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Building on Brill’s extensive experience and traditional strengths in the areas of Asian culture, history and society, the new Korean Studies Library invites submissions of book manuscripts on any time period of Korea, from ancient times to the present day, for consideration in this new series. Social science and humanities publications will be the focus, and the series editors particularly welcome submissions in the areas of premodern history, literature, religion, thought, society and language, and in modern history, literature, religion, political economy and society; the intent is to publish scholarship on Korea that will remain relevant for decades to come.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.

Series:

Edited by Donald Baker

Until the last quarter of the eighteenth century, there were no Christians in Korea. Today Korea is one of the most Christian countries in Asia, with over 30% of South Koreans claiming Christianity as their religious affiliation. The articles in these volumes trace the history of Christianity in Korea from its eighteenth-century beginnings to the present day. These articles address differences in how Catholicism and Protestantism were received, as well as the changing relationship of Christianity to political power, and the impact of Christianity on gender roles. They also examine how Christianity has interacted with the other religious institutions in Korea, and how Christianity has become Koreanized. They present the most sophisticated and the most recent research on the remarkable transformation of the religious culture of Korea over the last two and a half centuries.

Brian Bridges

In ordinary circumstances, one could be forgiven for assuming that sport unites rather than divides people. But, as this first in-depth study of inter-Korean sporting life and competition over more than six decades clearly demonstrates, sport has in fact been held hostage to the ups and downs of inter-Korean political relations.

The two Koreas have devoted considerable resources to developing sporting systems and securing sporting achievement globally, with important ramifications for both national pride and inter-Korean rivalry. And while the author accepts that sport and politics are close allies wherever one travels in the world, it remains the case that for the two Koreas sport plays a more significant central role in the context of the vicissitudes of the relationship across the 38th parallel and has considerable repercussions on sporting ambitions and development for both countries.

This book has wide inter-disciplinary relevance in the context of Korean studies in particular and East Asian politics and international relations in general – with special reference to the phenomenon of ‘two-state rivalry’ as was or still is the case for Germany, Yemen, Vietnam and China/Taiwan. Those pursuing sports studies in an international context will also find this volume invaluable.

Everyday Life in Joseon-Era Korea

Economy and Society

The Organization of Korean Historians

Edited by Michael D. Shin

Winner of the 2014 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

Everyday Life in Joseon-Era Korea shows how the momentous changes of the time transformed the lives of the common people. In twenty-three concise chapters, the book covers topics ranging from agriculture, commerce, and mining to education, marriage, and food culture. It examines how both the spread of Neo-Confucianism in the early Joseon period and its decline from the seventeenth century impacted economic and social life.

The book also demonstrates that much of what is thought of as ancient Korean tradition actually developed in the Joseon period. Chapters in this book discuss how customs such as ancestor worship, the use of genealogies, and foods such as kimchi all originated or became widespread in this era.

Contributors: Kim Kuentae, Yeom Jeong Sup, Kim Sung Woo, Lee Hun-Chang, Lee Uk, Yoo Pil Jo, Kim Kyung-ran, Kim Eui-Hwan, Oh Soo-chang, Ko Dong-Hwan, Kwon Nae-Hyun, Lee Hae Jun, Jung Jin Young, Kwon Ki-jung, Han Sang Kwon, Kwon Soon-Hyung, Jang Dong-Pyo, Seo-Tae-Won, Sim Jae-woo, Chung Yeon-sik, O Jong-rok, Hong Soon Min. This volume was co-translated by Edward Park and Michael D. Shin.

Series:

Young Kyun Oh

In Engraving Virtue, Young Kyun Oh investigates the publishing history of the Samgang Haengsil-to (Illustrated Guide to the Three Relations), a moral primer of Chosŏn (1392–1910), and traces the ways in which woodblock printed books contributed to shaping premodern Korea.
Originally conceived by the court as a book with which to instill in its society Confucian ethics encased in the stories of moral heroes and heroines as filial sons, loyal subjects, and devoted wives, the Samgang Haengsil-to embodies various aspects of Chosŏn society. With careful examinations of its various editions and historical documents, Oh presents how the life of this book reflected the complicated factors of the Chosŏn society and how it became more than just a reading material.