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Edited by Howard Louthan and Graeme Murdock

A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe analyses the diverse Christian cultures of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Czech lands, Austria, and lands of the Hungarian kingdom between the 15th and 18th centuries. It establishes the geography of Reformation movements across this region, and then considers different movements of reform and the role played by Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox clergy. This volume examines different contexts and social settings for reform movements, and investigates how cities, princely courts, universities, schools, books, and images helped spread ideas about reform. This volume brings together expertise on diverse lands and churches to provide the first integrated account of religious life in Central Europe during the early modern period.

Contributors are: Phillip Haberkern, Maciej Ptaszyński, Astrid von Schlachta, Márta Fata, Natalia Nowakowska, Luka Ilić, Michael Springer, Edit Szegedi, Mihály Balázs, Rona Johnston Gordon, Howard Louthan, Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin, Liudmyla Sharipova, Alexander Schunka, Rudolf Schlögl, Václav Bůžek, Mark Hengerer, Michael Tworek, Pál Ács, Maria Crăciun, Grażyna Jurkowlaniec, Laura Lisy-Wagner, and Graeme Murdock.

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Edited by William Kay and Anne Dyer

Starting from small numbers before 1914, the Pentecostal and charismatic movement now comprises nearly one third of the whole of the global Christian population. Scholarly accounts of Pentecostal and charismatic congregations in various countries have been written but this book does something new. It provides an interconnected account of Pentecostalism in Europe, something never before been attempted because of the diversity of languages spoken across the continent. This book shows how Pentecostalism spread from the north of Europe and how it fared during two horrific wars and under communist dictatorships. In doing so it provides new theological, historical and sociological information about Pentecostal churches in eastern and southern Europe, about the Catholic Charismatic Movement and about the state of western groupings.

Contextuality in Reformed Europe

The Mission of the Church in the Transformation of European Culture

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Edited by Christine Lienemann-Perrin, Hendrik M. Vroom and Michael Weinrich

The scope of this volume is how churches experience themselves and their mission in their context. The discussions in this volume provide ample material to substantiate the claim that the church should not be an ecclesia incurvata in se ipsa, (a church curved into itself) but welcoming and directed not only to personal needs but to social needs as well—but not bound to what people often feel the needs are and delving deeper to the real roots of sin and selfishness, be it personal, social or national. Contextualization in itself is part of the mission of the churches, but it is on the edge: should the church adapt to its context and lose both its identity and witness or should it find a way between the Scylla of easy adaptation to the changing contexts of this world that is passing and the Charybdis of a preservation of forms and identities of bygone times that have lost the freshness of the message of liberation of bondage, conversion and freedom, freedom to be what the church is called to be, a sign of hope, peace, reconciliation, justice and love?

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Ioana Feodorov, Yulia I. Petrova and Virgil Cândea

This is a thoroughly revised and expanded version of the first edition of the Arabic version of Dimitrie Cantemir’s The Divan or the Sage’s Dispute with the World (Ṣalāḥ al-ḥakīm wa-fasād al-ʿālam al-ḏamīm) (Iaşi, 1698), his first printed book, the earliest ethical treatise in Romanian literature and a testimony to his wide knowledge, reading, and proficiency in foreign languages. Completed in 1705 by Athanasius III Dabbās, Patriarch of the Antiochian Church (1684-1694, 1720-1724), the Arabic text is accompanied by the first translation into a modern language, English. Book III contains Cantemir’s version of the Latin work Stimuli virtutum, fraena peccatorum (Amsterdam, 1682) by the Unitarian Andzrej Wiszowaty (Andreas Wissovatius) of Raków (Poland), a chief representative of the Polish Brethren. Thus, in the space of twenty-three years Central-European Protestant ideas reached the Arab Christians of Ottoman Syria, by way of Greek and Arabic.

History of Global Christianity, Vol. I

European and Global Christianity, ca. 1500-1789

Edited by Jens Holger Schjørring and Norman A. Hjelm

Christianity was a global religion prior to the history recounted in European and Global Christianity, ca. 1500 - 1789. There were Christians in Asia and Africa before Europeans arrived in those places as well as in Latin America and North America, by movements of economic and political conquest and migration, and also Christian mission. This volume attests to the intensification of this globalization - in these 'new' continents as well as in Russia and the Ottoman territories. Simultaneously, in Europe Christianity was marked by Reformations, by confessional divisions, and by the Enlightenment. This global religion affected all structures of human life - society, politics, economics, philosophy, art, and the myriad ventures that form civilizations.

Contributors are: Carsten Bach-Nielsen, Alfons Brüning, Mariano Delgado, Andreas Holzem, Thomas Kaufman, Hartmut Lehmann, Bruce Masters, Ronnie Po-chia Hsia, Jan Stievermann and Kevin Ward.

This is part of a three volume work on the history of global Christianity. Volume II and III address the 19th and 20th centuries respectively and will appear in 2018.

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Matthias Riedl

Joachim of Fiore (c.1135-1202) remains one of the most fascinating and enigmatic figures of medieval Christianity. In his own time, he was an influential advisor to the mighty and powerful, widely respected for his prophetic exegesis and decoding of the apocalypse. In modern times, many thinkers, from Thomas Müntzer to Friedrich Engels, have hailed him as a prophet of progress and revolution. Even present-day theologians, philosophers and novelists were inspired by Joachim’s vision of a Third Age of the Holy Spirit.

However, at no time was Joachim an uncontroversial figure. Soon after his death, the church authorities became suspicious about the explosive potential of his theology, while more recently historians held him accountable for the fateful progressivism of Western Civilization.

Contributors are: Frances Andrews, Valeria De Fraja, Alfredo Gatto, Peter Gemeinhardt, Sven Grosse, Massimo Iiritano, Bernard McGinn, Matthias Riedl, and Brett Edward Whalen.

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Paul Knoll

The first fully developed history of the University of Cracow in this period in over a century, “A Pearl of Powerful Learning.” The University of Cracow in the Fifteenth Century places the school in the context of late medieval universities, traces the process of its foundation, analyzes its institutional growth, its setting in the Polish royal capital, its role in national life, and provides a social and geographical profile of students and faculty. The book includes extended treatment of the content of intellectual life and accomplishments of the school with reference to the works of its most important scholars in the medieval arts curriculum, medicine, law, and theology. The emergence of early Renaissance humanist interests at the university is also discussed.

Winner of the Early Slavic Studies Association 2016 Book Prize for most outstanding recent scholarly monograph on pre-modern Slavdom.
The work was described by the prize committee as: "A thoughtful, highly-informed, and nuanced history of the University of Cracow, an important institution in a pivotal period of Poland’s history. Knoll's treatment of such important issues as the role of the University in national life and the controversial and highly technical matter of the impact of Humanism are dealt with tactfully and thoughtfully. The book will become the definitive work on this topic, and will ensure that the material will rapidly be absorbed into general histories of education and of universities in the Renaissance."


Winner of The Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America's 2018 Oskar Halecki Award. This award recognizes a book of particular value and significance dealing with the Polish experience and is named after the distinguished 20th century Polish medieval historian, Oskar Halecki, who was one of the founders of PIASA. Professor Knoll will be recognized for this award during the 77th Annual Meeting of PIASA in Gdansk, Poland in June 2019.


Reading Proclus and the Book of Causes Volume 1

Western Scholarly Networks and Debates

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Edited by Dragos Calma

Reading Proclus and the Book of Causes, published in three volumes, is a fresh, comprehensive understanding of Proclus’ legacy in the Hellenic, Byzantine, Islamic, Latin and Hebrew traditions. The history of the Book of Causes, an Islamic adaptation of mainly Proclus’ Elements of Theology and Plotinus' Enneads, is reconsidered on the basis of newly discovered manuscripts. This first volume enriches our understanding of the diverse reception of Proclus’ Elements of Theology and of the Book of Causes in the Western tradition where universities and religious schools offered unparalleled conditions of diffusion. The volume sheds light on overlooked authors, texts, literary genres and libraries from all major European universities from the 12th to the 16th centuries.

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Edited by Dean Phillip Bell and Stephen G. Burnett

This book represents a multi-disciplinary approach to the problem of the Jews and the German Reformation. The contributions come from both senior and emerging scholars, from North America, Israel, and Europe, to ensure a breadth in perspective. The essays in this volume are arranged under four broad headings: 1. The Road to the Reformation (late medieval theology and the humanists and the Jews), 2. The Reformers and the Jews (essays on Luther, Melanchthon, Bucer, Zwingli, Calvin, Osiander, the Catholic Reformers, and the Radical Reformers), 3. Representations of Jews and Judaism (the portrayal of Judaism as a religion, images of the Jews in the visual arts, and in sixteenth-century German literature), and 4. Jewish Responses to the Reformation.

Contributors include: Dean Phillip Bell, Jay Berkovitz, Robert Bireley, Stephen G. Burnett, Elisheva Carlebach, Achim Detmers, Yaacov Deutsch, Maria Diemling, Michael Driedger, R. Gerald Hobbs, Joy Kammerling, Thomas Kaufmann, Hans-Martin Kirn, Christopher Ocker, Erika Rummel, Petra Schöner, Timothy J. Wengert, and Edith Wenzel.