasparini, Maria Hadjipavlou, Max Haller, Neil Jarman, Thomas Lunden, Domenico Mogavero, Alejandro Palma, Dennis Soden.