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The Mapping of Africa

A Cartobibliography of Printed Maps of the African Continent to 1700

Series:

Richard L. Betz

The Mapping of Africa systematically categorizes and provides an overview of all printed maps showing the entire African continent published from 1508 to 1700. The author has undertaken a review of the literature, conducted an exhaustive investigation in many major libraries and private collections, analyzed these findings, and then compiled information on 174 distinctly separate maps of the African continent. The Introduction contains information about the mapping of Africa before 1508, important world maps which include Africa, and a presentation of the major cartographic models developed for this book.

Courtiers and Cannibals, Angels and Amazons

The Art of the Decorative Cartographic Titlepage

Rodney Shirley

This book aims to preserve and bring forward for wider appreciation the outstanding works of art that many engraved titlepages and frontispieces represent.
Over the time period covered by the present publication – roughly from the 1470s to the 1870s – very many printed books opened with an attractive decorative titlepage or frontispiece; sometimes both. In this book a limited selection has been made from the extremely wide field of known titlepages, mainly by a focus on subject matter which is primarily cartography, geography, history and topography, together with associated disciplines such as astronomy, travel and exploration. A selection of 100 main and approx. 70 supplementary entries adequately covers specimens of different styles, formats, and national characteristics over a four-hundred year time period from the late 15th century onwards. The choice of decorative titlepages or frontispieces includes examples emanating from Italy, Germany (including Switzerland and Austria), the Netherlands (including Flanders), France, Spain, England and some later examples published in the United States.

Series:

Günter Schilder

This is the last and final volume in the series Monumenta Cartographica Neerlandica. This serie is the result of the author's investigations, carried out during the past thirty years in numerous Dutch and foreign collections. In this way rare cartographic material is now more easily accessible. The work is monumental in every respect, and it is indispensable for private as well as public reference collections.
This volume focuses exclusively on the work of Hessel Gerritsz. (c. 1581-1632), who ranks among the most important and influential cartographers of the early-seventeenth-century Amsterdam. He started his career in Willem Jansz. Blaeu's workshop. About 1608 he established himself as an independent engraver, mapmaker and printer. A selection of his maps has been described and reproduced in full size and his position as chart-maker of the Dutch East and West India Company is discussed in detail.
To present an easier access to the whole series, a general index on names, maps and a dozen thematic subjects of all the nine volumes has been compiled. This index volume is included.

Theatrum Orbis Librorum

Liber amicorum Presented to Nico Israel on the Occasion of his Seventieth Birthday

Edited by A.R.A. (Ton) Croiset van Uchelen, Koert van der Horst and Günter Schilder

With contributions on geography, travel, rare books, booktrade, collectors and libraries by C. Koeman, G. Schilder, R. Breugelmans, K. van der Horst, F.A. Janssen, C. Reedijk, J. Storm van Leeuwen, E. Braches, E. Cockx-Indestege, I.H. van Eeghen, H. de la Fontaine Verwey, L. Hellinga-Querido, P.F.J. Obbema, B. van Selm, a.o

Kaarten van de Nederlandse Antillen

Curaçao, Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Eustatius en Sint Maarten tot 1900

Series:

W.E. Renkema

Edited by Paula van Gestel-Van het Schip, Ferjan Ormeling and Peter C.J. van der Krogt

This publication systematically categorizes and provides a nearly complete overview of the great variety of maps, both manuscript and printed, that have been made of the Dutch Antilles. The map descriptions are clarified with information on the creators of the maps and the historical background of the map image. The author has extensively studied how and for which reasons these maps were created. The cartobibliography is preceded by an extensive introduction in which the history of the islands and their inhabitants are described.

In Dutch, with an English summary.

The Deshima Diaries

Marginalia 1700-1740

Edited by Paul van der Velde and Rudolf Bachofner

English translation of the marginalia, or marginal notes, that were added to the text of the Deshima Diaries from the 1670's onwards in order to provide the Dutch chief of Deshima with a quick reference to the notes of his predecessors. This volume covers the marginalia from the 1700-1740 diaries. Providing the general public, and especially those who have neither a command of Dutch nor of Japanese, access to a fascinating period of Japanese history in which the Dutch played such a singular role. At the same time, the serious scholar wil obtain an easy key to the extremely rich holdings of the archive of the Deshima trading factory, which covers a shelf length of more than forty meters in the National Archives in the Netherlands, but which has been only rarely utilized by historians, Japanologists or other scholars.

The Deshima archives of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) were used originally as a corpus of knowledge and experience amassed over the years by generations of Company personnel. It was a source which was consulted by opperhoofden whenever they were in doubt about the right answer to exasperating questions or challenges posed by Japanese society in the form of shogunal decrees, orders by the governors of Nagasaki, and the stubborn demeanor by blackmailing and manipulative officials. Life at Deshima was so regulated and controlled both by workings of the Japanese bureaucracy and by the rhythms of the East India Company's seasonal trade with Japan, that keeping a dagregister or diary in which all the remarkable occurances were noted, assumed crucial importance. This in contrast to other VOC factories where the keeping of a diary, though obligatory, was often neglected. In the isolation of Deshima almost everything seen or heard was 'notable'. Skipping through the text one is also inevitably touched by the suffering inflicted on Japanese society by perennial scourges such as earthquakes, epidemics, 'that one general disease called poverty' and the fires which periodically destroyed large portions of the great cities.

The present volume is a thoroughly revised edition, especially with regard to the Japanese personal and topographical names occurring in the text, of volumes III-IV of the Leiden edition.

Scientific Publications of the Japan-Netherlands Institute No. 12.
Published by the Japan-Netherlands Institute, Tokyo 1992 (original ISBN 4930921015).

The Deshima Diaries

Marginalia 1740-1800

Edited by Leonard Blussé, Cynthia Viallé, Willem Remmelink and Isabel van Daalen

English translation of the marginalia, or marginal notes, that were added to the text of the Deshima Diaries from the 1670's onwards in order to provide the Dutch chief of Deshima with a quick reference to the notes of his predecessors. This volume covers the marginalia from the 1740-4800 diaries. Providing the general public, and especially those who have neither a command of Dutch nor of Japanese access to a fascinating period of Japanese history in which the Dutch played such a singular role. At the same time, the serious scholar wil obtain an easy key to the extremely rich holdings of the archive of the Deshima trading factory, which covers a shelf length of more than forty meters in the National Archives in the Netherlands, but which has been only rarely utilized by historians, Japanologists or other scholars.

In the 1740s, the Dutch East India Company (VOC) was in many ways at the height of its power. The second half of the 18th century saw the decline of the Company from being the high and mighty - and only - trading company which covered from its base in Batavia (Jakarta) all of Asia with a network that stretched from Basra in Persia to Nagasaki in Japan, to becoming a mere shadow of its former self with only a tenous hold on a few possessions in the Indonesian archipelago. By the end of the century, it had lost its establishments in South Africa, India and Ceylon to the British, and its flleet was gone. However, as a trading company, it was dead, but as a proto-colonial producer it was actually doing quite well.

The basis of the present text are the Deshima Dagregisters: their original tables of contents, Vol. VII (1740-1760), Vol. VIII (1760-1780), Vol. IX (1780-1790), Vol. X (1790-1800) published in the Intercontinenta Series Nos. 18 (1993), 19 (1995), 20 (1996), and 21 (1997) by the Institute for the History of European Expansion at Leiden University.

Scientific Publications of the Japan-Netherlands Institute No. 21.
Published by the Japan-Netherlands Institute, Tokyo 2004 (original ISBN 4930921066).

Series:

Edited by Christoph Ehland and Cornelia Wächter

Scholars of the middlebrow have demonstrated that the preferences and choices of both women writers and women readers have suffered considerably from the dismissive attitude of earlier critics. George Eliot’s famous attack on ‘Silly Novels by Lady Novelists’ set the tone for the long tradition of gendered disputes over the literary merit of works of fiction – a controversy which eventually coalesced with a class-based hegemony of taste in the so-called Battle of the Brows.

The new research presented in this volume demonstrates that this gendered inflection of the critical debate is not only one-sided but tends to obfuscate the significance the middlebrow literary spectrum had for the wider dissemination of new concepts of gender. By exploring the scope of middlebrow media culture between 1890 and 1945, from household magazines to popular novels, the essays in this volume give evidence of the relative proximity that existed between middlebrow writers and the avant-garde in their concern for gender issues.

Contributors: Nicola Bishop, Elke D’hoker, Petra Dierkes-Thrun, Stephanie Eggermont, Christoph Ehland, Wendy Gan, Emma Grundy Haigh, Kate Macdonald, Louise McDonald, Tara MacDonald, Isobel Maddison, Ann Rea, Cornelia Wächter, Alice Wood

Series:

Arthur der Weduwen

Winner of the 2019 Menno Hertzberger Encouragement Prize for Book History and Bibliography

In Dutch and Flemish Newspapers of the Seventeenth Century Arthur der Weduwen presents the first comprehensive account of the early newspaper in the Low Countries. Composed of two volumes, this survey provides detailed introductions and bibliographical descriptions of 49 newspapers, surviving in over 16,000 issues in 84 archives and libraries. This work presents a crucial overview of the first fledgling century of newspaper publishing and reading in one of the most advanced political cultures of early modern Europe.

Seventy years after Folke Dahl’s Dutch Corantos first documented early Dutch newspapers, Der Weduwen offers a brand-new approach to the bibliography of the early modern periodical press. This includes, amongst others, a description of places of correspondence listed in each surviving newspaper. The bibliography is accompanied by an extensive introduction of the Dutch and Flemish press in the seventeenth century. What emerges is a picture of a highly competitive and dynamic market for news, in which innovative publishers constantly adapt to the changing tastes of customers and pressures from authorities at home and abroad.