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Edited by Henk Blezer

The proceedings of the seminars of the International Association for Tibetan Studies (IATS) have developed into the most representative world-wide cross-section of Tibetan Studies. They are an indispensable reference-work for anyone interested in Tibet and capture the cutting edge of Tibet-related research.
This volume is the first of three volumes of general proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the IATS. It presents a careful selection of scholarly and academic articles on Tibetan history, which includes contemporary developments as well as a compact, but significant, linguistic section.
The complete series covers ten volumes. The other seven volumes are the outcome of expert panels. Of special interest to readers of this book may be the edited volumes by Christopher Beckwith (linguistics), Helmut Eimer and David Germano (Buddhist canon), Lawrence Epstein (Khams pa history), Deborah Klimburg-Salter (art history) and the third volume of the general proceedings (Bhutan and art history).

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Nicola Di Cosmo and Dalizhabu Bao

In the seventeenth century the Manchu conquered the whole of China, replacing the Ming dynasty.
The original Manchu and Mongol documents selected for the this publication, translated and amply annotated, provide fascinating new information about the relations between Manchus and Mongols before the Manchu conquest of China.
They include diplomatic correspondence, military liaisons, legal cases, and records of tribute missions and present a detailed picture of the relative position of the various Mongol tribes vis-à-vis the future emperors of China.

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Edited by Bryan Cuevas and Kurtis Schaeffer

This volume focuses upon the relationships between the past and the present evoked in Tibetan historiography, ritual literature, and Buddhist esoteric writings. It offers diverse perspectives on a critical period in Tibet’s history when Tibetans found themselves caught up in the tides of political turmoil and forced into the center of a much larger Central Eurasian struggle for power and territorial control between the Manchu rulers of the Qing empire and the Mongols of the north. The volume highlights the various ways Tibetan historians, biographers, and Buddhist scholars during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries succeeded in the task of reinventing and reinforcing their respective traditions.

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Edited by P. Christiaan Klieger

The ten papers presented in this eight volume of the Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the IATS, 2000, provide examples of the colourful and lively range of Tibetan self-expressions that exist within the modern homeland and in exile. The scholars here represent the fields of anthropology, sociology, literary studies, history, and political science. Four papers are based in studies in the modern Tibet Autonomous Region, five are grounded in the Tibetan diaspora, and one deals with both classical Tibetan history and current affairs. The mass representation of Tibetan self, delivered through various literary vehicles, by linguistic competence, body decoration, landscape, or individual deportment, constitutes the basic theme of this collection. The volume is useful for any student of Tibet and those interested in the process of identity formation and presentation.

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Edited by Katia Buffetrille and Hildegard Diemberger

Which places does Tibet include? Are people Tibetan merely because of living in those places? Territory and Identity are notions that are widely present in academic and popular discourses on Tibet. In 1992 a group of French and Austrian researchers who had studied some of the mountain deities and sacred landscapes of Tibet began meeting to discuss the links between territory and identity in Tibetan culture. Eight years later an interdisciplinary group of scholars met in Leiden in Holland to consider these questions in more detail.
This book contains some of their findings, based on case studies carried out across the Tibetan and Himalayan regions. The authors look at the role of local deities, kinship, economy, politics and administration using approaches from across the social sciences to try to work out how a community constructs and reconstructs its idea of itself, and how its members think about and are affected by the land on which they were reared.

Unearthing Bon Treasures

Life and Contested Legacy of a Tibetan Scripture Revealer, with a General Bibliography of Bon

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Dan Martin

The subject for this study, the Tibetan “treasure revealer” Gshen-chen Klu-dga’, is a crucial figure in the development of Bon as an organised religion after the eleventh century. Here for the first time he is situated in the context of what was happening in Buddhism at the time.
By scrutinizing his life and gter-ma (“treasures”), that were to be of much controversy in later ages, Dan Martin sheds light on the mechanism of Tibetan polemical tradition and the ways in which sectarianism accords itself legitimacy by resurrecting ancient arguments in a subtly distorted manner.
The exhaustive annotated bibliography of previous works about Bon, forming the second part of the work, can rightly be seen as a legacy of Gshen-chen. Both parts taken together make this an indispensable guide to any student of Bon.

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Edited by John Ardussi and Henk Blezer

The proceedings of the seminars of the International Association for Tibetan Studies (IATS) have developed into the most representative world-wide cross-section of Tibetan Studies. They are an indispensable reference-work for anyone interested in Tibet and capture the cutting edge of Tibet-related research.
This volume is the last of three volumes of general proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the IATS. It is a richly illustrated book, containing a careful selection of scholarly and academic articles that open surprising perspectives on Bhutan and discuss Tibetan artwork.
The complete series covers ten volumes. The other seven volumes are the outcome of expert panels. Of special interest to readers of this book is the edited volume by Deborah Klimburg-Salter and Eva Allinger (art history).

Sources on the Alans

A Critical Compilation

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Agustí Alemany

The first exhaustive key to the sources to, and the proper names of the Alans. The scattered nature of sources and their dispersion in time, space and intermediary languages may explain the lack of a true comprehensive guide to this important ancient people, a nomadic tribe of Iranian stock, living from one end of the Eurasian steppes to the other. Documents from ancient up to medieval times regularly make, in a wide variety of languages, mention of the Alans.
With his Sources on the Alans Agustí Alemany now provides us for the first time with a reliable and exhaustive handbook by collecting, classifying, translating (or summarizing) all reports on the Alans written in Greek, Latin, Medieval Latin, Byzantine, Arabic, Armenian, Catalan, Georgian, Hebrew, Iranian, Mongol, Russian, Syriac and Chinese languages.
The volume will also be frequently used as an Onomasticon. With time tables and indices on authors and passages. A reference work in the truest sense.

The Secret History of the Mongols (2 vols)

A Mongolian Epic Chronicle of the Thirteenth Century

Igor de Rachewiltz

Brill is proud to announce the paperback edition of the much-acclaimed standard work Secret History of the Mongols by Igor de Rachewiltz.

The 13th century Secret History of the Mongols, covering the great Činggis Qan’s (1162-1227) ancestry and life, stands out as a literary monument of first magnitude. Written partly in prose and partly in epic poetry, it is the major native source on Činggis Qan, also dealing with part of the reign of his son and successor Ögödei (r. 1229-41).
This true handbook contains an historical introduction, a full translation of the chronicle in accessible English, plus an extensive commentary. Indispensable for the historian, the Sino-Mongolist, the Altaic philologist, and anyone interested in comparative literature and Central Asian folklore.

The Secret History of the Mongols has been selected by Choice as Outstanding Academic Title (2005).

Lhasa in the Seventeenth Century

The Capital of the Dalai Lamas

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Edited by Françoise Pommaret

This is the story of the rise of Lhasa, before 1642 a small town, renowned for its Jokhang temple and its three large 15th century Gelukpa monasteries. The political victory of the Gelukpa changed its destiny and it was the Fifth Dalai Lama who made Lhasa into the centre of the Tibetan world, with an influence reaching into Mongolia and Ladakh. It became a true capital, with prestigious monuments, and the Potala Palace as its focus and symbol.
Based on Tibetan and Western sources, the book provides a fascinating study of the history of Lhasa against the background of the triangular relations Tibetans-Mongols-Manchus. With ample attention for 17th century Lhasa’s historical, political and cultural context, it offers new insights on Lhasa, also, in the last chapter, in its contemporary Chinese framework.