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Manuscript Studies in the Low Countries

Proceedings of the 'Groninger Codicologendagen' in Friesland, 2002

Edited by Anne Margreet W. As-Vijvers, Jos M.M. Hermans and Gerda C. Huisman

Volume 3 of the Boekhistorische Reeks contains the proceedings of the ‘Groninger Codicologendagen in Friesland’, the quadrennial conference on Netherlandish manuscript studies, which in 2002 was held at the Fryske Akademy in Leewarden.

The rich contents of this book reflect the two major conference themes, Books and Teaching, and the Art of Manuscript Illumination. International scholars in these fields investigate both subjects from various angles.

Papers included in the first section offer glimpses of medieval school life, the role of schoolboys in the production of manuscripts and printed books, the use of books by medieval surgeons, the pecia-system to produce manuscripts, and the importance of manuscripts for early modern scholarship.

In the second section the focus is on the state of research and new inquiries in Netherlandish manuscript illumination. Miniatures, border decoration, scribes and workshop practices are the subjects of studies ranging from the Moerdrecht Masters, active in the second quarter of the fifteenth century, to Ghent-Bruges illuminators in the beginning of the sixteenth century, and from mass-produced books of hours to luxurious, secular manuscripts made for members of the Bourgundian court.

In the third part some current book-historical projects are presented, which cover a broad range of important research tools that are now available through the Internet, both for specialists as well as book lovers.

Edited by Angus Phillips

Logos – the international journal of the publishing community – celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2015. Since its first publication it has gained a reputation for publishing insightful and clear-headed articles about publishing, and this tradition continues to the present day, with the addition in recent years of academic articles reflecting the growth in the discipline of publishing studies.

The present collection provides the opportunity to mark this milestone in the journal’s history by reprinting over thirty articles in book form. The selection has been made with a view to representing the full span of the life of the journal, with a good spread across the years of publication from 1990 onwards. The articles selected are ones that have stood the test of time and have something interesting to say. There is broad international coverage, from Argentina to China, from Iran to Kenya, and a wide selection of topics including publishing, bookselling, libraries, censorship, and book history. The new introduction, written by the journal’s editor-in-chief, Angus Phillips, places the articles in perspective, highlighting their currency and foresight.

The volume will be essential reading for both industry professionals and students of book history and publishing studies.

Featured articles are by Maarten Aascher, Marc Aronson, Diana Athill, Betty Ballantine, Michael Bhaskar, Marie-Franҫoise Cachin and Sylvie Ducas-Spaes, Henry Chakava, John Curtis, Tomás Eloy Martínez, Joseph J. Esposito, Richard Fisher, Gordon Graham, Arash Hejazi, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén, Albert Henderson, Philip Jarvis and Sue Thomson, Eva Kneissl, Miha Kovač and Rüdiger Wischenbart, Michael Krüger, Laura J. Miller, Ian Norrie, Angus Phillips, Frances Pinter, Oliviero Ponte di Pino, Tatjana Praštalo, Tim Rix, Tom Rosenthal, Jerome Rubin, John Ryden, Tim Waterstone, and Francis Whitehead.

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Edited by Lotte Hellinga

Since the appearance in 1908 of the first volume of BMC the work has been relied on as one of the main authorities on the earliest printing in Europe. Its coverage of early printing from the European countries in which the new technique was successively introduced provides not only extensive bibliographical descriptions, but introduces the material with an analysis of the development of printing in the relevant areas. This final volume to appear in the series covers England, where printing was not introduced until 1476, a good twenty years after the appearance of the earliest printed books in Mainz. The England volume of BMC responds to the special circumstances of early printing in England by giving particular attention to textual transmission, systematically following each text from source or copy to print whenever possible. Printing-house methods of book-production get full consideration. Notes on further dissemination are extended by an analysis of early ownership (and by implication of readership) taking account of material outside the British Library collection. This is followed by a history of the formation of the collection from 1753 in the British Museum, which began with the great collectors of the eighteenth century, and in which the antiquarian book-trade of this and later periods had an important role.
In view of the new focal points of interest the bibliographical descriptions are more elaborate than in the previous volumes, and include extensive notes on provenance and early readers which are the work of Margaret Nickson. A new forensic element is the systematic investigation of paper used by the printing houses until Caxton's death in 1492, when the nature of production changed. This was undertaken by Paul Needham, who contributes a separate introduction on the trade in paper and paper as evidence for dating and production processes. His investigation, together with the evidence of the use of printing types, underlies the new chronological arrangement which has to be the basis for any interpretation. The resulting chronological list of all printing in England before 1501 is presented in separate tables. The work includes descriptions of 323 copies of books, representing 221 editions of items printed in England, out of a total of 395 known to date, extensive introductions and 52 full-size plates accompanying the descriptions of printing types.

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Ina Kok

Winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)
Winner of the 2015 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

The aims of this publication are twofold. In the first place it gives a complete census of the woodcuts in Dutch and Flemish incunabula, and a record of all places in which they appear. Both the book in which the woodcut (or series of woodcuts) appears for the first time and all repetitions of that woodcut before 1501 have been registered. In the second place a survey and analysis of the woodcuts used by each printer have been given. With this inventory dr. Kok has developed a very accurate dating system for incunabula. Over 3800 different illustrations have been found in the incunabula printed in the Low Countries, which illustrate the history of the use of woodcuts – the different states, the different stages of wear and tear.

This publication was made possible with the cooperation of many libraries and institutions worldwide:
Stichting Huis Bergh, 's-Heerenberg, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, Antwerpen, Belgium (UNESCO Werelderfgoed); Ruusbroec-Genootschap, Antwerpen, Belgium; Erfgoedbibliotheek Hendrik Consience, Antwerpen, Belgium; Staatsbibliothek, Berlin, Germany; Bibliothèque Municipale, Besançon, France; Bibliothèque Royale Albert Ier, Bruxelles, Belgium; University Library, Cambridge, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Köln, Germany; Kongelige Biblioteket, Kopenhagen, Denmark; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Darmstadt, Germany; Stadsarchief en Athenaeumbibliotheek, Deventer, Netherlands; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland; Universitätsbibliothek, Frankfurt, Germany; Universitätsbibliothek, Freiburg, Germany; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Gent, Belgium; Niedersächsische Staats- und Unversitätsbibliothek, Göttingen, Germany; Librije, Gouda, Netherlands; Unversitätsbibliothek, Greifswald, Germany; Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands; Gemeente Archief, Haarlem, Netherlands; Stadsbibliotheek, Haarlem, Netherlands; Harvard College Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Houghton Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Friesch Genootschap, Leeuwarden, Netherlands; Erfgoed Leiden en omstreken, Leiden, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Leiden, Netherlands; Bibliothèque de l'Université, Liège, Belgium; British Library, London, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Lüneburg, Germany; Regionaal historisch centrum Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; Draiflessen Collection (Liberna Collection), Mettingen, Germany; Koninklijk Zeeuwsch Genootschap der Wetenschappen, Middelburg, Netherlands; Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München, Germany; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Münster, Germany; Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven CT, USA; Morgan Library, New York NY, USA; Bibliothek des Evangelischen Predigerseminars Wittenberg, Germany; Bodleian Library, Oxford, England; Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, France; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, France; Huntington Library, San Marino CA, USA; Universitetsbibliothek, Stockholm, Sweden; Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart, Germany; Royal Dutch Library, The Hague, Netherlands; Universitätsbibliothek, Trier, Germany; Universitetsbibliothek, Uppsala, Sweden; Rijksmuseum Catharijne Convent, Utrecht, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Utrecht, Netherlands; Bibliothèque Municipale, Valenciennes, France; Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection, Library of Congress, Washington DC, USA.

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Edited by Karl A. E.. Enenkel

Commentaries played an important role in the transmission of the classical heritage. Early modern intellectuals rarely read classical authors in a simple and “direct” form, but generally via intermediary paratexts, especially all kinds of commentaries. Commentaries presented the classical texts in certain ways that determined and guided the readers’ perception and usages of the texts being commented upon. Early modern commentaries shaped not only school and university education and professional scholarship, but also intellectual and cultural life in the broadest sense, including politics, religion, art, entertainment, health care, geographical discoveries etc., and even various professional activities and segments of life that were seemingly far removed from scholarship and learning, such as warfare and engineering.

Contributors include: Susanna de Beer, Valéry Berlincourt, Marijke Crab, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Karl Enenkel, Gergő Gellérfi, Trine Arlund Hass, Ekaterina Ilyushechkina, Ronny Kaiser, Marc Laureys, Christoph Pieper, Katharina Suter-Meyer, and Floris Verhaart.

Netherlandish Books (NB) (2 Vols.)

Books Published in the Low Countries and Dutch Books Printed Abroad before 1601

Edited by Andrew Pettegree and Malcolm Walsby

Netherlandish Books offers a unique overview of what was printed during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the Low Countries. This bibliography lists descriptions of over 32,000 editions together with bibliographical references, an introduction and indexes. It draws on the analysis of collections situated in libraries throughout the world. This is the first time that all the books published in the various territories that formed the Low Countries are presented together in a single bibliography. Netherlandish Books is an invaluable research tool for all students and scholars interested in the history, culture and literature of the Low Countries, as well as historians of the early modern book world.

Customers interested in this title may also be interested in French Vernacular Books, edited by Andrew Pettegree, Malcolm Walsby and Alexander Wilkinson.

Wace, The Hagiographical Works

The Conception Nostre Dame and the Lives of St Margaret and St Nicholas. Translated with introduction and notes by Jean Blacker, Glyn S. Burgess, Amy V. Ogden with the original texts included

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Jean Blacker, Glyn S. Burgess and Amy Ogden

Best known for his two chronicles, the Roman de Brut and the Roman de Rou, Wace, one of the great pioneers of twelfth-century French writing, is also the author of three hagiographical works: the Conception Nostre Dame and the Lives of St Margaret and St Nicholas. The Conception is the first vernacular work to focus on the life of the Virgin Mary. Emphasising Margaret's concern for women in labour, the Margaret seemingly contributed to the saint's broad popularity. The Nicholas, with its many miracles involving children, equally played a key role in popularising its protagonist's cult. The present volume brings these works together for the first time and provides the original texts, the first translations into English, notes and substantial introductions.

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Laura Delbrugge

A Scholarly Edition of Andrés de Li’s Thesoro de la passion (1494) is the first new edition of this early Castilian Passion text in five hundred years. Originally published in 1494 by the prolific Zaragozan printer Pablo Hurus, this beautifully illustrated devotional offers the modern reader a glimpse into the complex social world of late fifteenth-century Spain. Li’s converso identity permeates his retelling of the Passion through expositions on hypocrisy, anti-Semitism, and false faith. This new, modernized edition of the Thesoro de la passion dramatically illustrates the unique confluence of social, religious, and cultural forces present during the emergence of Spain’s national identity via analyses of the Thesoro’s Classical, Castilian, and Catalan sources, its importance as an early printed book, Li’s portrayal of the Virgin Mary, Christ, and the Passion events, and the importance of Li’s converso perspectives throughout the work.

Dutch Typography in the Sixteenth Century

The Collected Works of Paul Valkema Blouw

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Paul Valkema Blouw

Edited by Paul Dijstelberge and A.R.A. Croiset van Uchelen

When compiling the short-title catalogue of books printed in the sixteenth-century northern Netherlands from 1541 to 1600, Paul Valkema Blouw was confronted with a large number of ‘problem cases’, such as anonymously and/or surreptitiously printed editions, fictitious printers and undated or falsely dated printed works.
By minutely analysing the typefaces, initials, vignettes and other ornaments used, drawing from his extensive knowledge of secondary literature, archival information and his unrivalled typographic memory, he not only managed to attribute a surprising number of these publications to a printer, but also could establish the period of time in which, as well as the places where, they must have been printed.
These findings and the ways in which they were reached are described in the present collection of papers. They are of paramount importance to scholars engaged in research of the period concerned, whether in the field of church history, national history or book history

The Poetic Works of Helius Eobanus Hessus

Volume 3: King of Poets, 1514-1517

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Harry Vredeveld

Hailed as “King of Poets” by Johann Reuchlin in 1514, Eobanus Hessus (1488–1540) was eager to build on his fame with a stream of new works: “Easter Hymn,” “On True Nobility,” “On the Avoidance of Drunkenness,” “Response from His Majesty Maximilian” (answering Hutten’s “Letter from Italia”), and the short epic “Christ’s Victory over the Underworld,” as well as a hitherto unknown “Inaugural Lecture” on Cicero and Plautus. In 1515 he anonymously published a mock-quodlibetical speech that applies the scholastic method of argumentation to “The Species of Drunkards.” Eobanus’ first bestseller, this brilliant satire was reprinted well into the eighteenth century. All of these texts are included in the present volume, along with annotated translations, ground-breaking introductions, and commentary.