Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • All: "methodology" x
  • Cultural Studies x
Clear All

Edited by William Fourie

From subversive shop windows to moralising theme parks, Urban Assemblage presents eight diverse perspectives on urban space and culture. The volume spotlights cities as far afield as Johannesburg and Cork City to see how different cultures, media, mobilities and narratives come to form the spaces we occupy; it looks at the Tuscan utopia, the evolution of the hipster, the Neo-bohemian café culture of gentrification, and breaking the rigid urban way of life through the fluid (identity) movement of Parkour. Not only is the subject matter diverse, but the interdisciplinary spirit at the core of this volume elicits convergences and divergences, intersections and parallels by drawing on wide-ranging methodologies and disciplines. Urban Assemblage is an assemblage of eight different voices, informed and cutting-edge in their explications of various urban spaces.

Amber Anna Colvin

In recent years the study of celebrity, of what constitutes fame, and how that fame is controlled and performed, has become an area of intense scholarly interest. This is due in part to the increased emphasis on social and cultural history and the presence of new and innovative sources, both of which have created new and exciting areas of study. The growing importance and recognition of the celebrity phenomenon has created a field that is both currently rich in literature and has the room for continued scholarship. The works in this volume address debates on the concept of celebrity, including the modernity of celebrity, the importance of the celebrity-audience relationship and the question of who controls celebrity personas. How, in essence, do celebrities “do fame?” This question is at the centre of this book, with the pieces included addressing this idea across a variety of academic disciplines, time periods, and methodological approaches.

Edited by Nuria Rodríguez Ortega, Fátima Díez-Platas and Seppo Kuivakari

The articles comprised in this anthology are attempting to discuss the rapid change of digital media technologies and the way they impetus our understanding of history and memory. History should not be regarded only as an object of research. It is also a subject, performing and registering agency. The aim of the articles will not be to cover the whole range of mediated histories, but to claim fresh insights for debate and discovery in terms of digital memories. In this sense, contributions for this volume will leave the “doors of perception” (Aldous Huxley) wide open and sketch the impact of media to different cultural practices, identity work and preservation of history, as well as the examination of it. Likewise, divergence of the papers at hand indicates that the concept “digital” ought to be recognized as institutional practices, methodological tools, or as content providers for memories.

Edited by Nate Hinerman and Holly Lynn Baumgartner

From the ridicule of Emo culture on YouTube to the minute joys of the Happy Hour Trolley in an Australian palliative care setting, responses to suffering and death range from avoidance to eradication. Blunt Traumas thoughtfully engages these topics with compassion and brutal honesty. Contributors across the spectrum of professions using a variety of methodologies, including case studies, fieldwork, systematic philosophy, and historical and textual analysis all respond to the orienting question: ‘How does culture impact, co-create, and/or produce suffering?’ Their inter- and multi-disciplinary perspectives are divided into two sections. The first, ‘Public Perceptions of Death, Dying, and Suffering’ closely examines human interactions with and performance of technologies of suffering from wireless to religious, dead baby bloggers to wounded warriors. The second half of the book focuses on the ‘The Sufferer’s Right to Choose’, whether that concerns end-of-life decisions, medical technologies, or narratives of self. Together, these chapters provide greater intelligibility on and provocative discussions about the oft ignored or ‘buried’ discourses of suffering and dying.

Themes in Theatre

Collective Approaches to Theatre and Performance

The series Themes in Theatre is published in association with the International Federation for Theatre Research/Fédération Internationale pour la Recherche Théâtrale (FIRT/IFTR) and provides a publishing environment for collective work by its members. Monographs are not considered for this series; it aims at volumes that are characterised by a high level of interconnectedness – each author clearly contributing to a central subject within the field of theatre and performance. The fact that the multiple authors will have discussed the subject and their contributions among each other not only ensures a high level of consistency within each volume but also results in a gamut of approaches and perspectives that nevertheless are centrally focused.
As such the series reflects contemporary issues and current scholarship within international theatre studies. Its main contributors are the working groups of the FIRT/IFTR consisting of specialists working on diverse subjects at the forefront of theatre research. Therefore Themes in Theatre is not limited to any specific ‘-ism’, theatre genre, approach or methodology. As long as academic standards are met and the collectivity of the work is ensured we welcome historical, critical, theoretical, analytical or other subjects that are related to the theatrical arts. However, the set-up of the series is such that it explicitly furthers interdisciplinary work and reflection on concepts and methods.
For information on the FIRT/IFTR, its working groups and yearly conferences, please see the website:
www.firt-iftr.org.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.

Series:

David J. Galbreath, Ainius Lašas and Jeremy W. Lamoreaux

Continuity and Change in the Baltic Sea Region uncovers the Baltic States’ foreign policy transition from Socialist Republics to EU member-states. Situated between the Russian Federation and Northern Europe, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have had to manoeuvre within an often delicate sub-region. Since independence, the foreign policies of the Baltic States have been dominated by de-Sovietization and European integration. Lying at the crossroads between small state theory and identity politics, this analysis engages with the development of Baltic foreign policies as post-Soviet, small and transitioning states.
The authors argue that Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania dictated their early foreign policy agendas based on a process of identity construction and as a response to their regional environment. This process took the Baltic States from East to West in their foreign policy aspirations. Key factors in foreign policy making and implementation are discussed, as well as external factors that shaped Baltic foreign policy agendas. Overall, the book illustrates how continuity and change in the Baltic foreign policies has been shaped by both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ factors. It is a study in the foreign policies of transitioning states and in this regard illuminates a much larger research area beyond its geographic focus.

Things Done Change

The Cultural Politics of Recent Black Artists in Britain

Series:

Eddie Chambers

1980s Britain witnessed the brassy, multifaceted emergence of a new generation of young, Black-British artists. Practitioners such as Sonia Boyce and Keith Piper were exhibited in galleries up and down the country and reviewed approvingly. But as the 1980s generation gradually but noticeably fell out of favour, the 1990s produced an intriguing new type of Black-British artist. Ambitious, media-savvy, successful artists such as Steve McQueen, Chris Ofili, and Yinka Shonibare made extensive use of the Black image (or, at least, images of Black peo¬ple, and visuals evocative of Africa), but did so in ways that set them apart from earlier Black artists. Not only did these artists occupy the curatorial and gallery spaces nominally reserved for a slightly older generation but, with aplomb, audacity, and purpose, they also claimed previously unimaginable new spaces. Their successes dwarfed those of any previous Black artists in Britain. Back-to-back Turner Prize victories, critically acclaimed Fourth Plinth commissions, and no end of adulatory media attention set them apart.
What happened to Black-British artists during the 1990s is the chronicle around which Things Done Change is built. The extraordinary changes that the profile of Black-British artists went through are dis¬cussed in a lively, authoritative, and detailed narrative. In the evolving history of Black-British artists, many factors have played their part. The art world’s turning away from work judged to be overly ‘political’ and ‘issue-based’; the ascendancy of Blair’s New Labour government, determined to locate a bright and friendly type of ‘diversity’ at the heart of its identity; the emergence of the precocious and hegemonic yBa grouping; governmental shenanigans; the tragic murder of Black Londoner Stephen Lawrence – all these factors and many others underpin the telling of this fascinating story.
Things Done Change represents a timely and important contribution to the building of more credible, inclusive, and nuanced art histories. The book avoids treating and discussing Black artists as practitioners wholly separate and distinct from their counterparts. Nor does the book seek to present a rosy and varnished account of Black-British artists. With its multiple references to Black music, in its title, several of its chapter headings, and citations evoked by artists themselves, Things Done Change makes a singular and compelling narrative that reflects, as well as draws on, wider cultural mani¬festations and events in the socio-political arena.

Beneath the Crust of Culture

Psychoanalytic Anthropology and the Cultural Unconscious in American Life

Series:

Howard F. Stein

In this book, the author presents a pioneering interpretation of culture as constituting a dynamic relationship between the visible “crust” and the elusive “core” of social life. He meticulously maps the role of the unconscious in shaping much of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. He crosses and transcends disciplinary boundaries in studies of September 11, 2001, the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, the execution of Timothy McVeigh, the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, the 1999 Worcester, Massachusetts fire, and the eruption of hypernationalism and xenophobia in nations and workplaces — all as cultural phenomena with a psychodynamic core. He shows how the experience of loss in the face of massive social change often leads to equally massive defence against the experience of mourning. Beneath the Crust of Culture will be of interest not only for behavioural and social science professionals, but also for a lay public interested in understandings of culture deeper than the surface of the news and of official pronouncements.

Edited by Myriam Díaz Diocaretz

Critical Studies seeks to foster cross-disciplinarity and thus to participate in the ongoing reconfiguration of the Humanities and Social Sciences, while challenging received conceptual frames and perspectives, be they entrenched or 'current'.
To this aim, it publishes guest-edited, multi-authored collections of essays by scholars and intellectuals coming from various disciplinary and cultural backgrounds.
The series welcomes volumes dealing with a vast range of topics, from the most enduring to the most contemporary, such as future and emerging technologies.
Whether topics initially pertain to the fields of gender studies, media studies, postcolonial studies or studies in post-humanism, to name just a few, special consideration is given to collections that:
1. seriously attempt to produce innovative cross-disciplinary analyses by involving multiple theoretical languages and/or cultural areas;
2. do not content themselves with applying methodologies or theories but submit their own gestures and presuppositions to critical scrutiny;
3. endeavor to open new questions and to posit new objects for investigation on the basis of their methodological and theoretical innovation.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.

Edited by Theo D'haen and Hans Bertens

Postmodern Studies deals with (any aspect of) postmodernism, or of postmodernity and the postmodern in relation to literature.

Publications in this series can be either of a theoretical or a more practical/analytic nature. They may refer to any one, or to several, literary works, genres, or literatures. They may also refer to the other arts, provided the main focus remain literary. In evaluating contributions, the editors of Postmodern Studies will follow no particular methodological or ideological bias.

All manuscripts accepted in the series first undergo a process of peer review.

Due to rapid developments in literary studies we close the series for new publications.