Search Results

Series:

Victor Figueroa Sepulveda

This book confronts critical problems being experienced by Latin America in its quest for development. Special attention is paid to the living conditions of the popular sectors over the last half-century under “industrial colonialism.” The author’s framework of analysis weaves together key structural variables including the neoliberal mode of knowledge creation for material production in order to unveil the actual mechanisms of the reproduction of this system. The decisive role of science in the development of the productive forces forms the basis of explicating the “state development function.” The external and internal manifestations of the main underlying contradictions in Latin America are systematically exposed as they unfold from the region’s particular integration into the imperialist system.

Series:

Tine Destrooper

In Come Hell or High Water: Feminism and the Legacy of Armed Conflict in Central America, Tine Destrooper analyzes the political projects of feminist activists in light of their experience as former revolutionaries. She compares the Guatemalan and Nicaraguan experience to underline the importance of ethnicity for women’s activism during and after the civil conflict.
The first part of the book traces the influence of armed conflict on contemporary women’s activism, by combining an analysis of women’s personal histories with an analysis of structural and contextual factors. This critical analysis forms the basis of the second part of the book, which discusses several alternative forms of women’s activism rooted in indigenous practices
The book thereby combines a micro- and macro-level analysis to present a sound understanding of post-conflict women’s activism.

The Two Faces of Inca History

Dualism in the Narratives and Cosmology of Ancient Cuzco

Series:

Isabel Yaya

The historical narratives of the Inca dynasty, known to us through Spanish records, present several discrepancies that scholarship has long attributed to the biases and agendas of colonial actors. Drawing on a redefinition of royal descent and a comparative literary analysis of primary sources, this book restores the pre-Hispanic voices embedded in the chronicles. It identifies two distinctive bodies of Inca oral traditions, each of which encloses a mutually conflicting representation of the past that, considered together, reproduces patterns of Cuzco’s moiety division. Building on this new insight, the author revisits dual representations in the cosmology and ritual calendar of the ruling elite. The result is a fresh contribution to ethnohistorical works that have explored native ways of constructing history.

Series:

Edited by Gale Goodwin Gómez and Hein van der Voort

The morphological process of reduplication occurs in languages throughout the world. Reduplication in indigenous languages of South America is the first volume to focus on reduplication in South America. The indigenous languages of South America remain under-documented and little accessible to theoretical linguistics. Most regions and language families of the continent are represented in articles based on recent fieldwork by the authors. Included are data concerning a diverse set of reduplication phenomena from the Andes, Amazonia, and other regions of the continent. A wide range of language families and isolates are discussed, such as Tupian, Quechuan, Mapuche, Tacanan, Arawakan, Barbacoan, and Macro-Jê. Several languages present unusual properties, some of which violate presumed universals, such as no partial without full reduplication.

Development and Equity

An Interdisciplinary Exploration by Ten Scholars from Africa, Asia and Latin America

Edited by Dick Foeken, Ton Dietz, Leo de Haan and Linda Johnson

A quarter of a century ago His Royal Highness Prince Claus of the Netherlands (1926-2002) formulated his statements on ‘development and equity’. To honour him and his work, a professorial chair in ‘development and equity’ was established in 2003: the ‘Prince Claus Chair’. On the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Chair, a conference was held in The Hague in November 2012. Each of the ten chair holders presented a paper written from his/her own perspective. These papers have been brought together in this book and show the diversity and richness of the theme. The volume also includes three essays by the promising young scholars who were judged to be the top three in a competition for the best Master’s thesis in ‘development, equity and citizenship’.

Series:

Dan La Botz

This volume is a valuable re-assessment of the Nicaraguan Revolution by a Marxist historian of Latin American political history. It shows that the FSLN (‘the Sandinistas’), with politics principally shaped by Soviet and Cuban Communism, never had a commitment to genuine democracy either within the revolutionary movement or within society at large; that the FSLN’s lack of commitment to democracy was a key factor in the way that revolution was betrayed from the 1970s to the 1990s; and that the FSLN’s lack of rank-and-file democracy left all decision-making to the National Directorate and ultimately placed that power in the hands of Daniel Ortega. Pursuing his narrative into the present, La Botz shows that, once their would-be bureaucratic ruling class project was defeated, Ortega and the FSLN leadership turned to an alliance with the capitalist class.

Series:

Eugene Gogol

Utopia and the Dialectic in Latin American Liberation begins by examining the concept of utopia in Latin American thought, particularly its roots within indigenous emancipatory practice, and suggests that within this concept of utopia can be found a resonance with the dialectic of negativity that Hegel developed under the impact of the French Revolution, further developed by such thinker-activists as Marx, Lenin and Raya Dunayevskaya. From this theoretical-philosophical plane, the study moves to the liberation practices of social movements in recent Latin American history. Movements such as the Zapatistas in Mexico, Indigenous feminism throughout the Americas, and Indigenous struggles in Bolivia and Colombia, are among those taken up--most often in the words of the participants. The study concludes by discussing a dialectic of philosophy and organization in the context of Latin American liberation.

Plebeian Power

Collective Action and Indigenous, Working-Class and Popular Identities in Bolivia

Series:

Álvaro García Linera

In addition to his role as Evo Morales’s vice-president, Álvaro García Linera is one of Bolivia’s foremost intellectuals. With a theoretical trajectory beginning in efforts to combine Marxism and Indianism, then developed in reaction to the neoliberal turn of the 1980s and in contact with the mass social movements of recent years, García Linera's Plebeian Power can be read as both an evolving analysis of Bolivian reality through periods of great social change, and as an intellectual biography of the author himself. Informed by such thinkers as Marx, Bourdieu and René Zavaleta, García Linera reflects on the nature of the state, class and indigenous identity and their relevance to social struggles in Bolivia.

English translation of La potencia plebeya: Acción colectiva e identidades indígenas, obreras y populares en Bolivia published by Siglo del Hombre Editores and CLASCO in 2007.

Roots of Empire

Forests and State Power in Early Modern Spain, c.1500-1750

Series:

John T. Wing

Roots of Empire is the first monograph to connect forest management and state-building in the early modern Spanish global monarchy. The Spanish crown's control over valuable sources of shipbuilding timber in Spain, Latin America, and the Philippines was critical for developing and sustaining its maritime empire. This book examines Spain's forest management policies from the sixteenth century through the middle of the eighteenth century, connecting the global imperial level with local lived experiences in forest communities impacted by this manifestation of expanded state power. As home to the early modern world's most extensive forestry bureaucracy, Spain met serious political, technological, and financial limitations while still managing to address most of its timber needs without upending the social balance.

Reading the Bible across Contexts

Luke’s Gospel, Socio-Economic Marginality, and Latin American Biblical Hermeneutics

Series:

Esa J. Autero

In Reading the Bible Across Contexts Esa Autero offers a fresh perspective on Luke’s poverty texts. In addition to an historical reading, he conducted an empirical investigation of two Latin American Bible reading groups – one poor and the other affluent – to shed light on Luke’s poverty texts. The interaction between historical reading and present-day readings demonstrates the impact of socio-economic status on biblical hermeneutics and sheds new light on Luke’s views on wealth and poverty. At the same time Esa Autero critically examines liberation theologian’s claim that poor are privileged biblical interpreters.