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Edited by Tamás Demeter

Essays on Wittgenstein and Austrian Philosophy is presented for the 60th birthday of professor Christoph Nyíri. The essays presented here for the first time are focused on Austrian intellectual history, and on Wittgenstein’s philosophy – the two main areas of Professor Nyíri’s interests. Typically, the contributors are outstanding scholars of the field, including among others David Bloor, Lee Congdon, Newton Garver, Wilhelm Lütterfields, Joachim Schulte, Barry Smith. The volume is of primary interest for Wittgenstein scholars and those studying the 19th and 20th century Austrian intellectual history.
As the volume is presented for Professor Nyíri, the papers collected here reflect his interests in Wittgenstein and Austrian philosophy. Beginning with an introductory chapter on Nyiri’s achievements in this field of scholarship, the volume is in four parts. The first part contains essays on Austrian philosophy broadly understood, more precisely on its socio-historical context (Barry Smith and Wolfgang Grassl), on the relation between Marxism and Arnold Hauser’s philosophy and sociology of art (Lee Congdon), and Neurath’s connection to naturalistic epistemologies (Thomas Uebel).
The second part presents Wittgenstein's philosophy in context. Jaakko Hintikka’s paper argues that Wittgenstein’s probable dyslexia can be seen as an external influence on and a source of his philosophy. David Bloor discusses Wittgenstein’s philosophy in the context of Edmund Burke’s conservatism, which can be read as a background of Nyiri’s influential interpretation of Wittgenstein as a conservative philosopher. Newton Garver also touches on the problem of conservatism while discussing passages of On Certainty in the context of Kant, Moore, and T.S. Eliot. Klaus Puhl’s essay connects Wittgenstein’s remarks on rule-following to Freud’s concept of retroactivity, and argues that rules emerging from empirical regularities can be seen as retroactive constructions.
The papers in the third part of the volume offer close readings of Wittgenstein’s works. Rudolf Lüthe offers two readings of Wittgenstein’s criticism of philosophy in the Tractatus can be read in two ways with different consequences, among them is the appearance of philosophy inspired by art rather than the sciences. Joachim Schulte offers an interpretation of Wittgenstein’s use of ’natural history’ that can accommodate all of his remarks containing this concept. Herbert Hrachovec discusses the relation of pictorial and linguistic representations in Wittgenstein’s Nachlass, arguing that there is no pronounced opposition between the two.
The forth part of the book, containing three papers in German, continues the close inspection of Wittgenstein’s later works. Wilhelm Lütterfelds reconstructs Wittgenstein’s philosophy of time as pointing out memory being the very source of time. Katalin Neumer inspects Wittgenstein’s frequent references to photographs in the context of aspect-seeing and compares them with other remarks on theatre, painting, and music. She concludes that there are no philosophically important structural differences between them. Peter Keicher’s paper offers a comprehensive view on Wittgenstein’s prefaces in the context of his various book-projects.
The volume ends with a select bibliography of Professor Nyiri’s works.

The House of Our Ancestors

Precedence and Dualism in Highland Balinese Society

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Thomas Reuter

The House of Our Ancestors is a study of the Mountain Balinese or Bali Aga, an ethnic group with a distinct history and culture who are thought to be the indigenous people of Bali, Indonesia. In popular ideas of Balinese identity, the highland people feature as the conceptual counterpart to the royal houses established in the southern lowlands of the island. Hidden in shadow of this courtly culture, the world of the highland Balinese has been largely ignored even though Bali counts among the most researched localities in the world. This book explores their social organization and status economy from the perspective of an innovative theory of ‘precedence’. Regional domains, villages and origin houses among the Bali Aga are all conceived and ranked in reference to the basic ideas of a sacred origin in the past, and of an order of precedence connecting the past with the present. The analysis of precedence ranking, evident at all levels of Bali Aga social organization, leads to the development of a new theory of status for Austronesian societies that departs radically from the notion of hierarchy as proposed by Louis Dumont in his classic study of the Indian caste system.

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J. Rousseau

Kayan Religion is an ethnographic account of the rituals and beliefs of Central Borneo swidden agriculturists, written at the request of the Baluy Kayan of Sarawak to preserve their religion for future generations. With its extensive agricultural rituals, Kayan religion is organized around the agricultural cycle. Both priests and shamans are present; the latter limit themselves to curing rituals, while priests manage the annual cycle, life-cycle rituals, and familial rituals.
Like other groups in Southeast Asia, the Kayan have elaborate death rituals. The traditional Kayan religion ( adat Dipuy) was characterized by ritual head-hunting, animal omens, and a multiplicity of taboos. In the 1940s, a prophet revealed a new religion ( adat Bungan) in Central Borneo, with particular success in the Baluy area. In its initial stage, adat Bungan was a radical rejection of the old religion. However, in just a few years, a kind of counter-reformation occurred, led by aristocrats and priests, who reinstated most of the old rituals in a simplified and less onerous form.

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Edited by Daniel Riha and Anna Maj

This book aims to present how emergent media penetrate all fields of human cultural activity. The content of this volume reflects theoretical and practical discussions on cultural issues influenced by increased adoption of information and communication technologies. New media and Web 2.0 raise increasing attention of academics from wide range of disciplines. Papers, included in this volume, cover a coherent choice of topics selected with respect to the actual state of inter-disciplinary debate on emerging media.

Weaponized Whiteness

The Constructions and Deconstructions of White Identity Politics

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Fran Shor

Weaponized Whiteness by Fran Shor interrogates the meanings and implications of white supremacy and, more specifically, white identity politics from historical and sociological perspectives. By analyzing the constructions and deconstructions of white identity politics throughout U. S. history and up through the present, these collected essays provide insight into the deep roots and resonances of white identity politics and the challenges that have emerged, in particular, since the 1960s.

Edited by Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Yosef Gorny and Judit Bokser Liwerant

This series brings together contributions addressing the question of the unity versus conflict, closeness versus alienation, and convergence versus divergence entrenched in the infinite variety of collective identities illustrated by Jews in this era. The titles included investigate—each volume under its own angle—the principles, narratives, visions and commands which constitute in different places the essentials of Jewishness. As a rule, they ask whether or not one is still allowed to speak, at the beginning of this new century, of one—single and singular—Jewish People. Hence, this series is a podium for researchers of Judaism and the Jewish condition all over the world—from Israel to the United States, and from there to Argentina and Brazil as well as Russia, Ukraine or France, England and Germany. These investigations should yield an understanding of how far Judaism is still one while Jewishness is multifarious. The perspectives offered may draw from sociology and the social sciences as well as from history and the humanities in general. This series aspires to constitute a meeting point for them all. It will be of interest not only to scholars in Jewish Studies but also to anyone interested in the theory and practice of major phenomena of our time like transnational diasporas, the globalization of ethnicity, and present-day relations of religiosity and laicity which, in one way or another, are akin to the preoccupations of researchers in the field of Jewish identities.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Carnap and the Vienna Circle

Empiricism and Logical Syntax

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Ramon Cirera

It is not inacurate to say that from 1928 to 1936 Carnap was a member of the Vienna Circle, even though during this period he was not always present in Vienna. During this years, which spanned roughly the period from the Aufbau to Testability and Meaning, he worked or at least discussed frequently with the members of the group. However, traditionally it has been difficult to form a proper view of the development of Carnap's ideas throughout this period, mainly because of three errors which have persisted in the commonly accepted historical interpretation of Carnap and the Vienna Circle: emphasis on the Circle as a unit rather than a collective of individuals; insistence on verificationism as the defining characteristic of Logical Positivism; and the systematic abstraction of the work of the Circle from its historical context. As against this historically distorted image, this book argues for an alternative reading, evaluating the different influences on Carnap of Schlick, Wittgenstein, Neurath and Popper, and making sense of Carnap's evolution from physicalism to phenomenalism and the syntactic point of view.

Framing Indonesian Realities

Essays in Symbolic Anthropology in Honour of Reimar Schefold

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Edited by Peter J.M. Nas and G.A. Persoon

Ritual language, wild and domestic animals, and objects of material culture like houses, palaces, and works of art, are often loaded with symbolic meaning. ‘Reading the landscape’, or giving meaning to the natural environment, is a cultural act as well, and one must discover what mountains, coastlines, and islands mean to different groups of people. In this book, written on the occasion of Professor Reimar Schefold’s retirement from the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Leiden University, colleagues and former students from the Netherlands and abroad demonstrate the variety and wealth of the field of symbolic anthropology.
The regional focus of the book is Indonesia. The studies presented range from small island communities in western, northern, and eastern Indonesia to urban settlements in Java and Sumatra. All the contributions are in one way or another related to Reimar Schefold’s work over the past thirty-five years, work that includes extensive studies on material culture, rituals, and the use of symbols in the expression of ethnicity among the various cultural groups of Indonesia.

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Carmen Ana Pont

Les Songes et les sorts, réponse yourcenarienne au journal intime, a été jusqu'à ce jour presque oublié par la critique. Le présent ouvrage comble cette lacune en démontrant que la teneur autobiographique et le style de ces transcriptions oniriques, qui accompagnèrent Yourcenar pendant un demi-siècle, illuminent l'ensemble de son œuvre. Car le rêve rencontre la double poétique de l'aveu yourcenarien: le désir de se cacher et celui de se raconter. La stratégie de l'ambiguïté, qui découle de ce paradoxe, brouille l'histoire du songe et celle de l'auteur, efface les limites du texte littéraire par le biais de l'intertextualité, et confond rêve et vie, réel et imaginaire, écrivain et personnage.
Ainsi, le songe, thème, acte, style, langage, métaphore et prétexte, ouvre un univers de correspondances où romantisme, baroque et mythologie se joignent aux mythes personnels de l'auteur pour nous dévoiler quelques secrets et pièges de l'écriture. Oscillant entre l'image de l'écrivain qui met en scène la mort symbolique de l'amour ( Songes de 1938), et celle du créateur vieilli qui redoute la mort physique de l'être aimé (Dossier de 1991), cette étude nous révèle une Yourcenar fragile et inattendue, qui rêve pour résister et faire face à sa propre mortalité.

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Edited by Walter Schönau and Henk Hillenaar

Who of us, as a child, has not dreamed of having other parents: a gentler mother, a kinder or stronger father, a more illustrious family? According to our secret dreams, were not most of us born sons or daughters of a king, a president, a champion? Freud termed this the Family Romance. We all carry these secret scenarios in ourselves. Usually they are long forgotten but nevertheless remain alive in the stories we tell ourselves and relate to others. Therefore the Family Romance is one of the keys to the understanding of literature. The French literary critic Marthe Robert developed in an original way this simple but fundamental theory of Freud. In 1972 she presented in her now famous publication Origins of the Novel a new method to analyse the novel and to understand its history. Her study offers such a convincing and lively proof of the relevance of Freud's views that it still invites us to expand on its ideas and suggestions, to elaborate, develop and, if necessary, correct them. It is in this perspective that the authors of this volume write about the historical and mythical figures Mary, Medea, Electra, Kaspar Hauser and Sir Gawain. Other articles are devoted to the Family Romance in the works of the following authors: Barthes, Beckett, Camus, Drieu la Rochelle, Faulkner, Flaubert, Goethe, Claire Goll, Gombrowicz, Greene, Kafka, Lévy, Modiano, Petronius, Sartre, Vigny.