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Edited by Gerald Kulm

This book presents a coherent collection of research studies on teacher knowledge and its relation to instruction and learning in middle-grades mathematics. The authors provide comprehensive literature reviews on specific components of mathematics knowledge for teaching that have been found to be important for effective instruction. Based on the analysis of video data collected over a six-year project, the chapters present new and accessible research on the learning of fractions, early concepts of algebra, and basic statistics and probability.

The three sections of the book contain chapters that address research on the development of mathematics knowledge for teaching at the undergraduate level, instructional practices of middle-grades teachers, and the implications of teacher knowledge of mathematics for student learning. The chapters are written by members of a research team led by the Editor that has been working for the past six years to develop practical and useful theories and findings on variables that affect teaching and learning of middle grades mathematics.

Mathematics knowledge for teaching is a topic of great current interest. This book is a valuable resource for mathematics education researchers, graduate students, and teacher educators. In addition, professional developers and school district supervisor and curriculum leaders will find the concrete examples of effective teaching strategies useful for teacher workshops.

Philip W. Jones

The book tells the story of the World Bank’s involvement in education, for which lending began in 1963. The study considers how the nature of the Bank as a financial institution has shaped its view of development and globalisation, and how education relates to these. The book examines the reasons why the Bank is involved in education, its education policy stances, the nature and impact of its projects and lending programs, and the Bank as an agent of globalisation. Bank work in education is hugely controversial. All around the world, in industrial countries, in transition economies, and in the poorest countries, the Bank continues to be under fire for its policy prescriptions and its modes of operation. From both left and right, the Bank is a major target of discontent. In the popular imagination, the impact of globalisation and the Bank’s shaping of such fields as education in accordance with neo-liberal and market prescriptions are prime sources of unease. At the same time, the Bank is frequently misunderstood and misrepresented. This book is based on the author’s unique access to the Bank—its files, staff and working documents—over nearly 20 years. The work is based on access to thousands of classified Bank documents and on a large number of interviews with past and present Bank officials. Therefore, while critical of many features the Bank, the book will be recognised as an authoritative guide to Bank policy formation in education.

Challenges Bequeathed

Taking up the challenges of Dwayne Huebner

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Edited by Patrick J. Lewis and Jennifer Tupper

In this thoughtful and provocative collection of essays, a group of scholars from varied backgrounds and interests have each taken up the educational challenges bequeathed by Dwayne Huebner in his 1996 essay, “Challenges Bequeathed”.
Huebner encouraged educators to surpass the technical foundations of education, affirm the significance of the imagination, use the world’s intellectual traditions and achievements, engage in public discourse about education, and speak out for children and youth. Each author has extended, and in some ways transcended, the discussion of these five challenges yet still draw upon the considerable contribution Dwayne Huebner has made to the field of education.
The writers in this volume grapple with the complexities of teaching and learning as always in process and as always relational; of schools as sites of creative and imaginative acts of knowing and being.
The book begins with Huebner’s 1996 essay wherein he delineates the challenges for educators, as he perceived them. Readers are invited to begin with this chapter. However, after taking in Professor Huebner’s “prescience, his ability to see, years in advance of everyone else, what is deeply at work in present times, where it is headed, and what needs to be done about it…” (Smith, this volume) we encourage readers to dip into this volume randomly rather than in sequential order. While doing so, it is important to be mindful that “these challenges do not exist in isolation of each other; rather they are inextricably linked in myriad ways. Each one of these challenges requires consideration of classroom spaces, the individuals who occupy these spaces, and how these spaces are influenced by external forces” (Tupper, this volume).
We invite you to take up a challenge.

Totems and Taboos

Risk and Relevance in Research on Teachers and Teaching

Edited by Jeanne Adèle Kentel and Andrew Short

Totems and Taboos: Risk and Relevance in Research on Teachers and Teaching, is a compilation of selected papers from the 2007 Biennial conference of the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching (ISATT), held at Brock University. This volume contains keynote addresses and papers based on thematic presentations delivered at the conference; namely, critically investigative items which have been sacred to systems, institutions, and educational practitioners, in order to inform the theory and practice of teaching and research. While consideration of the native or aboriginal historical tradition of Canada was instrumental in developing a theme dealing with the nature of totems, it was recognized that such a heritage informs research and practice regardless of national borders. The papers included in this book reflect global perspectives on the conference theme and include thinkers from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Slovenia, Turkey, and the United States. In addition the writings of seasoned academics and well published authors, the totems of the field so to speak are situated alongside papers from academic newcomers who have broken the taboo of not speaking in the presence of more experienced company.

The central metaphor of this book is the high wire or tightrope journey across Niagara Falls upon which we oscillate between the falsely dichotomous notions of research and teaching. The tension in leaning towards one side or the other is presented as a negotiated process of balancing research and teaching which maintains our progress forward in the field. Overlooking this edgy relationship will cause one to lean too much in one direction and fall into the chasm underneath. Thus the sections of this book are designed to examine educational progress across this high wire while maintaining awareness of the risks taken on this journey. Each paper is relevant to particular phases in this high wire walk and portrays the journeys of the authors within in order to inform the path of others.

Educated Fear and Educated Hope

Dystopia, Utopia and the Plasticity of Humanity

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Marianna Papastephanou

Beyond dominant tendencies to contrast utopia and ideology, the book reconceptualizes utopia and approaches it along with the notion of dystopia. The interplay of utopia and dystopia is examined, some major anti-utopian arguments are refuted and a new utopianism emerges, one that radicalizes critique and makes engagement with present global realities more pressing.
Educated fear, i.e., a critical awareness of dystopian realities, and educated hope, i.e., a critical awareness of the possibility of human perfectibility cohabit a theoretical space that breaks with utopianist modern theoretical underpinnings and becomes historically and spatially more inclusive, while retaining the motivational and justificatory force of ethical imagery. If education is not just an institution of unreflective socialization, if it is about futurity, it has to renegotiate utopian thought. As the interest in utopia is being renewed both in general philosophy and philosophy of education and as dystopia is still neglected, a book that re-defines utopianism and explores for the first time the role of dystopia in radicalizing educational demands for systemic change is indispensable for Utopian Studies, Philosophy and Philosophy of Education academics and students alike.
The title of the book is first transliterated into Utopia, a typeface in which Brazilian artists Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain replace capital letters with the iconic buildings of Brazil´s foremost modernist architect, Oscar Niemeyer, whilst lower-case letters are equated with urban interferences such as fences, skateboarders, CCTV cameras, electricity cables, in short, all those elements that escaped the utopian dream of the architect. To me, it bears associations of the philosophical notion of counterfactuality and of Adorno´s notion of mimesis. The title is then transliterated into Helvetica Concentrated (a digital typeface that concentrates the surface of Helvetica characters in dots which has been created by Detanico and Lain in collaboration with Jiri Skala). The term Helvetica bears the associations of a modernist utopia of success, performativity, prosperity, predictability, rational planning and uniformity.

Fostering Scientific Habits of Mind

Pedagogical Knowledge and Best Practices in Science Education

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Edited by Issa M. Saleh and Myint Swe Khine

The history of human development records the courageous efforts made by the generation of teacher educators to train the school leaders who are responsible to implement educational policies. They have endured the burden and challenges of the times and refine the pedagogies and education systems with many innovative approaches. As the world faces increasing uncertainties and shift to knowledge economy, education plays a larger role in creating productive persons. Designing and managing learning school organizations that can sustain a competitive advantage in this fast-changing environment demands transformative leaders who would envision building intellectual capital for the future. Many books on teacher education, educational management and leadership exist in the past. But most books do not keep up with the fast-changing educational scene and only a few include future scenarios. This book presents anticipated trends and demands of the new knowledge economy, achieving goals with the use of various tools, generative and collaborative efforts, increasing leadership capability in dynamic and complex contexts, enculturation of cutting edge knowledge for educational advancement and creation of teams that focus learning organizations.
The book brings together prominent and leading teacher educators and researchers from around the world to present their scholarship, theories and practice, case studies, state-of-the- art approaches and future-oriented predictions. This book embodies collective knowledge inquiry and represents professional conversations. The chapters provides information on recent trends and development in teacher education, the important role of educational management and leadership in educational transformations, promising practices for desired outcomes. The book is a critical and specialized resource that describes how transformative leadership can play an important role in achieving excellence in education. The topics are covered in the book are: educational leadership and effective teaching, research in transformational leadership, and professional development and social capital building in schools.

Transformative Leadership and Educational Excellence

Learning Organizations in the Information Age

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Edited by Myint Swe Khine and Issa M. Saleh

On records, the evolution of human development pays a considerable tribute to the relentless efforts made by generations of teacher educators set out to train academic leaders and teachers committed to the implementation of educational policies parallel to the mental edification of young students. Teacher educators, faced the challenges, overcame the obstacles, and refined the pedagogies of our educational system with many innovative approaches. As the world faces increasing uncertainties and adamant shifts of knowledge economy, it is apparent that education plays an ultimate role in creating adept and geared up citizens, to lead the way to the future. Designing and managing learning school organizations that can sustain a competitive advantage in this fast-changing environment demands transformative leaders primed and ready to the building or our intellectual capital for the future. Many books on teacher education, educational management and leadership have been written in the past, but most of them do not keep up with the fast-changing educational scene and only a few include future scenarios. This book presents the anticipated trends and demands of the new knowledge economy, and it aims to achieve its goals with the use of various tools, generative and collaborative efforts, increasing leadership capability in dynamic and complex contexts, enculturation of cutting edge knowledge for educational advancement and creation of teams that focus learning organizations.
This book brings together prominent and leading teacher educators and researchers from around the world to present their scholarship, theories and practice, case studies, state-of-the- art approaches and upshot predictions. This book embodies collective knowledge inquiry and represents professional conversations. The chapters provides information on recent trends and development in teacher education, the important role of educational management and leadership in educational transformations and promising practices for desired outcomes. The book is a critical and specialized resource that describes how transformative leadership can play an important role in achieving excellence in education. The topics covered are: Educational Leadership and Effective Teaching, Research in Transformational Leadership, and Professional Development and Social Capital Building in Schools.

Muslim Voices in School

Narratives of Identity and Pluralism

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Edited by Özlem Sensoy and Christopher Darius Stonebanks

This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West.
The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.
This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.
WINNER! of the National Association for Multicultural Education’s 2010 Philip C. Chinn book award!

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

Global Citizenship Education

Philosophy, Theory and Pedagogy

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Edited by Michael A. Peters, Alan Britton and Harry Blee

The essays in this edited collection argue that global citizenship education realistically must be set against the imperfections of our contemporary political realities. As a form of education it must actively engage in a critically informed way with a set of complex inherited historical issues that emerge out of a colonial past and the savage globalization which often perpetuates unequal power relations or cause new inequalities. The essays in the book explore these issues and the emergent world ideologies of globalism, as well as present territorial conflicts, ethnic, tribal and nationalist rivalries, problems of increasing international migration and asylum, growing regional imbalances and increasing world inequalities. Contributors to this collection, each on their own way, argues that global citizenship education needs to project new values, to reality test and debate the language, concepts and theories of global citizenship and the proto-world institutions that seek to give expression to nascent aspirations for international forms of social justice and citizen participation in world government. Many of the contributors argue that global citizenship education offers the prospect of extending the liberal ideologies of human rights and multiculturalism, and of developing a better understanding of forms of post-colonialism. One thing is sure, as the essays presented in this book demonstrate so clearly, there can be no one dominant notion of global citizenship education as notions of ‘global’, ‘citizenship’ and ‘education’ are all contested and open to further argument and revision. Global citizenship education does not name the moment of global citizenship or even its emergence so much as the hope of a form of order where the rights of the individual and of cultural groups, irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity or creed, are observed, preserved and protected by all governments in order to become the basis of citizen participation in new global spaces that we might be tempted to call global civil society.