Search Results

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Edited by Jason N. Blum

The traditions and institutions that we call religions abound with references to the supernatural: ancestral spirits, karma, the afterlife, miracles, revelation, deities, etc. How are students of religion to approach the behaviors, doctrines, and beliefs that refer to such phenomena, which by their very nature are supposed to defy the methods of empirical research and the theories of historical scholarship? That is the question of methodological naturalism. The Question of Methodological Naturalism offers ten thoughtful engagements with that perennial question for the academic study of religion. Contributors include established senior scholars and newer voices propounding a range of perspectives, resulting in both surprising points of convergence and irreconcilable differences in how our shared discipline should be conceptualized and practiced.

Facts, Values, and Methodology

A New Approach to Ethics

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Wim J. van der Steen

Science is not value-free and ethics is not fact-free. Science and ethics should be similar, but they are not. The author indicates how research in ethics is to change in the face of this. Ethicists should accommodate empirical work in their programs and they should take heed of methodologies developed in science and philosophy of science. They should abandon the search for a single overarching theory of morality. Controversies in ethics are often spurious for lack of articulate methodological key concepts. For example, disagreements over the value of general theories are misguided since disputants implicitly use different notions of generality and different notions of theory. An appropriate methodology does not suffice for the resolution of controversies but it is indispensable for consensus. The book argues these theses in a general way and applies them to the subject of egoism and altruism in ethics. Further case studies concern the environment and psychiatric disorders.

The Methodology of Maurice Hauriou

Legal, Sociological, Philosophical

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Christopher Berry Gray

This book shows that Hauriou’s positivist and pragmatic jurisprudence and social theory, as well as their application to the study of institutions, is satisfactorily supported by his idealistic philosophy. The nine chapters first locate Hauriou’s influences, then situate his disciplinary methodologies within methodology in general. The central chapters concern each of the three methodologies in turn.

Methods and Methodologies

Aristotelian Logic East and West, 500-1500

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Edited by Margaret Cameron and John Marenbon

Methods and Methodologies explores two questions about studying the Aristotelian tradition of logic. The first, addressed by the chapters on methods in the first half of the book, is directly about the medieval logical commentaries, treatises and handbooks. How did medieval authors in the different traditions, Latin and Arabic, go about their work on Aristotelian logic? In particular, how did they themselves conceive the relationship between logic and other branches of philosophy and disciplines outside philosophy? The second question is about methodologies, the subject of the chapters in the second half of the book: it invites writers to reflect on their own and their colleagues’ practice as twenty-first century interpreters of this medieval writing on Aristotelian logic.
Contributors are Sten Ebbesen, Christopher J. Martin, Christophe Erismann, Andrew Arlig, Simo Knuuttila, Amos Bertolacci, Jennifer Ashworth, Paul Thom, Gyula Klima, Matteo di Giovanni and Margaret Cameron.

One Text, Thousand Methods

Studies in Honor of Sjef van Tilborg

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Patrick Chatelion Counet and Ulrich Berges

Essays in this volume describe the shift in biblical exegesis within the last several decades from the interpretation of biblical texts as the outcome of historical development, or diachronic methodology, to the exploration of the text as the result of a reading process rather than a historical process, or synchronic methodology. Each essay examines a text from the Old or New Testament through the lens of one of the many modern synchronic methods used in postmodern literary interpretation. The methods discussed include ideology criticism, semantic and poetic analysis, cognitive linguistics, drama theory, narratology, deconstruction, and anthropology and intertextuality. The authors of this work challenge biblical scholars not to just perform exegesis, but to explore the methods and aims underlying their interpretations.

Following Marx

Method, Critique and Crisis

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Michael Lebowitz

What does it mean to follow Marx? In this examination of Marx’s methodology combined with specific applications on topics in political economy such as neo-Ricardian theory, analytical Marxism, the falling rate of profit, crisis theory, monopoly capital, Paul Sweezy, advertising and the capitalist state, this volume argues that the failure to understand (or explicit rejection of) Marx’s method has led astray many who consider themselves Marxists. By focusing particularly upon the concept of a totality and the necessary form of appearance of capital as many capitals in competition, Following Marx both demonstrates why Marx insisted that ‘in competition everything is reversed’ and provides a guide for following Marx.

Edited by Phillipp Mayring, Günter L. Huber, Leo Gürtler and Mechthild Kiegelmann

Mixed Methodology is a new star in the social science sky. More and more researchers are discontent with mono-method concepts for their research projects. They are trying new ways in combining or integrating different methods and methodological approaches. There are two debates in this field: the qualitative * quantitative controversy and the one-method * multi-method discourse. This book discusses those controversies and tries to give some reasons and examples for overcoming mono-method research in psychology. We think the discussion of methodological topics should not be divided from specific research projects. Only in the context of a concrete research question it makes sense to consider adequate research methods. So the volume presents examples of mixed methodologies from different fields in psychology and education, from psychiatry to organisational psychology, from learning studies to media analysis. The studies are grouped into four sections: combining qualitative methods, combining qualitative and quantitative methods, access to individual experience by mixed methods and deeper understanding of findings by mixing methods The book is adressed to all students, researchers and methodological interested people in social sciences and especially in psychology.

Pavel V. Maksakovsky: The Capitalist Cycle

An Essay on the Marxist Theory of the Cycle

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Richard Day and Pavel Maksakovsky

The Capitalist Cycle is a translation of a previously unknown work in Marxist economic theory. Originally published in 1928, this rediscovered work is one of the most creative essays witten by a Soviet economist during the first two decades after the Russian Revolution. Following the dialectic of Hegel and Marx, Maksakovsky aims to provide a 'concluding chapter' for Marx's Capital. The book examines economic methodology and logically reconstructs Marx's analysis into a comprehensive and dynamic theory of cyclical economic crises. The introductory essay by Richard B. Day situates Maksakovsky's work within the Hegelian and Marxist philosophical traditions by emphasizing the book's dialectical logic as well as its contribution to economic science.

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Edited by Cynthia A. Lassonde and Sally Galman

Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators is a comprehensive text that delineates a range of research methodologies. This edited volume, with many chapters written by self-study scholars who are noted in the field for particular methodological and epistemological perspectives, helps fill the gap in the literature on self-study research methods. It provides readers with an opportunity to examine various methodologies which will not only help them deepen their understanding of research but also, will allow them to select one that best suits their needs. Both new and experienced researchers will find this text valuable. We consider Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators a valuable contribution to the field of teacher education.

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Edited by Massimo Pendenza

Classical Sociology Beyond Methodological Nationalism defends classical sociology from the accusation of ‘methodological nationalism’. To reject such accusation, the volume presents three arguments. The first contends that classical sociology has not failed to deal with the global world (Part I). The second, that classical sociology has more frequently dealt with the transnational category of the ‘social’, rather than with the ‘national’ (Part II). The third, that where classical sociology has analysed national society, the latter has never been envisaged as a rigidly confined entity within its political boundaries (Part III). The outcome is a re-evaluation of classical sociological thought as a more functional tool for analysing the political forms of modernity in the era of globalisation.

Contributors include: Vittorio Cotesta, David Inglis, Austin Harrington, Massimo Pendenza, Michael Schillmeier, Emanuela Susca, Dario Verderame, and Federico Trocini.