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Edited by Maria Zadencka, Andrejs Plakans and Andreas Lawaty

The studies in East and Central European History Writing in Exile 1939-1989, all written by experts in the history of the region, give answers to the comprehensive question of how the experience of exile during the time of the Nazi and Communist totalitarianism influenced and still influences history writing and the historical consciousness both in the countries hosting exile historians, as well as in the home countries which these historians left.

The volume comprises difficult-to-access information about the organization and the work of historians exiled from the Baltic States, including Baltic Germans, Belorusia, Ukraine, and Poland. And it provides reflections on the intellectuals networking between their own national and the foreign traditions in the exile.

Contributors are: Olavi Arens, Mirosław Filipowicz, Jörg Hackmann, Volodymyr Kravchenko, Oleg Łatyszonek, Andreas Lawaty, Iveta Leitāne, Artur Mękarski, Andrzej Nowak, Gert von Pistohlkors, Andrejs Plakans, Toivo Raun, Rafał Stobiecki, Mirosław A. Supruniuk, Jaan Undusk, and Maria Zadencka.

After the Soviet Empire

Legacies and Pathways

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Edited by Sven Eliaeson, Lyudmila Harutyunyan and Larissa Titarenko

The break-up of the Soviet Union is a key event of the twentieth century. The 39th IIS congress in Yerevan 2009 focused on causes and consequences of this event and on shifts in the world order that followed in its wake. This volume is an effort to chart these developments in empirical and conceptual terms. It has a focus on the lands of the former Soviet Union but also explores pathways and contexts in the Second World at large.
The Soviet Union was a full scale experiment in creating an alternative modernity. The implosion of this union gave rise to new states in search of national identity. At a time when some observers heralded the end of history, there was a rediscovery of historical legacies and a search for new paths of development across the former Second World.
In some parts of this world long-repressed legacies were rediscovered. They were sometimes, as in the case of countries in East Central Europe, built around memories of parliamentary democracy and its replacement by authoritarian rule during the interwar period. Some legacies referred to efforts at establishing statehood in the wake of the First World War, others to national upheavals in the nineteenth century and earlier.
In Central Asia and many parts of the Caucasus the cultural heritage of Islam in its different varieties gave rise to new markers of identity but also to violent contestations. In South Caucasus, Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan have embarked upon distinctly different, but invariably contingent, paths of development. Analogously core components of the old union have gone through tumultuous, but until the last year and a half largely bloodless, transformations. The crystallization of divergent paths of development in the two largest republics of that union, i.e. Russia and Ukraine, has ushered in divergent national imaginations but also in series of bloody confrontations.

Claiming the Dispossession

The Politics of Hi/storytelling in Post-imperial Europe

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Vladimir Biti

With the Treaty of Versailles, the Western nation-state powers introduced into the East Central European region the principle of national self-determination. This principle was buttressed by frustrated native elites who regarded the establishment of their respective nation-states as a welcome opportunity for their own affirmation. They desired sovereignty but were prevented from accomplishing it by their multiple dispossession. National elites started to blame each other for this humiliating condition. The successor states were dispossessed of power, territories, and glory. The new nation-states were frustrated by their devastating condition. The dispersed Jews were left without the imperial protection. This embarrassing state gave rise to collective (historical) and individual (fictional) narratives of dispossession. This volume investigates their intended and unintended interaction.

Contributors are: Davor Beganović, Vladimir Biti, Zrinka Božić-Blanuša, Marko Juvan, Bernarda Katušić, Nataša Kovačević, Petr Kučera, Aleksandar Mijatović, Guido Snel, and Stijn Vervaet.

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Edited by Ian Beckett

The growing military, political and socio-economic costs for all belligerents as the Great War entered its fourth year were increasingly evident, liberal democracies and authoritarian states alike having to remobilise public opinion for yet greater sacrifices. While the Western Front was facing these challenges, 1917 was also marked by the collapse of Tsarist Russia and by food riots resuting both from the Entente's blockade of Central Europe and the revival of unrestricted submarine warfare by the Central Powers. Ottoman Turkey was feeling the strain of war as well, as British forces advanced in both Palestine and Mesopotamia. For states as yet uncommitted to war, such as the United States and China, 1917 was a year of decision. This volume amply illustrates the significance of this crucial year in the global conflict.
Contributors are Lawrence Sondhaus, Eric Grove, Keith Grieves, Matthew Hughes, Kaushik Roy, Vanda Wilcox, Laura Rowe, and Nick Hewitt.

Hungary's Long Nineteenth Century

Constitutional and Democratic Traditions in a European Perspective

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Laszlo Péter

Edited by Miklós Lojkó

László Péter, whose fourteen carefully selected essays are edited in this posthumous collection, was an indefatigable seeker of the most appropriate terminological modelling and narrative reconstruction of Hungary’s late nineteenth and early twentieth century progress from an essentially feudal entity into a modern European state. The articles examine thorny subjects, such as the growing tensions between the nationalities living within the multi-ethnic kingdom; language rights; autocracy, democracy and civil rights in Hungary perceived in a wider European context; the concept of the ‘Holy Crown’; the army question; church-state relations; the role of the intellectuals; and the changing British perception of Hungary. The central focus of the author’s microscope is reserved for a substantive re-evaluation of the Settlement between Hungary and the Austrian Empire in 1867, which had a decisive impact on the eventual fate of the old kingdom of Hungary and of the rest of Central Europe.

Umkämpftes Gedächtnis

Die Antinapoleonischen Kriege in der deutschen Erinnerung

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Karen Hagemann

Dieses Buch erkundet die umkämpften deutschen Erinnerungen an die sogenannten Befreiungskriege gegen Napoleon (1813–1815) im langen 19. Jahrhundert. Die Zeit der Antinapoleonischen Kriege zwischen 1806 und 1815 nahm lange eine Schlüsselposition in der Geschichtsschreibung und im nationalen Gedächtnis des deutschsprachigen Raums ein, da die kollektive Erinnerung an diese Kriege eine zentrale Bedeutung für die Ausformung von konkurrierenden Vorstellungen der deutschen Nation und Nationalidentität hatte. Diese Erinnerung wurde nicht nur von politischen Interessen, sondern auch von regionalen, sozialen und geschlechtsspezifischen Differenzen geformt. Das Buch untersucht das umkämpfte Gedächtnis nicht nur anhand der populären, militärischen und akademischen Geschichtsschreibung, sondern auch sehr viel breitenwirksamerer Erinnerungsmedien wie Memoiren und Romane sowie kultureller Praktiken, insbesondere Feiern und Symbolen.

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Martin Wein

In History of the Jews in the Bohemian Lands, Martin Wein traces the interaction of Czechs and Jews, but also of Christian German-speakers, Slovaks, and other groups in the Bohemian lands and in Czechoslovakia throughout the first half of the twentieth century. This period saw accelerated nation-building and nation-cleansing in the context of hegemony exercised by a changing cast of great powers, namely Austria-Hungary, France, Nazi Germany, and the Soviet Union. The author examines Christian-Jewish and inner-Jewish relations in various periods and provinces, including in Subcarpathian Ruthenia, emphasizing interreligious alliances of Jews with Protestants, such as T. G. Masaryk, and political parties, for example a number of Social Democratic ones. The writings of Prague’s Czech-German-Jewish founders of theories of nationalism, Hans Kohn, Karl W. Deutsch, and Ernest Gellner, help to interpret this history.

Earthly Delights

Economies and Cultures of Food in Ottoman and Danubian Europe, c. 1500-1900

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Edited by Angela Jianu and Violeta Barbu

Earthly Delights brings together a number of substantial and original scholarly studies by international scholars currently working on the history of food in the Ottoman Empire and East-Central Europe. It offers new empirical research, as well as surveys of the state of scholarship in this discipline, with special emphasis on influences, continuities and discontinuities in the culinary cultures of the Ottoman Porte, the Balkans and East-Central Europe between the 17th and 19th centuries. Some contributions address economic aspects of food provision, the development and trans-national circulation of individual dishes, and the role of merchants, diplomats and travellers in the transmission of culinary trends. Others examine the role of food in the construction of national and regional identities in contact zones where local traditions merged or clashed with imperial (Ottoman, Habsburg) and West-European influences.

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Börries Kuzmany

An urban biography, Brody: A Galician Border City in the Long Nineteenth Century reconciles 150 years of the town’s socioeconomic history with its cultural memory. The first comprehensive study of this city under Habsburg-Austrian rule, Börries Kuzmany advises against reading urban history solely through the national lens. Besides exploring Brody’s extraordinary ethno-confessional structure—Jews, Poles, and Ukrainians—Kuzmany examines the interrelation between the city’s geographical location at the imperial border, its standing as a key commercial hub in East-Central Europe, and its position as a major springboard for the dissemination of the Haskalah in Galicia and the Russian Empire. After delving into the contradictory perceptions of Brody in travelogues, fiction and memory books, Kuzmany uses contemporary and historical photographs to provide an illustrated walking tour of this now Ukrainian town.

Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 63 (2013)

Art and Migration. Netherlandish Artists on the Move, 1400-1750

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Edited by Frits Scholten, Joanna Woodall and Dulcia Meijers

Since the Middle Ages artists from the Low Countries were known to be fond of travelling, as Guicciardini in his Descrittione di tutti i Paesi Bassi (Antwerp, 1567) and Karel van Mander in his 1604 Schilderboeck, already noticed. Much more mobile than their colleagues from other European countries, many Netherlandish artists spread all over Europe; a remarkable number among them achieved great fame as court artists, as the careers of Claus Sluter in Burgundy, Anthonis Mor in Spain, Bartholomeus Spranger or Adriaen de Vries in Prague, Giambologna and Jacob Bijlevelt in Florence demonstrate. Moreover, they exerted considerable influence on the artistic production of their time. Nevertheless most of them sank into oblivion soon after they died. Dutch art history neglected them for a long time as they did not fit into the traditional canon of the Low Countries, nor were they adopted by the art histories of their new homelands. This new NKJ volume is an attempt to change this.

Table of Contents
1. Frits Scholten & Joanna Woodall, Introduction
2. Filip Vermeylen, Greener pastures? Capturing artists’ migrations during the Dutch Revolt
3. Hope Walker, Netherlandish immigrant painters and the Dutch reformed church of London, Austin Friars, 1560-1580
4. Arjan de Koomen, ‘Una cosa non meno maravigliosa che honorata’. The expansion of Netherlandish sculptors in sixteenth-century Europe
5. Franciszek Skibiński, Early-modern Netherlandish sculptors in Danzig and East-Central Europe. A study in dissemination through interrelation and workshop practice
6. Aleksandra Lipińska, Eastern outpost. The sculptors Herman Van Hutte and Hendrik Horst in Lviv c. 1560-1610
7. Gert Jan van der Sman and Bouk Wierda, Wisselend succes. De loopbanen van Nederlandse en Vlaamse kunstenaars in Florence, 1450-1600
8. Marije Osnabrugge , From itinerant to immigrant artist. Aert Mytens in Naples
9. Abigail D. Newman, Juan de la Corte in Madrid: ‘branding’ Flanders abroad
10. Judith Noorman, A fugitive’s success story. Jacob van Loo in Paris (1661-1670)
11. Isabella di Lenardo, Carlo Helman, merchant, patron and collector, and the role of family ties in the Antwerp–Venice migrant network
12. Saskia Cohen-Willner, Between painter and painter stands a tall mountain. Van Mander’s Italian Lives as a source for instructing artists in the ‘deelen der consten’