Search Results

Letters in the British Museum

Transliterated and Translated

Series:

van Soldt

This book is the twelfth volume in the series Altbabylonische Briefe in Umschrift und Übersetzung, which wants to make the many - often dispersed - letters from the Old Babylonian period available in transliteration and translation. Volume 12 is the first in a short series of hitherto unpublished material in the British Museum. Two more volumes are planned.
Most of the new letters presented here
belong to one collection and can be split up into several archives. Two of these are of particular interest: the texts dealing with the exploits of the judge Ipqu-Nabium (2 ff.) and the archives around the trader Sin-erībam (51 ff.). The latter contains the correspondence between the Sippar-based Sin-erībam and his agent Awīl-ilim. The texts deal with the textile trade between Babylonia and northern Mesopotamia and provide us with a 'missing link' between the trade in the north (known from old Assyrian texts) and the textile industry in Babylonia.

Series:

Edited by William V. Harris and Giovanni Ruffini

As one of the greatest cities of antiquity, Alexandria has always been a severe challenge to its historians, all the more so because the surviving evidence, material and textual, is so disparate. New archaeological and literary discoveries and the startling diversity of ancient Alexandria (so reminiscent of some modern cities) add to the interest. The present volume contains the papers given at a conference at Columbia University in 2002 which attempted to lay some of the foundations for a new history of Alexandria by considering, in particular, its position between the traditions and life of Egypt on the one hand, and on the other the immigrants who came there from Greece and elsewhere in the wake of the founder Alexander of Macedon.

Series:

Vogelsang

The present book discusses the eastern part of the Persian Achaemenid Empire, which was founded around the middle of the sixth century B.C. by Cyrus the Great. Within twenty years the empire stretched from the Aegean coast in the west, to the Kâbul valley in the east. How did the Persians manage to conquer such a vast area within such a short time? And how did they manage to preserve their empire for two hundred years before being defeated by the military genius of Alexander of Macedon?
The answer to the above questions is sought in the chaotic years that preceded the rise of the Achaemenids. On the basis of geographical and general historical information, the Persian Achaemenid texts and reliefs, classical sources and archaeological material, this study draws attention to the nomads from the Central Asian steppes and deserts who throughout history have played a major role in the developments that took place on the Iranian Plateau and beyond.

Letters in the British Museum

Transliterated and Translated, Part 2

Series:

van Soldt

This book is the thirteenth volume in the series Altbabylonische Briefe in Umschrift und Übersetzung, which wants to make the many — often dispersed — letters from the Old Babylonian period available in transliteration and translation. Volume 13 is the second in a short series of hitherto unpublished material in the British Museum. One more volume is planned. The letters presented in this volume come from various collections and form different groups. The most important of these groups contains 45 letters dealing with the administration in Larsa at the time of king Hammurabi. A large portion of these letters was sent by Hammurabi himself. Of the other groups of letters two are of special interest. The first one consists of just four letters which give a vivid picture of the problems around the building of a house at Sippar. The second contains letters sent either to or from the city of Kish. The senders are partly known from other texts, specifically the ones published in volume 10.
Orientalists and specialists in Assyriology as well as historians will benefit from this publication.

The Fall of Samaria

An Historical and Archaeological Study

Series:

Bob Prof. Dr. Becking

The fall of Samaria is narrated in 2 Kings 17. The cuneiform inscriptions dealing with this event are prima facie contradictory: the conquest is ascribed to both Shalmaneser V and Sargon II. The surmise of H. Tadmor that Samaria was conquered twice is investigated. At the same time the events are interpreted in their socio-historical framework.
Tadmor's assumption cannot be falsified, although his theory should be modified as regards the date of the first conquest: 723 B.C.E. The fall of Samaria can be interpreted as an inevitable result of the expansion of the Assyrian Empire in combination with internal struggles in Israel. Evidence of deportation reveals that deportees were treated as normal citizens.
Thorough discussion of the sources and their interpretation is a feature of this book.

Series:

Edited by J. van Dijk

In the autumn of 1997, following his sixty-fifth birthday Prof. Dr Herman te Velde retired from the chair of Egyptology at the University of Groningen. On this occasion he was presented with a volume of Egyptological studies in his honour to which colleagues and friends from all over the world contributed. Although the emphasis is on the relition of Ancient Egypt, the book covers a wide range of subjects including history and archaeology, philology and linguistics.

Series:

Wilfred Watson and Nicolas Wyatt

Over the past seven decades, the scores of publications on Ugarit in Northern Syria (15th to 11th centuries BCE) are so scattered that a good overall view of the subject is virtually impossible. Wilfred Watson and Nicolas Wyatt, the editors of the present Handbook in the series Handbook of Oriental Studies, have brought together and made accessible this accumulated knowledge on the archives from Ugarit, called 'the foremost literary discovery of the twentieth century' by Cyrus Gordon.
In 16 chapters a careful selection of specialists in the field deal with all important aspects of Ugarit, such as the discovery and decipherment of a previously unknown script (alphabetic cuneiform) used to write both the local language (Ugaritic) and Hurrian and its grammar, vocabulary and style; documents in other languages (including Akkadian and Hittite), as well as the literature and letters, culture, economy, social life, religion, history and iconography of the ancient kingdom of Ugarit. A chapter on computer analysis of these documents concludes the work. This first such wide-ranging survey, which includes recent scholarship, an extensive up-to-date bibliography, illustrations and maps, will be of particular use to those studying the history, religion, cultures and languages of the ancient Near East, and also of the Bible and to all those interested in the background to Greek and Phoenician cultures.

The Making of Israel

Cultural Diversity in the Southern Levant and the Formation of Ethnic Identity in Deuteronomy

C.L. Crouch

In The Making of Israel C.L. Crouch presents the southern Levant during the seventh century BCE as a major period for the formation of Israelite ethnic identity, challenging scholarship which dates biblical texts with identity concerns to the exilic and post-exilic periods as well as scholarship which limits pre-exilic identity concerns to Josianic nationalism. The argument analyses the archaeological material from the southern Levant during Iron Age II, then draws on anthropological research to argue for an ethnic response to the economic, political and cultural change of this period. The volume concludes with an investigation into identity issues in Deuteronomy, highlighting centralisation and exclusive Yahwism as part of the deuteronomic formulation of Israelite ethnic identity.

The Making of Israel

Cultural Diversity in the Southern Levant and the Formation of Ethnic Identity in Deuteronomy

Series:

C.L. Crouch

In The Making of Israel C.L. Crouch presents the southern Levant during the seventh century BCE as a major period for the formation of Israelite ethnic identity, challenging scholarship which dates biblical texts with identity concerns to the exilic and post-exilic periods as well as scholarship which limits pre-exilic identity concerns to Josianic nationalism. The argument analyses the archaeological material from the southern Levant during Iron Age II, then draws on anthropological research to argue for an ethnic response to the economic, political and cultural change of this period. The volume concludes with an investigation into identity issues in Deuteronomy, highlighting centralisation and exclusive Yahwism as part of the deuteronomic formulation of Israelite ethnic identity.