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Brakel-Papenhuijzen

The ritual bedhaya dances of the Central Javanese courts form a highly valued expression of Javanese culture. These stately dance forms, comprising complex choreographies executed to the accompaniment of archaic songs and gamelan music, are part of the cultural tradition of the Mataram dynasty. They have been preserved in the two main court centres of Central Java: Surakarta and Yogyakarta.
The contents of the book range from a relatively general introduction to a detailed analysis of structural, formal features of the dances. Included are theories on the origin, social context and esoteric meaning, as well as 19th and 20th century scores of performances.
The two main components of the art form, choral singing and group dancing, have each been discussed in a separate chapter. A number of song texts and choreographies, transcribed from palace manuscripts, are published for the first time. These songs represent an archaic singing style, which holds important information on the development of Javanese vocal and instrumental music.
An analysis of bedhaya choreographies which are seldom performed nowadays may serve to prevent the impending disappearance of this beautiful and stylized art form. The choreographic discussion has been visualized on a 60 minute video-tape, produced from research material which was filmed between 1983-1985. This video-tape may be ordered from the author.

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Robert L. Brown

This volume deals with a unique group of stone sculptures, representations of the Buddha's Wheel of the Law, found in present-day Thailand that date from about the seventh-eighth centuries CE.
The book places these sculptures in their historical, religious, and art historical contexts to determine what they meant to the culture (called Dvāravatī) that produced them. Thus, other art historical material associated with the Wheels, including stone deer, Buddha images, and stupas, are discussed.
Of greatest importance is how these sculptures relate to both the art in Cambodia and that in India, and to determine what these relationships can tell us about the process (called Indianization) by which Indian culture, religion, and art were adapted in Southeast Asia.

The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma

Types, Iconography, Manufacture and Use

Series:

Richard Cooler

The Karen Bronze Drums of Burma defines the development of the Karen Bronze Drums (Heger Type III) during the past eight hundred years, as the continuation by a hill tribe group, of the earlier "Dong Son" tradition. Its chronological development is traced through seven stages by applying a method of intensive motivic analysis to data collected from 370 drums. Four new subtypes are defined and their interrelationships are demonstrated by use of tables, figures, and plates. The meaning of these motivic changes together with early accounts of Karen culture are used to establish that the drums were symbolically a magic pond that the Karen ritually manipulated to assure prosperity.

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J. M. Pluvier

This book deals with the historical development of South-East Asia (Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines) from the earliest times to the present. In the first section a chronological survey in succinct form of the history of the area is presented so as to provide the reader with the background information necessary to make adequate use of the second section. That part of the book can be used on its own, portraying the history of South-East Asia in 64 pages of maps which cover such items as the formation of states and empires, the migration of peoples, trade routes, cultural and economic aspects, the rise and decline of colonialism and the political development of the post-colonial era. All maps are coloured. The text part places each map in its historical context, providing also lists of kings, presidents etc. It is concluded by an extensive bibliography and by two indexes, one of the geographical names on the maps and in the text and one of the names of the numerous persons mentioned in the text.

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Edited by Leonard Blussé and Menghong Chen

The archive of the Kong Koan constitutes the only relatively complete archive of a “diaspora” Chinese urban community in Southeast Asia. The essays in the present volume offer important and new insights into many different aspects of Overseas Chinese life between 1780-1965.
The Kong Koan of colonial Batavia was a semi-autonomous organization, in which the local elite of Jakarta’s Chinese community supervised and coordinated its social and religious matters. During its long existence as a semi-official colonial institution, the Kong Koan collected sizeable Chinese archival holdings with demographic data on marriages and funerals, account books of the religious organisations and temples, documents connected with educational institutions, and the meetings of the board itself.

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Edited by J. Noorduyn and A. Teeuw

Preserved on undated palm-leaf manuscripts, Old Sundanese texts are generally in poor condition and unavailable to a wider audience. There are limited texts in any form of Sundanese, and only limited knowledge of Old Sundanese. In presenting three long Old Sundanese poems, Noorduyn and Teeuw, in a heretofore unequalled English-language study of Old Sundanese literature, bring to the light works of importance for further linguistic, literary and historical research.
The three poems, The Sons of Rama and Rawana, The ascension of Sri Ajnyana and The story of Bujangga Manik: A pilgrim's progress were undiscovered before this book. The first two were found in a nineteenth-century manuscript collection of the former Batavian Society and are now in the National Library of Indonesia in Jakarta, while the third was donated to the Bodleian Library in Oxford as early as 1627, though it was not identified as an Old Sundanese poem until the 1950s.

English in Malaysia

Current Use and Status

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Edited by Toshiko Yamaguchi and David Deterding

English in Malaysia: Current Use and Status offers an account of the English language used in present-day West and East Malaysia and its status anchored in different linguistic, social and educational domains. After an Introduction giving a bird’s eye view of the status of English in Malaysia, the eight main chapters offer case studies revolving around four themes:
i. linguistic features, with special focus on pronunciation and language contact;
ii. language attitudes;
iii. English in on-line discourse; and
iv. English and language policies.

The chapters cover original data and topics, seeking to draw an accurate portrait of Malaysian English, a non-native variety of postcolonial English that is currently developing its pronunciation, grammar, lexis and distinct identity.

Duty, Language and Exegesis in Prābhākara Mīmāṃsā

Including an edition and translation of Rāmānujācārya’s Tantrarahasya, Śāstraprameyapariccheda

Series:

Elisa Freschi

The book is an introduction to key concepts of Indian Philosophy, seen from the perspective of one of its most influential schools, the Prābhākara Mīmāṃsā, which flourished from the 7th until the 20th c. AD. The book includes the critical edition and translation of Rāmānujācārya's Śāstraprameyapariccheda, which is part of his Tantrarahasya (written in South India, after the 14th c.). This text has never been translated before and it is one of the clearest elaboration of the Prābhākara thought.

The book particularly aims at presenting the linguistic, deontic-ethic, hermeneutic and epistemo-logical thought of the Prābhākara Mīmāṃsā. Detailed glossary and indexes make it possible to use the book as a reference-tool for Indian philosophy and linguistics.

Dairi Stories and Pakpak Storytelling

A Storytelling Tradition from the North Sumatran Rainforest

Series:

Clara Brakel-Papenhuijzen

This study of traditional literature in Pakpak-Dairi, an endangered North Sumatran language, is based on written and oral versions of stories. Discussing the views of well-known scholars of Sumatran languages, the book includes the texts of seven stories which were collected in North Sumatra by the well-known linguist Herman Neubronner van der Tuuk (1824-1894) and are kept in Leiden University Library.
The book also contains a story performed in the village of Sukarame by Sonang Sitakar, who may well have been one of the last Pakpak-Dairi storytellers. Presenting unique information on an endangered literary genre from North Sumatra.