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Edited by Christine Walde

This new Supplement to Brill’s New Pauly gives an overview of the reception and influence of ancient literary works on the literature, art and music from antiquity to the present. Ordered by the names of around 90 authors, detailed and clearly-structured encyclopedic articles discuss the post-classical reception history and interpretation by historical period of the most important works from ancient Greece and Rome. Each article is accompanied by a comprehensive bibliography for further study. This volume will be a welcome addition to scholarship not only for classical and modern literary studies, but also for many other disciplines.
Acta Conventus Neo-Latini is a peer-reviewed series offering a world-wide selection of articles on Neo-Latin language and literature (fiction as well as non-fiction), of relevance for all studies in Early Modern History. The contributions have been presented as papers at the conferences arranged every three years by the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies, and together they represent the current state of affairs in the discipline.

Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Upsaliensis (set, two volumes)

Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Uppsala 2009)

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Edited by Astrid Steiner-Weber

Since 1971, the International Congress for Neo-Latin Studies has been organised every three years in various cities in Europe and North America. In August 2009, Uppsala in Sweden was the venue of the fourteenth Neo-Latin conference, held by the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies. The proceedings of the Uppsala conference have been collected in this volume under the motto “Litteras et artes nobis traditas excolere – Reception and Innovation”. Ninety-nine individual and five plenary papers spanning the period from the Renaissance to the present offer a variety of themes covering a range of genres such as history, literature, philology, art history, and religion. The contributions will be of relevance not only for scholarly readers, but also for an interested non-professional audience.

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Edited by Karl A. E. Enenkel

Erasmus was not only one of the most widely read authors of the early modern period, but one of the most controversial. For some readers he represented the perfect humanist scholar; for others, he was an arrogant hypercritic, a Lutheran heretic and polemicist, a virtuoso writer and rhetorician, an inventor of a new, authentic Latin style, etc. In the present volume, a number of aspects of Erasmus’s manifold reception are discussed, especially lesser-known ones, such as his reception in Neo-Latin poetry. The volume does not focus only on so-called Erasmians, but offers a broader spectrum of reception and demonstrates that Erasmus’s name also was used in order to authorize completely un-Erasmian ideals, such as atheism, radical reformation, Lutheranism, religious intolerance, Jesuit education, Marian devotion, etc.

Contributors include: Philip Ford, Dirk Sacré, Paul J. Smith, Lucia Felici, Gregory D. Dodds, Hilmar M. Pabel, Reinier Leushuis, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Johannes Trapman, and Karl Enenkel.

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Edited by Karl A. E.. Enenkel

Commentaries played an important role in the transmission of the classical heritage. Early modern intellectuals rarely read classical authors in a simple and “direct” form, but generally via intermediary paratexts, especially all kinds of commentaries. Commentaries presented the classical texts in certain ways that determined and guided the readers’ perception and usages of the texts being commented upon. Early modern commentaries shaped not only school and university education and professional scholarship, but also intellectual and cultural life in the broadest sense, including politics, religion, art, entertainment, health care, geographical discoveries etc., and even various professional activities and segments of life that were seemingly far removed from scholarship and learning, such as warfare and engineering.

Contributors include: Susanna de Beer, Valéry Berlincourt, Marijke Crab, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Karl Enenkel, Gergő Gellérfi, Trine Arlund Hass, Ekaterina Ilyushechkina, Ronny Kaiser, Marc Laureys, Christoph Pieper, Katharina Suter-Meyer, and Floris Verhaart.

Les Eschéz d'Amours

A Critical Edition of the Poem and its Latin Glosses

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Gregory Heyworth, Daniel E. O'sullivan and Frank Coulson

Les Eschéz d’Amours may be the last great medieval allegory to find its way into a modern edition. In the tradition of the Roman de la Rose, the Eschéz surveys matters of love, politics, economics, music, medicine, and chess through the lens of classical and Scholastic learning. In addition to the first 16,293 (of over 30,000) verses newly edited out of the manuscripts, the editors present a complete apparatus of literary, historical and linguistic essays that place the poem in the context of the scholarly and courtly life of late 14th century Paris. The important Latin glosses of the Venice manuscript of the Eschéz follow in an edition of their own, with critical notes and translation.

Theodoret, De Graecarum affectionum curatione

Heilung der griechischen Krankheiten

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Edited by Clemens Scholten

The treatise “De Graecarum affectionum curatione” (Therapeia of the Greek Maladies) is considered a highlight of Christian apologetic literature. Bishop Theodoret of Cyrrhus(ca AD 393 - ca AD 460) disputes the prejudice that the Christian faith was incompatible with classical education and civilization. He shows the integrating ability of globally aligned Christianity to establish peaceful local communities. The Greek tradition itself demonstrates the truth of Christianity.
The text is placed in the context of Theodoret’s life and works. Its literary character, place in Christian apologetics, sources, cultural and historical context, and the possibility that Syrian Antioch was its place of origin are all examined. The present edition contains the critical text by Raeder and a German translation with notes.


Die Schrift „De Graecarum affectionum curatione“ (Heilung der griechischen Krankheiten) ist ein Höhe¬punkt der Apologetik der Alten Kirche. Theodoret (circa 393 – circa 460), Bischof von Kyrrhos, tritt dem Vorurteil entgegen, Glaube und Lebensführung der Christen vertrügen sich nicht mit klassischer Bildung und Gesittung. Er wirbt für die integrative Fähigkeit des global ausgerichteten Christentums, friedliche lokale Ge¬meinschaften eta¬blieren zu können. Die griechische Tradition selbst bezeuge die Wahrheit des Christentums.
Die Schrift wird in Leben und Werk Theodorets eingeordnet, ihre literarische Eigenart, ihr Platz in der christlichen Apologetik, ihre Quellen, ihr soziales und historisches Umfeld und Antiochien als möglicher Entstehungsort werden untersucht. Die vorliegende Ausgabe enthält den kritischen Text von Raeder und eine deutsche Übersetzung mit kommentierenden Anmerkungen.

Cicero Refused to Die

Ciceronian Influence through the Centuries

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Edited by Nancy van Deusen

Cicero has indeed refused to die, despite the fact that he, in the year 43 BC, was savagely put to death, a preposterous event that brought an end to the long and illustrious career of a lawyer, politician, statesman, praetor, consul, and above all, intellectual, philosopher, writer. His works on The Ideal Orator, On Law, On Academic Life, On Supreme Good and Evil, The Nature of Gods, Foretelling the Future, Destiny, and Duties constituted the basis of a thorough study of Latin for many centuries of students. One might also, however, conclude that, with the virtual disappearance of Latin as a language that is commonly taught, Cicero might be seen to have suffered a second death; but this is by no means the case. This timely volume explores the many aspects of Ciceronian influence through the Middle Ages—and beyond—on education, literature, and legal training.
Contributors are Christopher S. Celenza, Frank Coulson, Nancy van Deusen, George L. Gorse, Michael Herren, Leonard Michael Koff, Valery Rees, Timothy A. Shonk, Terence Tunberg, and John O. Ward.

Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition

Introduction to Reading Avicenna's Philosophical Works. Second, Revised and Enlarged Edition, Including an Inventory of Avicenna’s Authentic Works

Dimitri Gutas

Through close study of Avicenna's statements and major works, Dimitri Gutas traces Avicenna's own sense of his place in the Aristotelian tradition and the history of philosophy in Islam, and provides an introduction to reading his philosophical works by delineating the approach most consistent with Avicenna's intention and purpose in philosophy. The second edition of this foundational work, which has quickened fruitful research into the philosopher in the last quarter century, is completely revised and updated, and adds a new final chapter summarizing Avicenna's philosophical project. It is also enlarged with the addition of a new appendix which offers a critical inventory of Avicenna's authentic works, updating the work of Mahdavi (1954) with additional information on all manuscripts and important editions and translations. Its usefulness enhanced, the book provides primary orientation to Avicenna's philosophy and works and constitutes an indispensable research tool for their study.

Winner of the I. R. Iran World Award for the Book of the Year 2014

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Thomas Haye

In his monograph Verlorenes Mittelalter, Thomas Haye discusses the question of why the greater part of the Latin texts which were produced over the course of the Middle Ages has not been preserved. Contemporary sources attest to the existence of thousands of texts which have not come down to the modern era. As Haye demonstrates, these losses are not primarily due to random happenstance, but are often rather the results of certain aspects of contemporary mentality, sociohistorical circumstances, preferences regarding literary genres and other specific cultural factors.
Modern literary histories largely disregard the lost texts. The present book argues for the development of a new narrative which duly takes into account the lost texts as well as those that still exist.